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ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 

1985 



IN MEMORIAM 



DANIEL F. HORGAN 

Planning Board 1966-1971 

CLEMENT MCCARTHY 

Town Counsel 1971-1976 

HAROLD J. PEARSON 

Planning Board 1952-1962 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1985 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1985: . 
Assessed Valuation 



1985 



Tax Rate: 

United States Senators in Congress: 

5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court: 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. 

It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 

Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,569 

5843,374,753.00 (Real Estate) 

527,781,500.00 (Personal Property) 

521.50 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord 
Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday 1:00 

Tuesday - Thursday 9:00 

Friday and Saturday 10:00 

Sunday 2:00 

Monday and Wednesday. . . .10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m 

Tuesday and Thursday 2:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m 

Friday and Saturday 10:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m 

Monday - Thursday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m 

Friday - Closed 

Saturday 9:00 a.m 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m 



p.m. 


-9:00 p.m 


a.m. 


-9:00 p.m 


a.m. 


-5:30 p.m 


p.m. 


-5:00 p.m 



5:00 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
00 p.m. 
-8:00 p.m. 



-5:00 
-8:00 



p.m. 
p.m. 



-5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Saturday in April 

Last Monday in April 

7:00 p.m. -every other Monday 

7:30 p.m. -every other Tuesday 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. of month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday of month 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. of month 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. of month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 



12 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
10 Wilson Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Dennis E. McHugh 
(Term Expires 1987) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires 1987) 



School Committee 

Carl A. Olsson Term Expires 1986 

James Brough Term Expires 1986 

Carol C. Cleven Term Expires 1987 

Samuel Poulten Term Expires 1987 

Nicholas G. Gavriel Term Expires 1988 

Sewer Commissioners 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1986 

Jean R. Organ Term Expires 1987 

Barry B. Balan Term Expires 1988 

Library Trustees 

Janet B. Hendl Term Expires 1986 

Brenda M. McDermott Term Expires 1986 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy Term Expires 1987 

D. Lorraine Lambert Term Expires 1987 

Mark W. Gauthier Term Expires 1988 

Susan G. Cantin Term Expires 1988 

Constable 

William E. Spence Term Expires 1986 

Tree Warden 

Frank Wojtas Term Expires 1987 

Varney Playground Commissioners 
(Elected at Town Meeting) 

Norbert J. McHale Term Expires 1986 

Harry J. Ayotte Term Expires 1987 

Bernard Battles Term Expires 1988 

Robert C. McManimon Term Expired 1985 

Finance Committee 
(Appointed by Moderator) 

David McLachlan Term Expires 1986 

George Ripsom Term Expires 1986 

George A. Nelson Term Expires 1987 

Dwight M. Hayward Term Expires 1987 

Sheryl A. Boss Term Expires 1987 

Marion E. Marshall Term Expires 1988 

Myra Silver Term Expires 1988 

Martin Ames Resigned 



Board of Selectmen 

Dennis J. Ready Term Expires 1986 

Paul C. Hart Term Expires 1986 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1987 

Bonita A. Towle Term Expires 1988 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1988 

Treasurer & Tax Collector 

James R. Doukszewicz Term Expires 1987 

Board of Assessors 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1986 

Janet Lombard Term Expires 1987 

James H. McBride Term Expires 1988 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1986 

Charlotte P. DeWolfe Term Expires 1987 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1988 

Housing Authority 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1986 

Claude A. Harvey Term Expires 1987 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1988 

Pamela Turnbull Term Expires 1988 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1990 

Board of Health 

Paul J. Canniff Term Expires 1986 

Peter Dulchinos Term Expires 1987 

Paul E. McCarthy Term Expires 1988 

Park Commissioners 

Eileen Duffy Term Expires 1986 

Mary P. Bennett Term Expires 1987 

Robert L. Wetmore Term Expires 1988 

Planning Board 

John F. McCarthy Term Expires 1986 

Ann McCarthy Term Expires 1986 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1987 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Term Expires 1987 

Charles A. Parlee Term Expires 1988 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Term Expires 1988 

Rosalind M. Boyle Term Expires 1988 




CHELMSFORD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



On April 8, 1985, following the Town Elections, the 
Board of Selectmen met and elected Dennis J. Ready as 
Chairman and John P. Emerson, Jr. as Vice Chairman. 
Bonita A. Towle was elected as Clerk. The membership 
of the Board also includes Roger Blomgren and Paul C. 
Hart. 

The highlights of 1985 are summarized below: 

January, 1985: 

During January 1985. work continued on the Fiscal 
Year 1986 Budget and Warrant for Town Meeting. 
Owners of the Chelmsford Mobile Home Park 
notified residents that they plan a change of use 
and/or discontinuance of the park, but no earlier 
than January 1, 1987 for personal and financial 
reasons. The Alpine Bowling Lanes announced it 
would be closing and probably would be purchased 
by Emile Dumont, owner of the nearby Heritage Inn. 
Selectman BlomgTen began to collect signatures to 
put the question on the April Town Election Ballot 
asking voter support for formation of a Town Charter 
Commission. A grant of $10,000 from the Massachu- 
setts Historical Commission was obtained for the re- 
painting and refurbishing of the Town Hall. 

February, 1985 

Browning Ferris Industries is proposing a waste to 
energy facility on Stedman Street. The Mass. 
Historical Commission awarded a grant to the Town 
for repairs to be made to the roof and porch of the 
Old Town Hall. Norman Thidemann, who had serv- 
ed as Executive Secretary to the Board for over five 
years, announced that he will be resigning the end 
of March to take the position of Town Manager in 



Greenfield. Application was made for $40,000 in 
federal funds (to be matched by Town funds) to study 
the feasibility of a hydro project using the spillway 
at Crystal Lake. 

March, 1985 

The Rent Control Board held its first meeting and 
began formulating rules and regulations governing 
rent control in the Mobile Home Park. The State 
Department of Public Works approved the Town's re- 
quest for traffic improvements along Route 110 to in- 
clude Fletcher Street, Route 110 at Golden Cove and 
Stedman Street, at the entrance to the Chelmsford 
Mall and at the Southbound ramp on Route 3. Resi- 
dents began expressing concern about the location 
of a resource recovery plant on Parkhurst Road, and 
forwarded petitions to the Board. Charles Parlee 
presented a proposal for the rehabilitation of 
buildings in Vinal Square which will help revitalize 
that area of Town. A presentation was made by 
Mascester Company to construct a United Parcel 
Distribution Center on Brick Kiln Road, an estimated 
$20 million facility. 

April, 1985 

Bernard F. Lynch was appointed Acting Ad- 
ministrative Assistant and Chairman Ready announc- 
ed that the Board is actively seeking applicants for 
the position of Executive Secretary. The warrant for 
the Annual Town Meeting was posted, and included 
articles to rescind rent control for the Mobile Home 
Park and to abolish the Personnel Board and con- 
solidate all personnel functions under the School 
Department Personnel Administrator. B & P Pain- 
ting of Lynn was awarded the contract for the paint- 



ing of the Old Town Hall in its original colors of 100 
years ago. The Board participated in Student Govern- 
ment Day, together with the School Department and 
other Town departments, and the Chelmsford Lodge 
of Elks, sponsors of the events of the day. 

May, 1985 

The Board continued its search for an Executive Sec- 
retary. They also suspended liquor licenses at the Mai 
Kai and McEnaney's Market for 7-day periods for sell- 
ing alcoholic beverages to minors. Assistant Dog Of- 
ficer William Shedd was appointed Dog Officer to 
replace Neal Stanley, who resigned. The business of 
the Annual Town Meeting was completed after 
several lengthy session. 

June, 1985 

A Fuel Storage Permit was granted to the proposed 
UPS facility on Brick Kiln Road. The Board studied 
the regulations of the Rent Control Board. Interviews 
for the position of Executive Secretary were con- 
ducted, with Bernard Lynch and Howard Redfern, 
Jr. the two finalists. The Chelmsford Industrial Sewer 
District was formed, with individual members of pro- 
perty in the "Golden Triangle" area will set up the 
district and apply for federal and state assistance. The 
new district must be approved by the State Legisla- 
ture. The Board announced that they are seeking 
candidates for the Blue Ribbon Resource Recovery 
Committee, which will be looking into the proposed 
waste to energy project. Seven Police Officers ap- 
pointed by the Board graduated from the State Police 
Academy, including Chelmsford's first two women of- 
ficers. 



Board, which is necessary because under State law 
by 1988 the Town must reduce from 12 to 9 precincts. 
Plans for an $8 million expansion of the Heritage Inn 
were presented to the Board, with the statement that 
despite public opposition there will be no access to 
or from Fletcher Street. Hurricane Gloria was the 
most newsworthy event during the month, causing 
more than $400,000 worth of damage. There were 
no personal injuries reported, but many trees and 
power lines were downed and the Board con- 
gratulated all Town departments for their hard work 
and cooperation during the emergency. 

October, 1985 

The Blue Ribbon Resource Recovery Committee 
finally received the proposal from BFI for refusal 
disposal. The proposal envisions building the in- 
cinerator facilities in Lowell and using land in 
Chelmsford for disposing of the residue. A spec- 
tacular 4-alarm fire in a warehouse at 100 Wotton 
Lane, North Chelmsford caused injuries to 4 fire- 
fighters and damage to the three firms using the 
facilities for storage. The Board and the Blue Rib- 
bon Committee approved the taking of the land 
presently used by Glenview Sand and Gravel on Sted- 
man Street. This land- taking must be approved by 
Town Meeting action and would be used for dump- 
ing the ash from the incinerator in Lowell. The Com- 
mittee was told by their traffic consultant that the 
impact of a resource recovery plant would be 
minimal, only 200 vehicles per day for this use com- 
pared with an estimated 17,000 vehicles if the land 
is used for commercial purposes and 4,000 if used 
for industrial. 



July, 1985 

Howard W. Redfern, Jr. is named by the Board as 
their new Executive Secretary, effective July 15, 1985. 
The Dog Pound Committee has reviewed and revis- 
ed plans submitted by the architect, and plans to go 
out for bid in August. A sign is posted warning that 
the Alpine Lanes parking lot which has been used 
for many years as a shortcut to Parlmont Plaza from 
Fletcher Street. The Blue Ribbon Resource Recovery 
Committee is looking into other alternatives for waste 
to energy projects if the Town should vote against the 
BFI proposal, and has set up sub-committees deal- 
ing with environmental, economic and technical 
issues. The Board held a ceremony renaming 
"Chicken Corner" in the Center "Eriksen Corner in 
honor of Henry Eriksen, who had been a long-time 
storekeeper in the front part of the Parkhurst 
Building. They presented a check for $5,000 to the 
Friends of the Senior Center as "seed money" to help 
start their campaign for a new Senior Center. Chair- 
man Ready recommended that additional proposals 
for the North School site might be requested in ad- 
dition to that of the Housing Authority. 

September, 1985 

The Town Clerk and Board of Registrars presented 
a realignment of voting precinct boundaries to the 



November, 1985 

Richard Eng, owner of the Hong & Kong Restaurant 
in Parlmont Plaza, told the Board he fears the loss 
of access for his deliverymen and customers and a 
loss of parking space if the plans for the expansion 
of the Heritage Inn are approved and the access road 
from Fletcher Street is closed on a permanent basis. 
Petitions circulated and signed by numerous towns- 
people were presented to the Board, and the hazards 
of additional traffic on Chelmsford Street were 
discussed. 

December, 1985 

Executive Secretary Howard Redfern and three 
members of the Resource Recovery Committee took 
a brief trip to Dusseldorf, Germany to inspect a 
resource recovery facility in operation. They reported 
that they found the facility to be acceptable, and the 
committee will now ask BFI to state its intentions as 
to the siting of its proposed refuse plant and the ac- 
companying landfill and what the economic benefits 
would be to the Town. The Southwell Field Working 
Committee continued its plans for renovating the 
North Chelmsford site into a recreational facility for 
the Townspeople under a $400,000 federal grant, and 
announced that they would be going out for bid in 
the early Spring of 1986. The Holiday Decorations 



Committee continued their fine tradition of decora- 
ting the center of Town and the Town Common in 
keeping with the season. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex 
County Selectmen's Association, the Northern Middlesex 
Area Commission, the Middlesex County Advisory Board 
and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. Individual 
Selectmen also served as liaisons between the Board of 
Selectmen and various town and regional boards and com- 
missions during the year. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board of 
Selectmen maintained constant contact with Congressman 
Atkins' office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and State 
Representative Bruce Freeman. The Selectmen wish to ex- 
press their gratitude to Congressman Atkins, Senator 
Amick and Representative Freeman for their help and 
cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their accomplish- 
ments during the past year. It should be remembered that 
these boards and committees are composed of unpaid 
volunteers who take many long hours out of their free time 
to work on issues and projects that benefit the Town of 
Chelmsford. The Board would also like to recognize our 
competent and dedicated office staff of Mrs. Judith Carter, 
Mrs. Evelyn Newman, who left the office the first of Oc- 
tober to work with the Sewer Commission, and Mrs. Beth 
Gibbs. who joined the staff in October. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Vice 

Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. BlomgTen 

Paul C. Hart 

Howard W. Redfern, Jr. 
Executive Secretary 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Assistant Town Clerk 



Sporting 


Dog 


Kennel 


Recorded 


Licenses 


Licenses 


Licenses 


Mortgages Etc. 


1224 


2948 


11 


753 


Births inc. 


Deaths 
243 


Marriages 
289 


Intentions 


324 


287 



WARRANT FOR THE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 6, 1985 and APRIL 29, 1985 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. The New Town Office Building Gym- 
nasium 
Precinct 2. North Congregational Church Hall 
Precinct 3. Parker School Band Room 
Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 
Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6. Westland School Cafeteria 
Precinct 7, North Congregational Church Hall 
Precinct 8. McCarthy Junior High School, Small 

Gymnasium 
Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 
Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 
Precinct 11. Westlands School Cafeteria 
Precinct 12. McCarthy Junior High School. Small 
Gymnasium 

On Saturday, the sixth (6th) day of April, 1985, being 
the first Saturday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 

One Assessor for three years 

One Member of Board of Health for three years 

One Member of School Committee for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

Two Public Library Trustees for three years 

One Park Commissioner for three years 

Three Planning Board Members for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years 

and to vote on the following question: 



THIS QUESTION IS NON-BINDING 

Should the Board of Selectmen vote to estab- 
lish different percentages of the local tax levy 
to be borne by different use classifications of 
real property as set forth in General Law Chap- 
ter 59 Section 2A 



YES 
NO 



The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gym- 
nasium on Monday, the twenty-ninth (29th) day of April, 
1985, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and Com- 
mittees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 
1985 as follows: 

1. Under Section 6, "Classification of Present Town 
Employees", amend Subsection (E)— "Wage and 
Salary Schedule" by deleting the existing schedule 
and substituting the following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1985— JUNE 30, 1986 



Grade Level 

1A 

IB 

1C 

ID 

2 

3 

4 

5 



Salary Range 

11,490-14,305 
12,988-16,170 
14,486-18,035 
17,483-21,766 
21,979-27,364 
29,473-36,694 
33,970-42,293 
38,467-47,891 



Under Section 6 subtitled Classification of Present 
Town Employees, delete Subsection D. and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(D) The wage and salary schedule shall be main- 
tained by the following criteria: 

I. There shall be eight salary grade levels 
designated 1A, IB, 1C, ID, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

1 1 . The minimum salary for each salary grade 
shall be determined by the Personnel 
Board. 

III. The maximum salary for each salary grade 
will be 1.245 times the minimum salary for 
that grade. 

IV. There are 11 steps in each salary grade. 
Each incremental step is 2.45% of the 
minimum salary for that grade. 



The wage and salary schedule will be stated 
in annual dollars. 



150E, and to reflect current salaries and grade levels under 
the Personnel By-Law as follows: 



VI. Hourly rates for those jobs that are paid 
on an hourly basis will be the annual salary 
divided by 2088 (52.2 weeks times 40 
hours) for jobs designated "Mechanical and 
Construction, Conservation and Ceme- 
teries, Custodian and Health" and will be 
the annual salary divided by 1957.5 (52.2 
weeks x 37.5) for jobs designated Adminis- 
trative and Clerical. 

3. Under Section 8 subtitled Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions, delete paragraph (B) and 
substitute the following in its place: 

(B) Any employee who is at step 1 or above may be 
advanced to a higher step on the first day of the 
fiscal year. Such increases are to be based on the 
employee's job performance and development 
during the previous year. Performance evalua- 
tions for all employees must be submitted to the 
Personnel Board by the first day in May. In- 
creases greater than one step must be presented 
in person by the employee's Department Head 
or equivalent to the Personnel Board. Employees 
who are at the maximum of their salary grade 
may also be eligible for a one step merit increase 
upon approval of the Personnel Board. 

4. Under Section 16 subtitled Sick Leave, delete 
paragraph (C) and substitute the following in its 
place: 

(C) Accrued sick leave will be paid at the time of 
retirement, or at death to the employee's surviv- 
ing spouse, or, if none, to the Representative of 
the employee's Estate, to the maximum extent of 
120 days. 

5. Under Section 26 subtitled Bereavement and 
Funeral Leave, delete paragraph (A) and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(A) All full time permanent employees covered by 
this plan shall be entitled to leave without loss 
of pay not to exceed (3) days in the event of the 
death of the employee's spouse, children, parents, 
grandparents, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sibl- 
ings, and grandchildren; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law by further amen- 
ding Section 24, Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages 
and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law, 
to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with cer- 
tain labor organizations, pursuant to General Law Chapter 



7/85 - 8/86 

Proposed 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL Level 

1. Executive Secretary 4 

2. Town Accountant 3 

3. Veteran's Agent 2 

4. Town Aide 2 

5. Assistant to Assessors ID 

6. Assistant Town Clerk ID 

7. Assistant Treasurer ID 

8. Clerk. Senior 1C 

9. Clerk. Junior 1A 

10. Clerk, Part-Time 1A 

11. Town Counsel 

12. Board of Reg.. Three Members 

13. Assistant Town Accountant ID 

CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 2 

2. Supt. of Inspect & Pest Control — 

3. Landscaper— Park 1A 

4. Laborer — Park 1A 

5. Unskilled Laborer #2, #4 

6. Skilled Forest Workman — Conservation . ... 1A 

7. Equipment Operator 1C 

8. Park Superintendent 2 

CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian . IB 

LIBRARY 

1. Library Director 3 

2. Library Department Head ID 

3. Library Specialist 1C 

4. Library Assistant IB 

5 . Library Clerk 1 A 

6. Maintenance Assistant IB 

7 Page #2, #4 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 3 

2. Highway Foreman 2 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Department #2. #5 

2. Deputy Fire Chief #2 

3. Captain #2 

4. Mechanic (Fire and Police) #2 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 5 

2. Deputy Chief 4 

3. Captain 3 

RECREATION 

1. Director/Youth Center Coordinator 2 

2. Clerk, Part-Time 1A 

3. Waterfront Director 1A 

4. Swimming Instructor 1A 

5. Lifeguard 1A 

6. Playground Supervisor IB 

7. Recreation Specialist 1A 

8. Recreation Leader 1A 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 1C 

10. Youth Center Leaders 1A 

OTHER POSITIONS 

1. Building Inspector 3 

2. Electric Inspector 2 

3. Local Inspector 2 

4. Gas Inspector #2 

5. Dog Officer 1C 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 1A 

7. Van Driver IB 

8. Sealer of Weights & Measures #2 

9. Animal Inspector #2 

10. Clock Winder #2 

11. Town Engineer 3 



Proposed 

Salary 



$500 PA. 
360 PA. 



1.250 PA. 



$6,000 PA. 



$2,000 P.A. 
$1,000 P.A. 
$ 200 P.A. 



10 



FOOTNOTES 

#1— Represented by Collective Bargaining 
#2 - Not in "Job Rating Plan" 
#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5— Salary will be 200% of the highest paid Union Firefighters established by 
State Law; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



Petition 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the 
site of the Dog Pound established by Article 1 of the May 
16, 1983 Special Town Meeting, from the Police Station 
located on North Road, to such other site located on Town 
owned property as determined by the Board of Selectmen; 
or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray Town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 1985 
to June 30, 1986; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning July 1, 1985; in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all ac- 
counts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to pay an ad- 
ditional or subsidiary rate in addition to the payment of 
fifty percent of a premium for contributory group life, 
hospital and surgical, medical, dental and other health in- 
surance for employees retired from the service of the Town, 
and their dependents, in the same proportion as the Town 
pays said additional or subsidiary rates for active Town 
employees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion 
of the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
Mobile Home Park Rent Control Act adopted as a By-Law 
of the Town of Chelmsford at a Special Town Meeting held 
on January 9, 1984; or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer and appropriate from available funds, 
transfer and appropriate from the stabilization fund, 
transfer and appropriate from revenue sharing funds, 
and/or borrow a certain sum of money for capital im- 
provements throughout the Town and Capital Improve- 
ments for the School Department as recommended at Town 
Meeting by the Capital Planning Committee; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of implementing a Traffic Con- 
trol Division within the Police Department; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to publish an additional Town History covering 
the years 1915 through 1975; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article VII miscellaneous by deleting Sec- 
tion 3 Auctions — Sales in its entirety and substitute the 
following; 

Section 3 Auctions — Sales 

All auctions and sales in public buildings in the Town 
of Chelmsford are hereby prohibited except for the 
purpose of Town business or such other business as 
may be deemed proper or necessary by the Commit- 
tee, Board, or Officer having charge of said public 
building: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations Section 16 
by deleting Section 16. Solicitors in its entirety and 
substituting the following: 



11 



Section 16. Solicitors 

No person, corporation or other organization shall 
solicit orders or subscriptions for goods or services, 
or sell goods or services door to door, in the Town 
without first having registered with the Police Depart- 
ment. There shall be no door to door solicitation or 
selling before 9:00 o'clock in the forenoon or after 
6:00 o'clock in the evening; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel, Wage, and Salary Administration By-law Sec- 
tion 3, Personnel Board by deleting said Section 3 in its 
entirety and substituting the following: 

3. Personnel Board 

This plan shall be administered by the Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools for Personnel, who shall 
hereafter be known as the Personnel Administrator. 
All references to the Personnel Board in these by-laws 
shall hereafter mean the Personnel Administrator, 
and the Personnel Administrator shall have all the 
rights, titles, and obligations granted to the Person- 
nel Board as governed therein; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 
any held by the town, in a certain parcel of land on 
Wightman Street, shown as Lot 14, Blk 10 on Assessors' 
Plat 19 and being the premises taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated May 3, 1979 
and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
in Book 2364, Page 152, containing approximately 5,000 
square feet, more or less, of land; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmens, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 
any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
at 283 Riverneck Road and being the premises taken by 
the Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated 
July 29, 1977 and recorded in the Middlesex North Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds in Book 2260, Page 274, contain- 
ing approximately 24,675 square feet of land, more or less; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. to see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 



any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
on Billerica Road, shown as Lots 39A and 42B, Blk 36 on 
Assessors' Plat 129 and more particularly described in a 
certificate of title recorded in the Land Court, Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds, Certificate of Title 
number 6668, Book 36, Page 141; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 
any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land located 
at 9 Alcorn Road, and being the premises taken by the 
Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking dated May 
3, 1979 and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry 
of Deeds in Book 2364, Page 135, containing approximately 
1.3 acres of land, more or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey all right, title, and interest, if any, in a cer- 
tain parcel of land located at 7 Fourth Avenue, and being 
the premises taken by the Town of Chelmsford by an in- 
strument of taking, dated December 27, 1973 and recorded 
in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, in Book 
2096, Page 686, and shown on Assessors Map 66 as Lot 
68, containing approximately 3,240 square feet of land 
more or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple by pur- 
chase, eminent domain, or otherwise, the property located 
on Fletcher Street, in the Town of Chelmsford, and fur- 
ther described as Parcel A and Parcel B as follows: 

PARCEL A 

A certain parcel of land located on the southerly side 
of Fletcher Street on the westerly side of Chelmsford 
Street, Town of Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass- 
achusetts, and shown as Parcel A on a certain plan 
entitled "Highway Taking Plan of Land in Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts", Scale 1"=10', March 19, 1985 
by SEA Consultants, Inc. bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the westerly corner of the lot at the in- 
tersection of lot line and Fletcher Street running 
along the lot line south 14 -54 -00" west seven (7 ') 
feet; 

Thence north 75 -06 -00 " east approximately one 
hundred eight (108') feet; 

Thence southerly along a curve of thirteen (13 ') foot 
radius approximately twenty-eight (28 ') feet to the 
intersection of Chelmsford Street; 



12 



Thence north 46 -44 -00 " east along Chelmsford 
Street approximately nine (9') feet; 

Thence north 28 -07 -11 " west twenty-four and 27/100 
(24.27 ') feet to the intersection with Fletcher Street; 

Thence south 75 -06 -00 " west along Fletcher Street 
approximately one hundred eight (108 ') feet to the 
point of beginning, containing approximately 800 
square feet. 

PARCEL B 

A certain parcel of land located on the southerly side 
of Fletcher Street on the westerly side of Chelmsford 
Street, Town of Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass- 
achusetts, and shown as Parcel B on a certain plan 
entitled "Highway Taking Plan of Land in Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts", Scale 1 ' = 10 ', March 19, 1985 
by SEA Consultants, Inc. bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the northerly corner of the lot at the 
intersection of the lot line and Fletcher Street and 
running along the lot line south 14 -54 -00 " west seven 
(7') feet; 

Thence south 75 -06 -00" west approximately fifty- 
seven (57 ') feet; 

Thence north 43 -51 -00" west approximately thir- 
teen and 5/10 (13.5') feet to the intersection with 
Fletcher Street; 



housing construction, increased costs of construction, 
finance and inflation, and which has resulted in a substan- 
tial and increasing shortage of rental housing accommoda- 
tions for families of low and moderate income; that unless 
residential rents and evictions of tenants are regulated and 
controlled, such emergency and the further inflationary 
pressures resulting therefrom will produce serious threats 
to the public health, safety and general welfare of the citi- 
zens of the Town of Chelmsford; that such emergency 
should be met immediately and with due regard for the 
rights and responsibilities of the citizenry of the Town of 
Chelmsford by petitioning the Great and General Court 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact special 
Legislation enabling the Town of Chelmsford to amend its 
code for the purpose of controlling rents and evictions in 
residential rental housing accommodations. Such Legisla- 
tion shall read as follows: 

SECTION 1. This By-Law shall be known and may be 
cited as the "CHELMSFORD RENT CONTROL ACT" 

SECTION 2. Definitions The Town of Chelmsford may, 
by By-Law, control rents and evictions for housing accom- 
modations and in furtherance thereof may adopt the 
following provision in whole or in part: 

(A) "Rental units", any building, structure or land ap- 
purtenant thereto, or any other real or personal pro- 
perty rented or offered for rent for living or dwelling 
purposes, including houses, apartments, rooming or 
boarding house units, and other properties used for 
living or dwelling purposes, together with all services 
connected with the use or occupancy of such property. 



Thence north 75 -06 -00" east along Fletcher Street 
approximately fifty-seven (57 ') feet to the point of 
beginning, containing approximately 440 square feet: 

Said parcel being further shown as Parcel A and Parcel 
B on a certain plan filed with the Town Engineer entitled, 
"Highway Taking Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Massachu- 
setts", prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1 " = 10 '. 
March 19, 1985 by SEA Consultants, Inc.. Consulting 
Engineers, 54 Canal Street, Boston. Massachusetts for the 
purpose of constructing improvements and widening Flet- 
cher Street as part of the Chelmsford Street/ Fletcher Street 
intersection improvements; and to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow a certain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition of said 
land and for paying any damages which may be awarded 
as a result of any such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to determine 
that there exists a serious public emergency with respect 
to the housing of a subtantial number of citizens in the 
Town of Chelmsford, which emergency has been created 
by housing demolition, conversion of apartments to con- 
dominium form of ownership deterioration of a substan- 
tial portion of the existing housing stock, insufficient new 



(B) "Controlled rental units", all rental units except: 

(1) rental units in hotels, motels, inns, tourist homes 
and rooming or boarding houses which are rented 
primarily to transient guests for a period of less than 
fourteen consecutive days; 

(2) rental units the construction of which was com- 
pleted on or after January 1, nineteen hundred and 
eighty-four, or which are housing units created by 
conversion from a non-housing to a housing use on 
or after said date; 

(3) rental units, which a governmental unit, agen- 
cy, or authority either: 

(i) owns or operates; or 

(ii) regulates the rents, other than units regulated 
(a) under the provisions of this act or (b) under 
the provision of Chapter seven hundred and 
ninety-seven of the acts of nineteen hundred and 
sixty-nine and any act in amendment thereof or 
in addition thereto, or (c) under the provisions 
of any other general or special law authorizing 
municipal control of rental levels for all or cer- 
tain rental units with a municipality; or 



13 



(iii) finances or subsidizes, if the imposition of 
rent control would result in the cancellation or 
withdrawal, by law, of such financing or subsidy; 

(4) rental units in cooperatives; 

(5) rental units in any hospital, convent, monastery, 
asylum, college or school dormitory operated ex- 
clusively for charitable or educational purposes or 
any public institution operated exclusively for 
charitable or educational purposes; or rental units 
in a nursing home, rest home, or charitable home 
for the aged, not organized or operated for profit; 

(6) the rental unit or units in an owner-occupied 
two-family or three-family house; 

(7) rental units for which the rent charges exceed 
limits specified by the Board of Selectmen; provid- 
ed that in no event shall more than twenty-five per- 
cent of the total rental units in the Town of 
Chelmsford be exempted under this subsection. 

(C) "Rent", the consideration including any bonus or 
gratuity demanded or received for or in connection 
with the use or occupancy of rental units. 

(D) "Services", repairs, replacements, maintenance, 
painting, providing light, heat hot and cold water, 
elevator service, window shades and screens, storage, 
kitchen, bath and laundry facilities and privileges, 
janitor services, refuse removal, furnishings, and any 
other benefit, privilege or facility connected with the 
use of occupancy of any rental unit. Services to a ren- 
tal unit shall include a proportionate part of services 
provided to common facilities of the building in which 
the rental unit is contained. 

SECTION 3. Chelmsford Rent Control Board: There 
is hereby established a Chelmsford Rent Control Board con- 
sisting of five residents of the Town of Chelmsford to be 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

SECTION 4. Duties and Powers: 

(1) The Rent Board shall set maximum rents, set 
minimum standards for use or occupancy of control- 
led rental units and evictions of tenants therefrom; may 
require information of owners of said controlled ren- 
tal units relating to said controlled rental units under 
penalties of perjury. 

(2) The Rent Board may make rules and regulations, 
sue and be sued, compel attendance of persons and 
the production of papers and information, and issue 
appropriate orders which shall be binding on both the 
owner of and tenants in such controlled rental units. 

SECTION 5. Standards for Adjusting Rents: 

(1) The Rent Board may make individual or general 
adjustments, either upward or downward, as may be 



necessary to assure that rents for controlled rental units 
are established on levels which yield to owners a fair 
net operating income for such units. 

(2) Fair net operating income shall be that income 
which will yield a return, after all reasonable operating 
expenses, on the fair market value of the property, 
equal to the debt service rate generally available from 
institutional first mortgage lenders or such other rates 
of return as the Rent Board, on the basis of evidence 
presented before it, deems more appropriate to the cir- 
cumstances of the case. 

(3) Fair market value shall be the assessed valuation 
of the property or such other valuation as the Rent 
Board, on the basis of evidence presented before it, 
deems more appropriate to the circumstances of the 
case. 

(4) The Rent Board may establish further standards 
and rules consistent with the foregoing. 

SECTION 7. Review: 

(1) The Rent Board and its actions shall be subject to 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
30A, (Administrative Procedure Act) as if the Rent 
Board were an agency of the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts. 

(2) The District Court of Lowell shall have original 
jurisdiction, concurrently with the Superior Court, of 
all petitions for review brought pursuant to Section 
Fourteen of Chapter 30A of the General Laws. 

(3) The Superior Court shall have jurisdiction to en- 
force the provisions of the By-Law, and may restrain 
by injunction violations thereof. 

SECTION 8. Maximum Rent: 

(1) The maximum rent of a controlled rental unit shall 
be the rent charged the occupant for the month six 
months prior to the acceptance of the Article by Town 
Meeting. If the controlled rental unit was unoccupied 
at the time but was occupied at any time prior to ac- 
ceptance of this act, the maximum rent shall be the 
rent charged therefore for the month closest to and 
prior to six months prior to the acceptance of this Ar- 
ticle by Town Meeting. 

(2) If the maximum rent is not otherwise established, 
it shall be established by the Rent Board. Any max- 
imum rent may be subsequently adjusted under the 
provisions of Sections 4 and 5. 

SECTION 9. Penalties: Violations of this By-Law or 
any order of the Board shall be punishable by a fine of 
not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000) for any one 
offense. 



14 



SECTION 10. Severability: If any provisions of this By- 
Law shall be held invalid, the validity of the remainder 
of this By-Law shall not be affected thereby; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map to change from Single 
Residence District (RA and RB) to Multiple Residence 
District (RM) the following land: 

A parcel of land shown as parcel A on a plan entitl- 
ed "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass., prepared for 
Peter Demogenes, Inc.", dated April, 1978, by Em- 
mons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc. recorded with Mid- 
dlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 126. 
Plan 54, 

Bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Lit- 
tleton Road said point being 2177.04 feet along the 
Easterly line of said Littleton Road from the Easter- 
ly line of Hunt Road thence running: N 16 13 '19" 
W, 179.77 ft and; N 35 04 '03 " W, 583.55 ft by parcel 
3 shown on the aforementioned plan N 61 43 '30" 
E, 1.53 ft and; N 00 22 '39" W, 62.43 ft and; N 27 
29 '47 " E, 28.01 ft and; N 50 14 '53 " E, 168.75 ft and; 
N 51 25 '55 " E, 52.00 ft and; N 57 07 '55 " E, 72.22 
ft and; N 82 52 '55" E, 32.16 ft and; S 54 37 '36" 
E, 67.00 ft and; S 28 06'17"E, 140.32 ft and; S 30 
33'25"E, 109.54 ft and; S 18 04 '02" E, 65.97 ft and; 
S 21 14 '38 " E. 45.23 ft and; S 15 48 '36 " E. 120.84 
ft and; S 19 08 '21 " E, 40.84 ft and; S 38 33 '00" W, 
80.45 ft and; S 34 10'30"W, 93.28 ft and; S 26 51 11 
W, 69.48 ft and; S 42 02 '28 "E, 156.45 ft and by Land 
of the Town of Chelmsford to said Northerly line of 
Littleton Road and; S 54 47 '46" W. 150.00 ft by said 
Northerly line of Littleton Road to the point of begin- 
ning containing 5.632 acres; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly filed 
in the office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of reconstructing the following 
mentioned streets: 

(1) Sturbridge Drive 

(2) Matthew Lane 

(3) Penni Lane 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met; or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept Mon- 
moth Street as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk, and to raise and appropriate, or transfer 
from available funds, a certain sum of money for the pur- 
pose of reconstructing Monmoth Street, providing all the 
construction of the same meets with the requirements of 
the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding 
of any remaining bonds until such requirements have been 
met; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Locust Street as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the office 
of the Town Clerk, and to raise and appropriate, or transfer 
from available funds, a certain sum of money for the pur- 
pose of reconstructing Locust Street, providing all the con- 
struction of the same meets with the requirements of the 
Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any 
remaining bonds until such requirements have been met; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept Wig- 
gins Street as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
by their reports and plans duly filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, and to raise and appropriate , or transfer from 
available funds, a certain sum of money for the purpose 
of reconstructing Wiggins Street, providing all the con- 
struction of the same meets with the requirements of the 
Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any 
remaining bonds until such requirements have been met; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law Article I Administration and Procedure 
Section 1400 Planning Board by deleting Subsection 1425 
in its entirety and substituting the following: 

1425 — A special permit may be granted by the Plan- 
ning Board upon its determination that the 
following minimum standards have been met 
or exceeds: 

a. The requirements of Section 1520 — Special 
Permit Criteria. 

b. The applicable requirements of Section 4500 
— Major Business Complexes. 

c. Ingress/egress is in accordance with Section 
3144 — (Parking) and internal circulation is 
designed to control access to points of in- 
gress/egress using smooth flow of traffic. 



15 



Access from minor streets serving residential 
neighborhoods shall not be used unless the ap- 
plicant can clearly demonstrate a need for use 
of such road(s). 

Parking areas shall be screened to minimize 
floodlight and headlight glare and to confine 
vehicles to the parking area and to restrict 
them from using adjacent properties. As a 
minimum, parking shall be designed in ac- 
cordance with Section 3100 — Off-Street 
Parking and Loading and Section 3423 — 
(Screening). 

Adequate access to each structure for fire 
emergency and service equipment is provided. 
This shall mean that where possible, no park- 
ing shall be within 35 feet of the building and 
tht access shall be provided to all sides of the 
structure. 

Statements on the adequacy and availability 
of water and sanitary facilities for the pro- 
posed development, from the appropriate 
agency shall be submitted by the applicant. 

Storm drainage proposals conform to the re- 
quirements of the Chelmsford Subdivision 
Regulations. 

Major topographic changes or removal of ex- 
isting trees or other important natural ele- 
ments of the site will be minimized. All 
grading shall conform to Section 3410 — 
Grading. 

Effective use is made of the topography, land- 
scaping, building placement and building 
design to maintain to the degree feasible, the 
character of the neighborhood. A reasonable 
degree of compatibility between the proposed 
development and adjacent areas must be 
maintained. This will be done through the use 
of natural buffer-strips and screening; and 
through the location of like uses or like inten- 
sity along the boundary where other uses, par- 
ticularly residential uses, exist or are 
permitted. 

Along with the site plan, the applicant shall 
submit a certification by a registered profes- 
sional engineer that the proposal conforms to 
Section 3200 — Environmental Protection 
Standards. In addition, the applicant shall 
submit an affidavit acknowledging his under- 
standing of this standard and his or his suc- 
cessors continuing agreement to comply with 
it. 

The amount of parking is in conformance 
with Section 3100 — Off-Street Parking and 
Loading and where fifty (50) or more cars are 



to be located in a parking lot, raised planting 
strips, trees and landscape features shall be 
used to control traffic patterns across the 
paved areas. 

m. Pedestrian circulation is provided for within 
the development and there is a rational 
linkage of the system within the development 
to existing or potential circulation outside. 

n. That all other requirements of this By-Law 

applicable to the site plan have been satisfied. 

To the extent permitted by law, the effective date of 
this amendment shall be the date of approval of the 
amendment to the By-Laws by the Office of the At- 
torney General of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts as required by Chapter 40 Section 32; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law Article II. District Regulations Section 2500 
Intensity of Use Regulation, by deleting Subsection 2550 
in its entirety and substituting the following: 

2550 — Erection of More Than One Principal 
Building on a Lot 

No more than one principal residential building shall 
be permitted on a lot except in the case of motels, 
hotels, mobile home parks and multi -family struc- 
tures which shall be reviewed by the Planning Board 
in accordance with Section 1420 — Site Plan Review. 
In any commercial or industrial district, more than 
one principal building or structure may be erected 
or moved onto a lot provided that area, frontage, lot 
coverage and yard requirements can be met as though 
each structure were located on an individual lot, and 
provided that the plans therefore are reviewed by the 
Planning Board in accordance v/ith Section 1420; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law Article III General Regulations, Section 
2100 Off Street Parking and Loading Subsection 3120 
Number of Spaces by deleting the first paragraph in its 
entirety and substituting the following: 

3120 — Number of Spaces For the purpose of com- 
puting the parking requirements of difference uses, 
the number of spaces required shall be the largest 
whole number obtained after increasing all fractions 
upwards to one. Employees shall include the larger 
number of owners, managers, full and part-time 
workers, and volunteers that may be normally ex- 
pected on the premises during any single shift or por- 
tion thereof. The number of seats in benches, pews, 
or other continuous seating arrangements shall be 



16 



calculated at twenty inches for each seat. Parking 
spaces including isles shall be no less than 350 square 
feet per vehicle with a minimum width of 8.5 feet 
and a minimum length of 18 feet. The following 
minimum parking requirements shall apply to uses 
as listed below: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning by -Law Article II District Regulations, Section 
2300 Use Regulation Schedule — Residential Uses to read 
as follows: 

"Conversion of Dwellings" 
(see Section 2560) 

RA RB RC RM CA CB CC CD IA IS RMH CX 
OOPPOPOPPOOO 

or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations by deleting 
Section 20 Prohibition on Unauthorized Parking in 
Designated Handicapped Parking Spaces in Private or 
Public Ways in its entirety and substitute the following: 

Section 20. Prohibition on Unauthorized Parking 
in Designated Handicapped Spaces in Private or 
Public Ways. 

1. It shall be unlawful to park a motor vehicle in 
a parking space reserved and designated for use 
by vehicles of handicapped persons, whether 
located on public or private ways or properties, 
unless authorized to do so by the terms of this 
by-law or the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

2. A fine of $15.00 shall be imposed for the un- 
authorized parking of a motor vehicle in a space 
reserved and designated for use by vehicles of 
handicapped persons, pursuant to the authority 
of Chapter 90 . Section 20C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws. 

3. The Police Department and all members thereof 
assigned to traffic duty, are hereby authorized 
to remove and tow away, or have removed and 
towed away by commercial towing services, at the 
sole expense of the owner of said motor vehicle, 
any motor vehicle left unattended or parked in 
a parking space reserved and designated for use 
by a vehicle of a handicapped person, unless said 
vehicle shall be designated as a vehicle of a 
handicapped person. Motor vehicles so towed 
away shall be stored in a safe place and restored 
to the owner or operator thereof upon payment 
by the owner or operator of the expenses incur- 
red in said removal and storage. 



4. (a) The person or body that has lawful control 
of a public or private way or of improved or 
enclosed property used as off-street parking areas 
for businesses, shopping malls, theaters, audi- 
toriums, sporting or recreational facilities, cul- 
tural centers, residential dwellings, or for any 
other place where the public has a right of ac- 
cess as invitees or licensees shall reserve parking 
spaces in said off-street parking areas for any 
vehicle owned and operated by a handicapped 
person whose vehicle bears the distinguishing 
license plate authorized by section two of chapter 
ninety, according to the following formula; 

If the number of parking spaces in any such area 
is more than fifteen but not more than twenty- 
five, one parking space; more than twenty-five 
but not more than forty, five percent of such 
spaces but not less than two; more than forty but 
not more than one hundred, four percent of such 
spaces but not less than three; more than one 
hundred but not more than two hundred, three 
percent of such spaces but not less than four; 
more than two hundred but not more than five 
hundred, two percent of such spaces but not less 
than six; more than five hundred but not more 
than one thousand, one and one-half percent of 
such spaces but not less than ten; more than one 
thousand but not more than two thousand, one 
percent of such spaces but not less than fifteen; 
more than two thousand but less than five thou- 
sand, three-fourths of one percent of such spaces 
but not less than twenty; and more than five 
thousand, one-half of one percent of such spaces 
but not less than thirty. 

(b) Parking spaces designated as reserved under 
the provisions of paragraph (a) shall be identified 
by the use of above grade signs with white leter- 
ing against a blue background and shall bear the 
words "Handicapped Parking; Special Plate Re- 
quired. Unauthorized Vehicles May be Removed 
at Owner's Expense"; shall be as near as possible 
to a building entrance or walkway; shall be ad- 
jacent to curb ramps or other unobstructed 
methods permitting sidewalk access to a handi- 
capped person; and shall be twelve feet wide or 
two eight-foot wide areas with four feet of cross 
hatch between them. 

5. Violation of this By-Law shall be punishable as 
provided in General By-Law, Article I. 

6. In the absence of the operator of any motor vehi- 
cle violating any provisions of the By-Law, it shall 
be deemed that the registered owner of such vehi- 
cle was the operator. 

7. Any motor vehicle bearing a handicapped park- 
ing permit or motor vehicle registration plate 
designating the vehicle as one used by a handi- 
capped person shall be authorized to park in a 



17 



designated handicapped parking space. The 
Chief of Police, his designee, or the Town Clerk 
may issue a temporary handicapped Parking Per- 
mit to any person upon application with support- 
ing medical affidavit signed by a licensed 
physician designating the applicant as physically 
handicapped. Said temporary permit shall be 
issued with an expiration date not to exceed sixty 
(60) days from the date of issue and shall be dis- 
played in front right windshield of any vehicle 
parked in a designated handicapped parking 
space. 

8. The unauthorized use of a temporary permit 
shall be punishable by a fine of $50.00. 

9. Each day that any violation continues shall con- 
stitute a separate offense; 

of act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law and accompanying Zoning Map referred 
to therein to change from Adult Entertainment District 
(CX) to Multiple Residence District (RM) the following 
described parcels: 

PARCEL ONE 



110 + feet; Westerly through land of the Town of 
Chelmsford, 175 + feet. Containing, according to said 
plan, approximately 0.33±acres of land. 

Said Plan being filed with the Town Engineer and Plan- 
ning Board; or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law and accompanying Zoning Map referred 
to therein to change from Adult Entertainment District 
(CX) to General Residence District (RC) the following 
parcel: 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1986, 
being described as follows: 

Starting at a point located 160 + feet north of the 
northwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 
Northwesterly by land of the Lowell Sportsmen's Club, 
725 + feet; Southwesterly by land of the H.E. Fletcher 
Company, 445 + feet; Southeasterly through land of 
the Town of Chelmsford, 510 + feet; Northeasterly 
through land of the Town of Chelmsford, 305 + feet; 
Containing according to said plan, approximately 
4. 94 ± acres of land. 



The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows: 

Starting at a point located 35 ± west of the culvert 
in Scotty Hollow Brook; Northerly through land of 
the Town of Chelmsford 390 ± feet; Southwesterly of 
land of the H.E. Fletcher Company, 210±feet; South- 
erly by land of Hicks, 305 + feet; Northeasterly by 
land of Hicks, 175±feet; Containing, according to 
said plan, approximately 1. 33 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 660 ± feet southwest of 
the southwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 
Southeasterly by land of G. Abrahamson, 200 ± feet; 
Northeasterly by land of Smith, 30 ± feet; Northwest- 
erly by land of Sugden, 45 ± feet; Northerly by land 
of Sugden, 80 ± feet; Northeasterly by land of Sugden, 



Said plan being filed with the Town Engineer; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, to convey and transfer all right, title, and interest, if 
any, held by the Town in three (3) parcels being a portion 
of land at the property now or formerly known as the Swain 
Road Landfill and more particularly described as follows: 

PARCEL ONE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet; dated Mazrch 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 160 ± feet north of the 
northwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 
Northwesterly by land of the Lowell Sportsmen's Club, 
725 ± feet; Southwesterly by land of the H.E. Fletcher 
Company, 445 ± feet; Southeasterly through land of 
the Town of Chelmsford, 510 ± feet; Northeasterly 
through land of the Town of Chelmsford, 305 ±feet; 
Containing according to said plan, approximately 
4. 94 ± acres of land. 



18 



PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 35 ± feet west of the 
culvert in Scotty Hollow Brook; Northerly through 
land of the Town of Chelmsford 390 ± feet; Southwest- 
erly by land of the H.E. Fletcher Company, 210 ± feet; 
Southerly by land of Hicks, 305 ± feet; Northeasterly 
by land of Hicks, 175±feet; Containing, according 
to said plan, approximately 1. 33 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL THREE 

The land in Chelmsford. Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 feet; dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 660 ± feet southwest of 
the southwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 
Southeasterly by land of G. Abrahamson, 200±feet; 
Northeasterly by land of Smith, 30 ± feet: North- 
westerly by land of Sugden, 45±feet; Northerly by 
land of Sugden, 80±feet; Northeasterly by land of 
Sugden, 110 ± feet; Westerly through land of the Town 
of Chelmsford, 175 ± feet. Containing, according to 
said plan, approximately 0.33 ± acres of land. 

Said Plan being filed with the Town Engineer and Plan- 
ing Board; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



Northeasterly through land of F. Abrahamson & G. 
Abrahamson, 200±feet; Northwesterly by land of the 
Town of Chelmsford, 70 ± feet; Southwesterly by land 
of the Town of Chelmsford, by three courses, 
320 ± feet, 170 ± feet and 80 + feet; Westerly by land 
of the Town of Chelmsford, 55±feet. Containing, ac- 
cording to said plan, approximately 1.30 ± acres of 
land. 

PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass*', scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a utility pole along the west side of 
Swain Road located 100 ± feet north of the Town 
Landfill Old Access Road; Westerly through land of 
the Lowell Sportsmens Club, 620 ± feet; Northerly 
through land of the Lowell Sportsmens Club, 
245 ± feet; Westerly through land of the Lowell Sport- 
smens Club, 275 ± feet; Southeasterly by land of the 
Town of Chelmsford, 505 ± feet; Easterly by land of 
Sugden, 105±feet; Northeasterly by land of Sugden, 
230 ± feet; Southeasterly by land of Sugden, 
330±feer, Southeasterly by land of Sugden, 115±feet; 
Northerly by Swain Road by three courses, 140 ± feet; 
65 ± feet, 100 ± feet. Containing, according to said 
plan, approximately 4.55±acres of land. 

Said plan being on file with the Town Engineer and Plan- 
ning Board and, to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow a cer- 
tain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land 
for paying any damages which may be awarded as the result 
of any such taking or purchase; or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simiple, by pur- 
chase, by eminent domain or otherwise the following two 
parcels located at the property now or formerly known as 
the Swain Road Landfill and more particularly described 
as follows: 

PARCEL ONE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated approximately 1,800 feet in a 
westerly direction from Swain Road, being shown on 
a plan entitled "Compiled Sketch Plan of Land for 
the Town of Chelmsford, Mass", scale 1 inch = 100 
feet, dated March 16, 1985, being described as 
follows; 

Starting at a point located 70 ± feet east of the 
culvert in Scotty Hollow Brook; Southeasterly 
through land of Hicks, 110 ± feet; Northeasterly 
through land of Hicks and Leedburg, 390 ± feet; 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple by pur- 
chase by eminent domain, or otherwise, the property with 
the buildings thereon beginning at the most northwesterly 
corner of the parcel at the intersection of the lot line and 
the Lowell -Chelmsford boundary line, running along said 
lot line south 02 10 ' 00 " east two hundred thirty-three and 
97/100 (233.96') feet; 

Thence north 75 06 ' 16 " east one hundred fifty and 
63/100 (150.63') feet; 

Thence south 12 58 ' 35 " east seven hundred seven- 
teen and 78/100 (717.78') feet; 

Thence south 73 17 ' 25 " west twenty and 04/100 
(20.04') feet; 

Thence south 52 23 ' 46 " east six hundred thirty-one 
and 55/100 (631.55') feet; 



19 



Thence south 34 39 
(96.94') feet; 



24 " east ninety-six and 94/100 



Thence northeasterly along the boundary of U.S. 
Route 3 having a radius of 4,750 feet and length of 
1,435 ± feet to the intersection with the westerly 
boundary of Steadman Street; 

Thence northwesterly along the westerly boundary 
of Steadman Street approximately six hundred thirty- 
six (636 ' ± ) feet to the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary; 

Thence north 77 13 ' 56 " west approximately one 
thousand nine hundred (1,900 ' +) feet to the point 
of beginning, containing approximately 40.5 acres. 

and further shown as Parcel A on a certain plan on file 
with the Town Clerk and the Town Engineer, entitled 
"Resource Recovery Facility Taking prepared for the Town 
of Chelmsford, Massachusetts", scale 1" = 100 ', March 20, 
1985, by James E. Pearson, P.E., Chelmsford Town En- 
gineer, for the purpose of constructing, a resource recovery 
facility and to see if the Town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow a cer- 
tain sum of money to defray all necessary costs, fees and 
expenses in connection with the acquisition of said land 
and for paying any damages which may be awarded as the 
result of any such taking; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of preparing all documentation required for the design, 
and implementation of a resource recovery facility and fur- 
ther to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and 
execute all contracts and agreements, including intermuni- 
cipal agreements and agreements with private industry, for 
the purpose of construction, leasing and/or implementa- 
tion of said resource recovery facility and to act with the 
authority granted pursuant to Chapter 40D of the General 
Laws if deemed in the best interest of the Town, and fur- 
ther to authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute all 
necessary and proper contracts and agreements, and fur- 
ther to see if the Town will raise and appropriate, transfer 
of available funds or borrow a certain amount of money 
to defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Chelmsford, and the Zon- 
ing Map referred to therein, to change from Limited In- 
dustrial District (IA) to Special Industrial District (IS) the 
following described portion of land in Chelmsford begin- 
ning at the most northwesterly corner of the parcel at the 
intersection of the lot line and the Lowell-Chelmsford boun- 
dary line, running along said lot line south 02 10 ' 00 " east 
two hundred thirty-three and 97/100 (233.97 ') feet; 



Thence north 75 06 ' 16 " east one hundred firty and 
63/100 (150.63') feet; 

Thence south 12 58 ' 35 " east seven hundred seven- 
teen and 78/100 (717.78') feet; 

Thence south 73 17 ' 25 " west twenty and 04/100 
(20.04') feet; 

Thence south 52 23 ' 46 " east six hundred thirty-one 
and 55/100 (631.55 ') feet; 

Thence south 34 39 ' 24 " east ninety-six and 94/100 
(96.94') feet; 

Thence northeasterly along the boundary of U.S. 
Route 3, having a radiius of 4,750 feet and a length 
of 1,435 ±feet to the intersection with the westerly 
boundary of Steadman Street; 

Thence northwesterly along the westerly boundary 
of Steadman Street approximately six hundred thirty- 
six (636 ' ±) feet to the Lowell-Chelmsford boundary; 

Thence north 77 13 ' 56 " west approximately one 
thousand nine hundred (1,900 ' + ) feet to the point 
of beginning, containing approximately 40.5 acres, 
and further shown as parcel A on a certain plan on 
file with the Town Clerk, the Town Engineers and 
the Planning Board, entitled "Resource Recovery 
Facility Taking, Chelmsford, Massachusetts", scale 
1 " = 100 ' March 20, 1985, by James E. Pearson, P.E., 
Chelmsford Town Engineer, for the purpose of con- 
structing a resource recovery facility; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be determined 
to convey all right, title, and interest, if any held by the 
Town, in a parcel of land known as the North School and 
containing approximately 16.5 acres of land, more or less, 
and being a portion of property taken by the Town of 
Chelmsford by order of taking dated January 17, 1951, 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
in Book 1161, Page 258, for the exclusive and specific use 
of Elderly Housing; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain amount of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



20 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 28th day of March, A.D. 1985. 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready 

Paul C. Hart 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Roger Blomgren 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



March 28, 1985 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 
McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School, 
Small Gymnasium; seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, Constable of Chelmsford 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

April 29, 1985 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Gymnasium on Monday evening, the twenty-ninth day of 
April 1985, at 8:00 o'clock P.M., then and there to act upon 
the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money to the appropriate 
salary line items to fund approved wage and salary increases 
in the following departmental accounts: 



Accounting Department 
Assessors Department 
Board of Appeals 
Cemetery Department 
Conservation Commission 
Inspection Department 
Planning Board 
Public Buildings Department 
Registrars Department 
Town Clerk Department 
Treasurer/Collector Department 
Veterans Benefits Department 

and any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at Town Meeting; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of preparing all documentation required for the design, 
and implementation of a resource recovery facility and fur- 
ther to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and 
execute all contracts and agreements, including inter- 
municipal agreements and agreements with private in- 
dustry, for the purpose of construction, leasing and/or 
implementation of said resource recovery facility and to 
act with the authority granted pursuant to Chapter 40D 
of the General Laws if deemed in the best interest of the 
Town, and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
execute all necessary and proper contracts and agreements, 
and further to see if the Town will raise and appropriate, 
transfer of available funds or borrow a certain amount of 
money to defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 8th day of April, A.D. 1985. 

Bonita A. Towle, Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Vice Chairman 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 

Paul C. Hart, Member 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



April 12, 1985 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Congre- 
gational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 



21 



McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School, 
Small Gymnasium; seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, Constable of Chelmsford 



22 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 6, 1985 



♦indicates candidate for re-election 



SELECTMAN 3 yrs. (2) 
John P. Emerson. Jr.* 
Bonita A. Towle* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



100 


52 


100 


41 


77 


79 


52 


64 


49 


65 


66 


70 


815 


82 


48 


86 


58 


83 


81 


45 


67 


44 


63 


64 


59 


780 









































60 


40 


64 


29 


50 


74 


35 


63 


55 


84 


42 


53 


649 



140 



250 



128 



172 



ASSESSOR 3 yrs. 
James H. McBride* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



93 


52 


100 


49 


82 


87 


46 


63 


51 


62 


61 


73 


819 









































28 


18 


25 


15 


23 


30 


20 


34 


23 


44 


25 


18 


303 



70 



125 



64 



105 



117 



66 



97 



106 



86 



BOARD OF HEALTH MEMBER 4 yrs. 
Paul F. McCarthy' 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



99 


58 


100 


50 


82 


88 


56 


72 


51 


65 


66 


69 


856 









































22 


12 


25 


14 


23 


29 


10 


25 


23 


41 


20 


22 


266 



121 



70 



125 



64 



105 



117 



66 



97 



106 



86 



1122 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE MEMBER 3 yrs. 
Nicholas Gavriel' 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 yrs. 
Everett V. Olsen' 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



92 


46 


85 


46 


70 


85 


34 


53 


48 


62 


60 


61 


742 























1 











1 


2 


29 


24 


40 


18 


35 


32 


32 


43 


26 


44 


26 


29 


378 


121 


70 


125 


64 


105 


117 


66 


97 


74 


106 


86 


91 


1122 


91 


57 


96 


53 


82 


91 


59 


68 


52 


65 


69 


68 


851 









































30 


13 


29 


11 


23 


26 


7 


29 


22 


41 


17 


23 


271 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 yrs. 
Ruth K. Delaney' 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 yrs. (2) 

Mark W Caulhier 

Susan C. Cantin 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER 3 yrs. 
Robert L. Wetmore* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD 3 yrs. (3) 

Charles A. Parlee' 

Roselind M. Boyle' 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSIONER 3 yrs. 

Stephen M. Curran 

Barry B. Balan 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



92 


62 


104 


51 


84 


96 


52 


69 


53 


71 


72 


69 


875 









































29 


- 


21 


13 


21 


21 


14 


28 


21 


35 


14 


22 


247 


121 


70 


125 


64 


105 


117 


66 


97 


74 


106 


86 


91 


1122 


94 


45 


91 


44 


69 


77 


46 


58 


45 


59 


60 


62 


750 


82 


48 


102 


49 


76 


75 


46 


67 


49 


70 


66 


62 


792 









































66 


47 


57 


35 


65 


82 


40 


69 


54 


83 


46 


58 


702 



242 



363 



140 



210 



250 



128 



210 



234 



132 



194 



212 



172 



375 



192 



315 



351 



198 



291 



222 



318 



258 



125 



64 



105 



117 



66 



97 



182 2244 



89 


55 


91 


45 


78 


86 


53 


71 


47 


66 


68 


66 


815 









































32 


15 


34 


19 


27 


31 


13 


26 


27 


40 


18 


25 


307 


121 


70 


125 


64 


105 


117 


66 


97 


74 


106 


86 


91 


1122 


93 


49 


91 


43 


84 


77 


46 


55 


42 


63 


56 


67 


766 


76 


43 


89 


42 


78 


69 


42 


58 


40 


62 


51 


58 


708 


74 


41 


86 


42 


73 


74 


46 


55 


43 


62 


56 


59 


711 









































120 


77 


109 


65 


80 


131 


64 


123 


97 


131 


95 


89 


1181 



273 3366 



51 


35 


54 


19 


56 


48 


35 


38 


12 


50 


32 


42 


472 


65 


31 


69 


40 


45 


66 


29 


58 


61 


50 


52 


45 


611 









































5 


4 


2 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


1 


6 


2 


4 


39 



QUESTION 

Yes 

No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



69 


41 


78 


39 


60 


75 


37 


52 


37 


70 


52 


60 


680 


33 


13 


22 


17 


24 


21 


22 


22 


20 


17 


20 


23 


254 


19 


16 


25 


8 


21 


21 


7 


23 


17 


19 


II 


8 


I'lH 



125 



64 



105 



117 



66 



97 



1122 



23 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 29, 1985 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized the 
presence of a quorum, at the McCarthy Junior High Gym. 

Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Ready 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

George Ripsom, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
moved to recess the Annual Town Meeting at 7:43 PM, in 
order to conduct a Public Budget Hearing of Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds. Motion carried, unanimously. 

George Ripsom discussed the Federal Revenue Sharing. 
The sum of $700,000.00 will be available for use in fiscal 
year 1985-1986, and will be allocated as follows: Fire 
Department Salaries $300,000.00, Police Department 
Salaries $300,000.00. The Highway Department Expenses 
will be $100,000.00. These amounts will be reflected in the 
department's budgets. The sum of $700,000.00 represents 
approximately 80 <J on the tax rate. The Moderator asked 
for any discussion or questions, hearing none George Rip- 
som moved to have the Town Meeting Body accept for ap- 
proval the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds amounts as 
presented. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator reconvened the Annual Town Meeting 
at 7:50 PM. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the reports of Town Officers and Committees be heard. 

Selectman Ready moved to hear nominations from the 
floor for the Varney Playground Commission. Motion Car- 
ried. Selectman Ready moved to nominate Bernard Bat- 
tles for a three year term. The Moderator asked for any 
more nominations from the floor, hearing none, the Moder- 
ator declared that nominations were closed. The Moderator 
than asked for a voice vote on Bernard Battles as commis- 
sioner for three years. It was so voted. 

The Moderator then explained the procedure of the 
Town Meeting rules of order. If a voter/or official wanted 
to amend an article then they must do so in writing with 
the Town Clerk. Then the voter/official could explain to 
the Town Meeting Body the purpose of their amendment. 
Voice votes would be taken, and if necessary, hand counts 
would be taken, if passed then another vote would be re- 
quired on the article as amended. He asked for co- 
operation from the Town Meeting Body and the Officials 
to keep the length of debate at a minimum. He then ex- 
plained the procedure required for moving the question 
which is to stop debate. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Chairman of the Personnel Board, 
Alan Murphy explained the article. The Board had done 
surveys with surrounding area town's like Chelmsford, and 
decided to drop the fifteen steps and twenty grade levels 
on the present salary schedule to eight grade levels, and 
eleven steps. The town employee's left under the Personnel 
Board's jurisdiction did not have any salaries which fell into 
a lot of the grades and steps of the original schedule due 
to this fact the board at this time felt the need was there 
to update the schedule. George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee moved to accept all of article two but wanted 
to amend the article to reflect the original schedule of fif- 
teen steps and twenty grade levels. Alan Murphy spoke 
against the motion. A voice vote was taken, motion 
defeated. A voice vote was taken on article two motion car- 
ried. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Alan Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wages and 
Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 1985, as follows: 

1. Under Section 6, "Classification of Present Town Em- 
ployees", amend Subsection (E)— "Wage and Salary 
Schedule" by deleting the existing schedule and sub- 
stituting the following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1985-JUNE 30, 1986 



Grade Level 

1A 
IB 
1C 
ID 

2 
3 
4 
5 



Salary Range 

$11,490-14,305 
12,988-16,170 
14,486-18,035 
17,483-21,766 
21,979-27,364 
29,473-36,694 
33,970-42,293 
38,467-47,891 



2. Under Section 6 substitled Classification of Present 
Town Employees, delete Subsection D. and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(D) The wage and salary schedule shall be maintain- 
ed by the following criteria: 

I. There shall be eight salary grade levels desig- 
nated 1A, IB, 1C, ID, 2, 3, 4, 5. 

II. The minimum salary for each salary grade 
shall be determined by the Personnel Board. 

III. The maximum salary for each salary grade 
will be 1,245 times the minimum salary for 
that grade. 

IV. There are 11 steps in each salary grade. Each 
incremental step is 2.45% of the minimum 
salary for that grade. 



24 



V. The wage and salary schedule will be stated 
in annual dollars. 

VI. Hourly rates for those jobs that are paid on 
an hourly basis will be the annual salary 
dividend by 2,088 (52.2 weeks times 40 
hours) for jobs designated "Mechanical and 
Construction, Conservation and Cemeteries, 
Custodian and Health" and will be the an- 
nual salary dividend by 1957.5 (52.2 weeks 
x 37.5) for jobs designated Administrative 
and Clerical. 

3. Under Section 8 subtitled Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions, delete paragraph (B) and 
substitute the following in its place: 

(B) Any employee who is at step 1 or above may be 
advanced to a higher step on the first day of the 
fiscal year. Such increases are to be based on the 
employee's job performance and development 
during the previous year. Performance evalua- 
tions for all employees must be submitted to the 
Personnel Board by the first day in May. In- 
creases greater than one step must be presented 
in person by the employee's Department Head 
or equivalent to the Personnel Board. Employees 
who are at the maximum of their salary grade 
may also be eligible for a one step merit increase 
upon approval of the Personnel Board. 

4. Under Section 16 subtitled Sick Leave, delete para- 
graph (C) and substitute the following in its place: 

(C) Accrued sick leave will be paid at the time of 
retirement, or at death to the employee's surviv- 
ing spouse, or, if none, to the Representative of 
the employee's Estate, to the maximum extent of 
120 days. 

5. Under Section 26 subtitled Bereavement and 
Funeral Leave, delete paragraph (A) and substitute 
the following in its place: 

(A) All full time permanent employees covered by 
this plan shall be entitled to leave without loss 
of pay not to exceed (3) days in the event of the 
death of the employee's spouse, children, parents, 
grandparents, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sibl- 
ings, and grandchildren. 

Selectmanm Ready moved at this time to recess the An- 
nual Town Meeting in order to proceed with the Special 
Town Meeting which was posted to begin at 8:00 PM. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

April 29, 1985 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order by the 
Moderator, there were 441 voters present at the McCarthy 
Junior High Gym. 

Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman Ready 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waiv- 
ed. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectmen Ready explained that 
these figures presented before the Town Meeting body were 
as a result of the Town Hall union negotiations contract. 
The Employee's had been without a contract since July 1, 
1984 and recommended passage. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. James Doukszewicz Treasurer/ 
Tax Collector spoke in favor. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. The Article reads 
as follows: 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Dennis Ready, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from the Reserve Fund 
the sum of twenty-nine thousand eight hundred twenty- 
one (S29.821.00), to be transferred to the following salary 
and expense line items in the indicated specific amounts 
to fund approved wage and salary increases and expense 
allocations in the following departmental accounts: 



Accounting Department: 
Line Item #1. — Salaries 

Board of Appeals: 
Line Item #6. — Expense 

Assessors Department: 
Line Item #7. — Salaries 

Cemetery Department: 
Line Item #11. — Salaries 

Conservation Commission: 
Line Item #17. — Expense 

Inspection Department: 
Line Item #48. — Salaries 

Planning Board: 

Line Item #65. — Expense 

Public Buildings Department: 
Line Item #73. -Salaries 

Registrars Department: 
Line Item #80. — Salaries 



$ 1,890 
874 
2,971 
3,211 
1,311 
2,200 
1,907 
2,969 
1,881 



Town Clerk Department: 
Line Item #94. — Salaries 



3,296 



25 



Town Treasurer/Collector Department: 
Line Item #97. — Salaries 

Veterans Benefits Department: 
Line Item #106. — Salaries 



6,300 



1,011 



$29,821 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Ready explained the 
purpose of this article. Due to the need of questions that 
needed answers and the question of legal rights, the Board 
of Selectmen felt that the Town should be made aware of 
everything possible before any decisions are made. After 
a lengthy discussion, Leo Paradis moved to amend the ar- 
ticle, he felt that the present wording was too involved, if 
basically all the Board was trying to do was to hire people 
for obtaining information. He felt that certain words made 
it sound like a permanent contract. His wording was sub- 
mitted as an amendment. The Moderator asked for fur- 
ther discussion, hearing none he asked for a voice vote on 
the motion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for 
a voice vote on the main motion as amended, motion car- 
ried, the article reads as follows: 

Selectman Ready moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of preparing all documentation required for the design of 
a resource recovery facility, and further to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to execute all necessary and proper 
contracts and agreements, and further I move that the 
Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the amount of twenty- 
five thousand five hundred dollars ($25,000.00) to defray 
all necessary costs, fees and expenses. 

The Moderator reconvened the Annual Town Meeting 
at 8:30 PM. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A. Chairman of the Personnel 
Board, Alan Murphy explained that this article reflects the 
new step scale on Town Employee's as per article 2. George 
Ripsom moved that the Gas Inspector under "other posi- 
tions" be amended to read the salary of $7,000.00 p. a. in- 
stead of the figure $6,000.00. The Moderator asked for any 
discussion, hearing none asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for a voice 
vote on the article as amended, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Personnel Board, Alan Murphy, mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law by further amended Section 24, Job Titles 
and Standard rates for wages and salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
By-Law, to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town 
with certain labor organizations, pursuant to General Law 
Chapter 150E, and to reflect current salaries and grade 
levels under the Personnel By-law as follows: 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Executive Secretary 

2. Town Accountant 



7/85 - 8/86 

Proposed 

Level 

4 
3 



Proposed 
Salary 



3. Veteran's Agent 2 

4. Town Aide 2 

5. Assistant to Assessors ID 

6. Assistant Town Clerk ID 

7. Assistant Treasurer ID 

8. Clerk, Senior 1C 

9. Clerk. Junior 1A 

10. Clerk. Part-Time 1A 

11. Town Counsel $500 PA. 

12. Board of Reg.. Three Members 360 PA. 

13. Assistant Town Accountant ID 

CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 2 

2. Supt of Inspect & Pest Control - 1,250 PA. 

3. Landscaper— Park 1A 

4. Laborer— Park 1A 

5. Unskilled Laborer #2. #4 

6. Skilled Forest Workman — Conservation ... . 1A 

7. Equipment Operator 1C 

8. Park Superintendent 2 

CUSTODIAL 

1. Custodian IB 

LIBRARY 

1. Library Director 3 

2. Library Department Head ID 

3. Library Specialist 1C 

4. Library Assistant IB 

5 Library Clerk 1A 

6. Maintenance Assistant IB 

7. Page #2, #4 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 3 

2 . Highway Foreman 2 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Department #2, #5 

2. Deputy Fire Chief #2 

3. Captain #2 

4. Mechanic (Fire and Police) #2 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. Police Chief 5 

2. Deputy Chief 4 

3. Captain 3 

RECREATION 

1. Director/ Youth Center Coordinator 2 

2. Clerk, Part-Time 1A 

3. Waterfront Director 1A 

4. Swimming Instructor 1A 

5. Lifeguard 1A 

6. Playground Supervisor IB 

7. Recreation Specialist 1A 

8. Recreation Leader 1A 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 1C 

10. Youth Center Leaders 1A 

OTHER POSITIONS 

1. Building Inspector 3 

2. Electric Inspector 2 

3. Local Inspector 2 

4. Gas Inspector #2 J7.000 PA. 

5 Dog Officer 1C 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 1A 

7. Van Driver IB 

8. Sealer of Weights & Measures #2 J2.000 PA. 

9. Animal Inspector #2 J1.000 PA. 

10 Clock Winder #2 J 200 PA. 

11. Town Engineer 3 

FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 
#2 - Not in "Job Rating Plan" 
#4— Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5— Salary will be 200% of the highest paid Union Firefighters established by 
State Law; 

Selectman Ready made a motion to take article six out 
of order. This article pertains to the retired Town 



26 



Employee's health insurance premiums. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the motion. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Ready moved that the 
Town vote to pay an additional or subsidiary rate in addi- 
tion to the payment of fifty percent of premium for con- 
tributory group life, hospital and surgical, medical, dental 
and other health insurance for employees retired from the 
service of the Town, and their dependents, in the same pro- 
portion as the Town pays said additional or subsidiary rates 
for active Town employees. 

Selectman Ready explained that presently the Town pays 
60% of the Town Employee's insurance, 50% of the retired 
Town Employee's insurance. The Board felt that all the 
employee's should receive the same paid benefit's of 60% 
regardless if they are retired or not. The Finance Commit- 
tee was not in favor of the article. They felt that the retired 
employee's should not benefit from what the regular em- 
ployee's receive through union negotiations, etc. Selectman 
Ready disagreed with this theory. Many of the retired em- 
ployee's gave twenty or more years of service to the Town, 
and he felt that this was a small token of appreciation that 
they deserved to receive, they made the Town what it is to- 
day. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion, 
motion carried. George Ripsom questioned the voice vote, 
the following tellers came forward, and a hand count was 
taken: 

Edward Marshall William Drury Richard Burtt 

Bonnie Farragut Carl Olsson Robert Charpentier 

Margaret Johnson Roger Schneider John Warren 

Leslie Koresky Karen Wharton John Upshur 

Result of the hand count: Yes 200 No 105 motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Finance Committee Chairman, 
George Ripsom discussed the contents of the budget with 
the Town Meeting Body. The Moderator explained that 
he would be reading the fiscal year 1986 budget request 
column in the warrant book. These figures would at times 
be different from the Finance Committee's recommenda- 
tion figures, at which time the Finance Committee would 
make a recommendation to amend. The Moderator then 
read the Accounting Department through the Assessors' 
Department, asking for discussion after each one. Under 
the Assessors' budget Alan Murphy of the Personnel Board 
stated that his board did make a salary survey of the elected 
officials salaries, and made their recommendation to the 
Finance Committee. Mr. Murphy asked to hear the Finance 
Committe's recommendation at this time on the elected of- 
ficials salaries, which included the Assessors' Tax Collec- 
tor/Treasurer, and Town Clerk. Mr. Ripsom explained the 
the Finance Committee did not agree with the elected of- 
ficials salaries recommendation by the Personnel Board, 
and wanted the three elected officials to receive over the 
next three years a lock step increase which would be given 
to the "position" not the official. This would be the base 
increase, not including the cost of living and at the end 
of the three years be on an equal pay scale. He then recom- 
mended the Assessor's salaries line item 7 be S113.720.00 



for a total budget figure of $176,921. James Doukszewicz, 
Treasurer/Tax Collector spoke against the motion to 
amend. Mr. Doukszewicz felt that rather than wait and 
discuss the salary question on his budget, he would do so 
now. He did his own salary survey and found that the Per- 
sonnel Board's survey did not reflect the most current rate 
of pay for officials in the surrounding Towns. His was done 
two weeks ago. He submitted rates to the Finance Com- 
mittee when he presented his budget. He couldn's under- 
stand why the Finance Committee would not accept the 
Personnel Board's recommendation for the elected officials, 
but went the other way from what the Personnel Board 
recommended for the Executive Secretary's salary by giv- 
ing the position 56,000. more a year. At this time this posi- 
tion is unfilled and the Finance Committee doesn't even 
know when it will be filled. When it comes to his budget 
the Treasurer said he would at that time amend his budget 
to read what he originally requested. Pennryn Fitts of the 
Personnel Board stated that the Personnel Board agreed 
with the Finance Committee to equalize the pays of the 
elected officials, and felt that the Treasurer's budget should 
be voted on prior to any of the other elected officials 
budget. He then asked for the Finance Committee to with- 
draw their motion on the Assessor's budget. After that, Mr. 
Fitts would move to hear the Treasurer's budget. George 
Ripsom tabled his motion at the present time. Pennryn Fitts 
moved to take the Treasurer's budget out of order, motion 
defeated by voice vote. The Moderator questioned the vote 
and asked for a show of hands, motion carried. James 
Doukszewicz, Treasurer Tax Collector then presented his 
budget which included the total salaries line item 107 as 
S143.417.00 for a total budget figure of $169,143. He felt 
that the Finance Committee last year asked the Personnel 
Board for a recommendation of his salary for this year, and 
chose to ignore it. Mr. Doukszewicz himself gave the 
Finance Committee his survey and again they failed to go 
by it. He felt that they should conduct their own or choose 
to use the Personnel Board's for everyone, not just a chosen 
few. He asked the Town Meeting Body to vote his budget 
with his recommendation of figures, because his budget 
reflected the most up to date surveys of salary figure. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the Treasurer because the 
Finance Committee did state last year at Town Meeting that 
they would go by the Personnel Board's recommendation 
for this year. After more lengthy discussion the Finance 
Committee moved to amend the budget to read: 
S141.277.00 under salaries for a total of $167,003.00. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, 
which left the chair in doubt he then asked for a show of 
hands, motion defeated. He asked for further discussion, 
hearing none he returned to the Assessor's budget. At this 
lime he explained that the final vote will be taken at the 
end of the entire budget. The procedure which is being 
followed is opening the floor up for discussion on the in- 
dividual recommended figures of the budget. The vote at 
the end of article three will include all the figures recom- 
mended and amended. 

The Moderator returned to the Assessor's Department 
and the Finance Committee's motion for the budget to read 
S176.921. this figure reflects the salary figure of $113,720.00 
Chairman of the Board of Assessors' Janet Lombard, spoke 



27 



against the change in the salary figure. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote on the motion to amend, which left the 
chair in doubt, he then asked for a show of hands, still in 
doubt, he asked the tellers to come forward and conducted 
a hand count. The result of the hand count: Yes 102 No 
167, motion defeated to amend. 

The Moderator then read the Cemetery Department 
through the Constable's budget reading the recommended 
figure. Under the Council on Aging/Town Aide budget 
Selectman Ready moved to amend the expenses line item 
22. from 24,190. to 29,190. an increase of $5,000. for a 
total of $78,393. Selectman Ready asked the Town Aide 
Kathleen Robinson to speak to the Town Meeting Body 
about the increase. Due to the fact that Mrs. Robinson was 
not a resident/registered voter in Chelmsford, the 
Moderator had to ask permission from the Town Meeting 
Body for Mrs. Robinson to speak. Motion carried, by voice 
vote. Mrs. Robinson explained that this money was for a 
fund raising campaign. Which will be appropriated to the 
Friends of the Senior Center, a private non-profit group 
which will appeal to the community privately to raise 
money for the different activities of the Senior center. 
Respite Care program etc. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to amend, motion carried. 



repair the P. A. System. The Meeting recessed at 10:20 PM. 
The Moderator reconvened the meeting at 10:30 PM. the 
PA. system was still not working, the Moderator attemp- 
ted to continue the meeting, but the Town Meeting Body 
could not hear him. A motion was made by Norman 
LaBrecque to adjourn the meeting until Monday, May 6th, 
at 7:30 PM same location. Voice vote was taken by the 
Moderator, motion carried. The meeting adjourned at 
10:35 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



The Moderator than read from the Debt and Interest 
through the Fire Department's Budget. Under the Health 
Department, George Ripsom moved to amend the budget 
to read a total of $104,143. Which reflects the salaries line 
item 36 to read $91,902. He then discussed why the salary 
figure should be $91,092. He felt that the employee's were 
receiving a 2 V£ % increase plus the 5 % cost of living within 
this new figure. Paul McCarthy, a member of the Board 
of Health, spoke against the motion to amend. He stated 
that the Finance Committee was in fact decreasing the 
Ass't. Director's salary not increasing it. He felt that the 
Ass't. Director was in fact doing a tremendous job and 
should be paid accordingly. Because the clerical staff is not 
part of the union within the Town Hall, the Board was re- 
questing the same amount that the union positions were 
receiving. The Board of Selectmen asked the Town Meeting 
Body to defeat the motion to amend. Norman LeBrecque 
spoke in favor of the motion to amend. After a lengthy 
discussion, the Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried to amend. Hearing no need for further discussion 
the Moderator went onto the Highway Department. The 
Finance Committee asked to table this budget momentarily 
while figures were gathered for discussion. During this time, 
Selectman Ready moved to reconsider the Health Depart- 
ment, because of the fact that the Ass't. Director's salary 
as amended was in fact decreased, he felt that more discus- 
sion under the salaries line item 36 should take place. The 
Finance Committee felt rather than reinstate the whole 
salary figure, just the Ass't. Director's salary should be con- 
sidered. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to reconsider, which left the chair in doubt, he then 
asked for a show of hands, still in doubt, he called the tellers 
forward and requested a hand count. When the Moderator 
went to announce the figures of Yes 153 No 91, motion car- 
ried to reconsider the Health Department Budget, he an- 
nounced a ten minute recess while the technician tried to 



28 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 6, 1985 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:35 PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, at 
the McCarthy Junior High School Gym. There were 382 
voters present. 

The Moderator took a moment to speak about Clement 
McCarthy, former Town Counsel, who had passed away on 
Saturday, May 4th. Clem had attended numerous Town 
Meeting's both as the Town Counsel and as a private citizen. 
And many times presented his opinions. The Moderator 
asked the Town Meeting Body to at some time during the 
meeting take a moment and think about Clem McCarthy. 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee then ex- 
plained about the remaining budget articles. The Board 
of Selectmen and the Finance Committee agreed upon the 
figures which were going to be presented at this meeting, 
along with the Town Accountant. 

The Moderator then reviewed the last motion of the 
April 29th meeting. The motion was made to reconsider 
the Board of Health Budget and carried by a voice vote, 
Yes 153 No 91. He then explained that we were going 
through article three line by line the final vote will be taken 
at the end of the article, but discussions will be heard if 
necessary at each line item. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 con't. Board of Health Budget dis- 
cussion. Selectman Ready asked the Town Meeting Body 
to support the figure of $97,448 under line item 36 salaries. 
Peter Dulchinos, member of the Board of Health, spoke 
about the staff and explained the individual positions, and 
said that it would not be fair to give a raise to one par- 
ticular individual and not to all of the personnel. Discus- 
sion took place, George Ripsom moved to amend the figure 
of $91,092. to $93,213, which would reflect a 5% increase 
for cost of living plus the 1Vi% merit raise. This is based 
on the raises approved for those employee's under the Per- 
sonnel Board. Paul McCarthy, member of the Board of 
Health, spoke against this motion. After more discussion, 
the Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion by 
George Ripsom to amend the amendment to read $93,213. 
Motion carried. Selectman Blomgren spoke against the 
figure of $93,213. and asked the Town Meeting Body to 
defeat this motion and to go with the figure of $111,499., 
and made a motion to move the question, to stop debate. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote, which requires an 
unanimous vote, or a %'s hand count. The chair had to 
conduct a hand count the following tellers came forward: 



John Warren 
Jane Drury 
Ruth Delaney 
Steve Jones 



Edward Marshall 
Walter Mellen 
Margaret Johnson 
John Hibbard 



hand count result: Yes 271 no 23 %'s required which would 
be 196, motion carried. 



The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend with a figure of $93,213. Motion defeated. The 
Moderator was questioned about the vote, he asked for a 
show of hands, motion defeated. The Board of Health's 
total budget is $111,499. 

The Moderator read the Highway Department's figures. 
The Finance Committee moved to amend the figures in 
all the line items: Line Item 40 Salaries from $550,041 to 
$498,614, Line Item 41 Expenses from $324,494 to 
$424,494, and Snow and Ice from $320,000 to $270,000 
minus the $100,000 from revenue sharing for a total net 
budget of $1,093,108. The Selectmen agreed with the 
amendment, and a voice vote was taken, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator read the Historical Budget and then the 
Hydrant Service where a discussion took place. Thomas 
Firth moved to amend the budget to read line 45 North 
from $12,250 to $19,300 and line 46 East from $3,500 to 
$7,000 for a total budget of $78,350. Leslie Adams spoke 
about the North's Hydrant Service. The Finance Commit- 
tee was in favor of the East's figure, but not the North's. 
Spotwood Bowers moved to amend the amendment to read 
$7,000. for East and $12,250. for North. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. The Moderator 
then asked for a voice vote on the figures of $19,300 and 
$7,000. which left the chair in doubt, he asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried. 

The Moderator read the Insect Pest budget through to 
the Library Department where discussion took place. Myra 
Silver of the Finance Committee moved to amend Line item 
58. Salaries from $321,422 to $330,702. This is a result of 
the Personnel Board's salary chart change voted under ar- 
ticle 2A. This change would reflect a total budget of 
$467,260. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator read his budget through the Police 
Department's budget, where discussion took place: Cheryl 
Boss, of the Finance Committee, moved that the Salaries 
figures line item 70 be changed from $1,947,067 to 
$1,944,183. which will give a net budget of $1,847,852. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator read from the Public Buildings budget 
through the School Department budget, where a discus- 
sion took place. George Ripsom of the Finance Commit- 
tee moved to amend the Net Cost of this department's 
budget from $17,886,684. to $17,806,363. this is due to the 
reimbursement funds of the Capital Improvement. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Selectman Ready moved to return to the Insurance 
Department budget, as the passage of Article 6 increased 
the budget by $11,000., which must be added to the line 
item of Chapter 32B figure for a total of $973,918, which 
will give a total budget figure of $1,374,578. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote, motion carried, unanimously. 



29 



The Moderator read from the Sewer Commission 
through the Veteran's Benefits Department where a discus- 
sion took place. Selectman Ready moved that the Salaries 
line item 116 be amended from $41,465 to $42,154. This 
is to reflect an increase for the Ass't. Veteran's Agent, which 
will give a total budget figure of $99,505. Norman LaBrec- 
que questioned this position, he said it is not listed under 
the Personnel Board's listing under Article 2 A. George Rip- 
som explained that this was as a result of the Town Hall 
Union contract negotiations. And that it is a union posi- 
tion not Personnel Board's. Sandar Kilburn, Town Hall 
union negotiator, explained that this in fact was not a union 
position. The person was a union member prior to the 
changing of the title. Alan Murphy of the Personnel Board 
explained that the Personnel Board has not yet seen a job 
description of the position, monies could be voted, however, 
the Personnel Board must approve the position before any 
monies can be released. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to amend, motion carried. 



Department Line Items 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

1. Salaries 

2 . Expenses 

3. Outlay 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPT 



Approved 
Appropriations 



$84,717 

1,900 

600 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

4. Inspectors Salary 

5. Expense 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPT 



87,217 



1,000 
400 



1,400 



The Moderator read the Waste Collection's budget. 
Under the Unclassified Department, a number of motions 
were made to amend. Selectman Ready moved to amend 
Line item 121 Ambulance Serivice from $0.00 to read 
$1.00, voice vote taken, motion carried unanimously. Nor- 
man LaBrecque moved to amend line item 122 Cable TV 
Committee from $3,100 to $2,500, after much discussion 
the Moderator asked for a voice vote. Motion defeated. 
George Ripsom moved that the line item 124 be amended 
from $950,000 to $937,000. Voice vote taken, motion car- 
ried to amend the County Retirement Assessment, 
unanimously. Under line item 125, Cultural Council, 
Marion Gould moved that the figure be amended from 
$1,00 to $100.00. A voice vote was taken motion carried. 
Under line item 136 Retirement Reserve Fund the Finance 
Committee moved to amend the figure from $50,000. to 
$0.00. This is a cushion for future Town Employees who 
may retire. However, if the amount is not there the Coun- 
ty will assess an amount the following year. A voice vote 
was taken which left the Chair in doubt, the Moderator 
asked for a show of hand, still in doubt the tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken Yes 115 No. 144, mo- 
tion defeated. The Moderator read the rest of the line items 
and George Ripsom moved to reconsider line item 136, 
Retirement Reserve Fund. The Town cannot afford at this 
time to have this money set aside. After much discussion, 
a voice vote was taken, motion to amend the line item from 
$50,000. to $0.00 carried. The Moderator then read the 
total unclassified budget figure of $1,080,691. The 
Moderator then read the motion, asked for a voive vote 
motion carried, under article three and reads as follows: 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

6 . Expenses 

ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT 

7. Salaries 

8. Expenses 

9. Outlay 

10. Legal Services 

11. Revaluation Update 

TOTAL ASSESSORS DEPT. 



5,200 



121,000 

42,800 

1 

5,000 

15,400 

184,201 



James Doukszewicz, Tax Collector/Treasurer, moved that 
the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $30,303,784.00 
to defray Town Charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1985 to June 30, 1986. 



30 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 




12 Salaries 


112,429 


13. Expenses 


21,763 


14. Out of State 


500 


15. Outlay 


550 


TOTAL CEMETERY DEPT. 


135,242 


TRANSFER FROM P/C INTEREST 


15,000 


NET COST CEMETERY DEPT. 


120,242 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

16 . Expenses 

17. Outlay 

TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

18. Salaries 

19. Expenses 

TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



6,210 



11.260 



CONSTABLE 




20. Salary 


150 


COUNCIL ON AGING/TOWN AIDE 




21. Salaries 


49,203 


22. Expenses 


29,190 



TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING/TOWN AIDE 78,393 



DEBT AND INTEREST: 
PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS: 

Westland and Harrington Elem. Schools 
Byam Elem. School 
School Building Capital Impro. #5 
School Computer Purchase #2 

23. Total Principal 



155.000 
100,000 
715.000 
133.965 



1.103.965 



INTEREST PAYMENTS: 

Anticipation of rev. and other temp, loans 200,000 

Westland and Harrington Elem. Schools 16,340 

Byam Elem. School 27,000 

School Building Capital Improv. #5 49,650 

School Computer Purchase 7.436 

24. Total Interest 300.336 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 1.404.301 



DOG OFFICER 




25. Salaries 


24,176 


26. Expenses 


2,000 


27. Pound Rental 


6,000 


28. Care of Live Animals 


1,200 


TOTAL DOG OFFICER DEPT. 


33.376 



EDWARD'S MEMORIAL BEACH 

29. Expenses 

ELECTIONS 

30. Wages and Expenses 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

31. Expenses 



1.000 



14,275 



1,500 



1,966,057 

102,518 

1 

7,685 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

32. Salaries 

33. Expenses 

34. Out of State 

35. Outlay 

TOTAL FIRE DEPT. 2,076,261 

APPROPRIATION FROM REVENUE SHARING 
FOR SALARIES 300,000 

NET COST FIRE DEPT. 1,776,261 



97,448 

14,050 



1 

111,499 



2,040 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT 


1,026 


36. Salaries 


3.066 


37. Expenses 
38 Out of State 




39. Outlay 


5,050 


TOTAL HEALTH DEPT. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

40. Salaries 498,614 

41. Expenses 424,494 

42. Snow and Ice 270,000 

TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPT. 1,193,108 
APPROPRIATION FROM REVENUE SHARING 

FOR STREET RESURFACING 100,000 

NET COST HIGHWAY DEPT. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

43. Expenses 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

44. Center 

45. North 

46. East 

47. South 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

48. Superintendent's Salary 

49. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

50. Salaries 

51. Expenses 

52. Out of State 

53. Outlay 

TOTAL INSPECTION DEPT. 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

Property Liability & All Types 
Chapter 32B 

54. Total Insurance Department 

LAW DEPARTMENT 

55. Town Counsel 

56. Legal Services 

57. Misc. Expense — Assoc. Dues 

TOTAL LAW DEPT. 



1,093,108 



1,000 



52,050 

19,300 

7,000 



78,350 



1,200 
10,800 

12,050 



126,692 

15,502 

500 

1^ 

142,695 



400,660 
973,918 

1,374,578 



500 

40,000 

750 

41,250 



31 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 




58. Salaries 


330,702 


59. Expenses 


63,905 


60. Books & Periodicals 


84,040 


61. ^ Outlay 


4,200 


TOTAL LIBRARY DEPT 


482,847 


LESS STATE AID 


15,587 


NET COST LIBRARY DEPT. 


467,260 


MODERATOR 




62. Salary 


300 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

63. Assessment 536,337 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

64. Salaries 

65. Expenses 

66. Outlay 

TOTAL PARK DEPT. 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

67. Expenses 



33,553 

6,446 

1 



PLANNING BOARD 


68. 
69. 


Expenses 
Outlay 




TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 


70. 


Salaries 




71. 
72. 


Expenses 

Chiefs Out of State 


73. 
74. 
75. 


Outlay 
Auxiliary - 
Auxiliary - 


- Expense 
-Outlay 



40,000 



650 



16,250 
1 



16,251 



1,944,183 

199,148 

1,050 

1 

3,070 

400 



TOTAL POLICE DEPT. 


2,147,852 


APPROPRIATION FROM REVENUE SHARING 


FOR SALARIES 


300,000 


NET COST POLICE DEPT. 


1,847,852 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 




76. Salaries 


40,851 


77. Expenses 


58,930 


78. Supervision Fee 


6,000 


79. Outlay 


2,000 


TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPT. 


107,781 


RECREATION COMMISSION 




80. Salaries 


25,107 


81. Expenses 


16,780 


82. Outlay 






TOTAL RECREATION COMMISSION 

REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

83. Salaries 

84. Expense 

85. Outlay 

TOTAL REGISTRARS DEPT. 



41,887 



20,685 

7,991 

1 



28,677 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

86. Total School Department 
Minus Tuitions 
Minus Community Education 

Minus Reimbursement Funds 
Received from School Building 
Capital Improvements Reserved 
for Appropriation 



17,896,684 
5,000 
5,000 

17,886,684 



80,321 



NET COST SCHOOL DEPT. 


17,806,363 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 




87. Salary 


2,000 


88. Expenses 


300 


TOTAL SEALER DEPT. 


2,300 


SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 




89. Salaries 


86,404 


90. Expenses 


14,800 


91. Outlay 


1,500 


92. Out of State 


500 


TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPT. 


103,204 


SEWER COMMISSION 




93. Salaries 


27,500 


94. Expenses 


15,000 


95. Professional Fees 


10,000 


96. Outlay 


1 


97. Out of State 


3,500 



TOTAL SEWER COMMISSION 

STREET LIGHTING 

98. Expense 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

99. Expenses 

TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

100. Salaries 

101. Expenses 

102. Outlay 

TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPT. 

TOWN ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

103. Salaries 

104. Expenses 

105. Outlay 

106. Out of State 

TOTAL ENGINEERING DEPT. 



56,001 



160,000 



500 



86,555 

5,635 

600 

92,790 



51,702 

5,590 

1 

1 

57,294 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 

107. Salaries 143,417 

108 Expenses 25,725 

109. Outlay 1 

TOTAL TREASURER/COLLECTOR DEPT. 169,143 



TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 

110. Salaries 

111. Expenses 

112. Outlay 

TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPT. 



1,000 
13,875 

1 



14,876 



32 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND 




113. Labor — Part Time 


3,000 


114. Expenses 


1,999 


115. Outlay 


1 


TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 


5,000 


VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 




116. Salaries 


42,154 


117. Expenses 


4,150 


118. Outlay 


200 


119. Cash and Material Grants 


53,000 



TOTAL VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPT. 

WASTE COLLECTION 

120. Expense 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT 

121. Ambulance Service 

122. Cable TV Commission 

123. Clerk of Committees 

124. County Retirement Assessment 

125. Cultural Council 

126. Elder Serv. of Merrimack Valley 

127. Historic District Commission 

128. Lowell Mental Health 

129. Medical Bills Retired Police & 
Fire Chapter 41 Section 100B 

130. Memorial Day Expense 

131. Mobile Home Rent Control Board 

132. Mosquito Control 

133. NMAC Assessment 

134. Police Mutual Aid -LEA A 

135. Preliminary Project Studies 

136. Retirement Reserve Fund 

137. Town Clock Expense 

138. Town & Fin. Com. Reports 

139. Unemployment Benefits Due State 

140. Veterans Pension Claims 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPT. 

Total Article 3. (Gross) 

Less: Transfer from Available Funds 
Federal Revenue Sharing 700,000 

State Aid to Libraries 15,587 

Cemetery P/C Interest 15,000 

Reimbursement Funds Reserved 80,321 
for Appropriation-School Capital Bldg. 

Improvements 

Total Transfers 

TOTAL RAISE AND APPROPRIATE 



99,504 



992,652 



1 

3,100 

1 

937,070 

100 

1,800 

1,000 

8,695 

5,000 

1,000 

500 

10.000 

8,422 

2,000 

1 



600 

5,500 

90,000 

6,000 

1.080.790 
31,114.692 



810,908 
$30,303,784 



UNDER ARTICLE 4 James Doukszewicz, Tax Collec- 
tor/Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue 
of the financial year beginning July 1, 1985; in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4 and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17. 



The Finance Committee recommended the article, mo- 
tion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 James Doukszewicz, Tax Collec- 
tor/Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to request the 
Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all ac- 
counts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

Article 6 was voted at April 29th meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee, moved that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate sum of three hundred thousand dollars 
($300,000.00) to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discre- 
tion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

The Finance Committee supported the article, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Anthony Cali moved that the Town 
vote to petition the General Court in conformity with sec- 
tion 8, article 89 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to rescind the special legislation providing 
for a Mobile Home Park Rent Control By-law. 

The Finance Committee was against the article and ask 
the Town Meeting Body to defeat it. Bernard Ready, Chair- 
man of the Rent Control Board, urged the Body to vote 
against the article, and moved the question to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the article, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Dennis Ready, moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the site of the Dog Pound 
established by Article 1 of the May 16, 1983 Special Town 
Meeting, from the Police Station located on North Road, 
to property owned by the Town of Chelmsford located off 
North Road, at the McCarthy Junior High School. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee 
both supported the article. Selectman Emerson, member 
of the Dog Pound Committee spoke in favor. Linda Allen 
Chairman of the Committee asked the Town Meeting Body 
for their support. Donald Fraser of the 255 North Road 
Condominiums, which are located across the street from 
the proposed location, spoke against the location. After 
a lengthy discussion Donald Gray moved the question to 
stop debate, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
to amend the article. Line Item 6, Traffic & Safety Comm. 
Engnrg. Fire Sta. Traffic lights from $15,000 to $35,000. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the amendment. 
James Doukszewicz a member of the Capital Planning 
Committee spoke about the article. A lengthy discussion 



33 



took place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend. Motion carried. 

Carl Olsson, Chairman of the School Committee moved 
that Line item 11 School Building Capital Improvements 
reflect a total bottom line figure, not individual figures for 
the improvements of sublines A through G. 

The Finance Committee was not in favor of the motion. 
The Committee did not want to give just a bottom line for 
the School Committee to work with. They felt that the con- 
trol should be there. Carl Olsson explained that when the 
School Committee goes out for bids on these projects and 
if the figures come in higher than the money listed on a 
certain line item and lower on the next, the extra money 
cannot be put toward the higher required figure to com- 
plete the project. As a result the committee is locked into 
these figures, and if the bids reflect higher amounts than 
allocated, then priorities will have to be set up on what 
projects will be done. A lengthy discussion followed. Select- 
man Ready asked for Town Counsel's opinion on the mo- 
tion. James Harrington, Town Counsel explained that the 
total figure for the School Department would be able to 
be expended only on the capital expenditures as listed 
under line item 11 A,B,C,D,E,F,G., but the line items which 
reads beside each particular capital expenditure could be 
changed by the School Department. After more lengthy 
discussion, in which numerous amount of voters spoke 
against and in favor of the motion, the Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion defeated. 

George Ripsom moved that the School Building Capital 
Improvement Line A Roof ext. over art room & terrace 
be amended from $90,000 to $0. and that line G. High 
Schl. repair/replace intercom system telephone system be 
amended from $100,000. to $0. After lengthy discussion 
took place the Finance Committee moved to withdraw their 
motion to amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to withdraw, motion carried, unanimously. 
Frederick Reid moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked if there was a need for further debate, 
hearing none he asked for a voice vote on the main mo- 
tion as amended. Motion carried, unanimously. The arti- 
cle reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of four hundred sixty-four 
thousand eight hundred thirty-two dollars ($464,832.00) 
to transfer and appropriate from the Stabilization Fund 
the sum of two hundred eighty-five thousand six hundred 
and nine dollars ($285,609.00) and to borrow the sum of 
one million eighty thousand three hundred dollars ($1,080,- 
300.00) for the following capital improvements throughout 
the Town and Capital Improvements for the School 
Department: 





ITEM 


COST 


FUNDING SOURCE 


1. 


Landfill Closure 


$150,000. 


Raise & Appropriate 


2. 


Fire- Ladder Truck 


210.000. 


Stabilization Fund Tfr. 


3. 

4. 


Pol ice -Cruisers (5) 
Fire- Service 


60,000. 


Stabilization Fund Tfr. 




Truck, 4 w.d. Pup 


15,609. 


Stabilization Fund Tfr. 



Police-Roof total 






cost equals §30,000. 






(total cost $15,000. in 






present budgets) 


15,000. 


Raise & Appropriate 


Traffic & Safety- 






Comm.-Engnrg. Fire 






Station Traffic 






Lights 


35,000. 


Raise & Appropriate 


Highway-Bituminous 


100,000. 


Raise & Appropriate 


Police-Mobile 






Radios 


6,000 


Raise & Appropriate 


Library-Architect 






Fees (Hdcp-. Regs.) 


5,000. 


Raise & Appropriate 


Highway-Diesel 






Dump Truck (2) 






Loader (1) 


153,832. 


Raise & Appropriate 


School BIdg. Capital 






Improvements: 






A. High Schl. Roof- 






Completion 


389,500. 




Roof ext. over art 






room & terrace 


90,000. 




B. McCarthy-Complete 






roof rehab. & 


74,800. 




Re-coat roofs 


13,000. 




C. So. Row- Roof 






rehab. 


232.000. 




D. Westlands, 






Harrington, Parker. 






Byam -asbestos 






removal and 






reinsulation 


139,000. 




E. Harrington-repair 






cracked walls & 






tile bases 


7,000. 




F. McCarthy-Auditorium 






wiring & control 






board repairs 


35,000. 




G. High Schl. -repair/ 






replace intercom. 






system- telephone 






system 


100,000. 


Borrow- 2 yrs notes 



Schl. (sub-tot) 51,080,300. 

CAPITAL EXPENSE TOTAL 
OVERALL $1,830,741 



Selectman Dennis Ready, moved that the Town Meeting 
adjourn until Monday, May 13th, 7:30 PM at the McCar- 
thy Jr. High School Gym. Motion carried. The meeting ad- 
journed at 11:30 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 13th, 1985 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:40 PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, at 
the McCarthy Junior High School Gym. There were 195 
voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of one 
dollar ($1.00) for the purpose of implementing a Traffic 
Control Division within the Police Department. 

Selectman Ready spoke about the article. The Finance 
Committee does not recommend the article. Voice vote 
taken, motion defeated. 



34 



UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of five 
thousand dollars ($5,000.00) to publish an additional Town 
History covering the years 1915 through 1975, 

The Finance Committee does not recommend the arti- 
cle. Voice vote taken, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws Ar- 
ticle VII miscellaneous by deleting Section 3 Auctions — 
Sales in its entirety and substitute the following: 

Section 3 Auctions — Sales 

All auctions and sales in public buildings in the Town 
of Chelmsford are hereby prohibited except for the pur- 
pose of town business or such other business as may be 
deemed proper or necessary by the Committee, Board, or 
Officer having charge of said public building; 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article 
VI Police Regulations Section 16 by deleting Section 16. 
Solicitors in its entirety and substituting the following: 

Section 16. Solicitors 

No person, corporation or other organization shall solicit 
orders or subscriptions for goods or services, or sell goods 
or services door to door, in the Town without first having 
registered with the Police Department. There shall be no 
door to door solicitation or selling before 9:00 o'clock in 
the forenoon or after 6:00 in the evening. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
to withdraw this article. 

The Finance Committee recommends the withdrawal, 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16, 17,18, &19 The same action and 
vote took place on each of these articles. The Selectmen 
ask for permission to sell to interested parties certain pieces 
of land. Once the interested party explains why he/she want 
to purchase the land in question, then the Finance Com- 
mittee recommends on the motion. On these particular ar- 
ticles the interested parties were not present, therefore the 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee did not 
recommend any of the articles. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on each, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all right, title, and interest, if any held by the Town, in 
a certain parcel of land on Wightman Street, shown as Lot 
14, Blk 10 Assessors' Plat 19 and being the premises taken 



by the Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, 
dated May 3, 1979 and recorded in Middlesex North Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds in Book 2364, Page 152, contain- 
ing approximately 5,000 square feet, more or less, of land. 
Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land located at 283 Riverneck Road and 
being the premises taken by the Town of Chelmsford by 
an instrument of taking, dated July 29, 1977 and recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
2260, Page 274, containing approximately 24,675 s.f. of 
land more or less. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all right, title, and interest, if any, held by the Town in 
a certain parcel of land located on Billerica Road, shown 
as lots 39A and 42B, Blk 36 on Assessors' Plat 129 and more 
particularly described in a certificate of title recorded in 
the land court, Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
certificate of Title number 6668, Book 36, page 141. Mo- 
tion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all right and title, and interest, if any, held by the Town 
in a certain parcel of land located at 9 Alcorn Road, and 
being the premises taken by the Town of Chelmsford by 
an instrument of taking dated May 3, 1979 and recorded 
in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 2364, 
Page 135, containing approximately 1.3 acres of land more 
or less. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey all right, ti- 
tle and interest, if any, in a certain parcel of land located 
at 7 Fourth Avenue, and being the premises taken by the 
Town of Chelmsford by an instrument of taking, dated 
December 27, 1973 and recorded in Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2096, Page 686, and 
shown on Assessors Map 66 as lot 68, containing approx- 
imately 3,240 square feet of land more or less. 

Louise Daigle, the petitioner came forward and ex- 
plained why she wanted the land in question. The Board 
of Selectmen and the Finance Committee supported the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire in fee simple by purchase, eminent domain, or 
otherwise the property located on Fletcher Street, in the 
Town of Chelmsford, and further described as Parcel A and 
Parcel B as follows: 



35 



PARCEL A 

A certain parcel of land located on the southerly side 
of Fletcher Street on the westerly side of Chelmsford 
Street, Town of Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass- 
achusetts, and shown as Parcel A on a certain plan 
entitled "Highway Taking Plan of Land in Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts", Scale 1 " = 10 ', March 19, 1985 
by SEA Consultants, Inc. bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the westerly corner of the lot at the in- 
tersection of lot line and Fletcher Street running 
along the lot line south 14 -54 ' -00 " west seven (7 ') 
feet; 

Thence north 75 -06 ' -00 " east approximately one 
hundred eight (108 ') feet; 

Thence southerly along a curve of thirteen (13 ') foot 
radius approximately twenty-eight (28 ') feet to the 
intersection of Chelmsford Street; 

Thence north 46 -44 ' -00 " east along Chelmsford 
Street approximately nine (9') feet; 

Thence north 28 -07 ' -11 " west twenty-four and 
27/100 (24.27 ') feet to the intersection with Fletcher 
Street; 

Thence south 75 -06 ' -00 " west along Fletcher Street 
approximately one hundred eight (108 ') feet to the 
point of beginning, containing approximately 800 
square feet. 

PARCEL B 



Said parcel being further shown as Parcel A and 
Parcel B on a certain plan filed with the Town 
Engineer entitled, "Highway Taking Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts", prepared for the Town 
of Chelmsford, Scale 1" =10 ', March 19, 1985 by SEA 
Consultants, Inc., Consulting Engineers, 54 Canal 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts for the purpose of con- 
structing improvements and widening Fletcher Street 
as part of the Chelmsford Street/Fletcher Street in- 
tersection improvements; and I move that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of ten thou- 
sand dollars ($10,000.00) to defray all necessary costs, 
fees and expenses in connection with the acquisition 
of said land and for paying any damages which may 
be awarded as a result of any such taking. 



UNDER ARTICLE 22 The Moderator explained that 
the Town Clerk had an unsigned motion for this article, 
and unless the motion was signed, then no action could 
be taken. The Moderator asked if the petitioner would 
come forward and sign the motion. No one came forward, 
no action was taken. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Attorney James Geary moved to 
withdraw the article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned streets 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their 
reports and plans duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of ten thousand five hundred dollars ($10,500.00) 
for the purpose of reconstructing the following mentioned 
streets: 



A certain parcel of land located on the southerly side 
of Fletcher Street on the westerly side of Chelmsford 
Street, Town of Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass- 
achusetts, and shown as Parcel B on a certain plan 
entitled "Highway Taking Plan of Land in Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts", Scale 1 " = 10 ', March 19, 1985 
by SEA Consultants, Inc. bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the northerly corner of the lot at the 
intersection of the lot line and Fletcher Street and 
running along the lot line south 14 -54 ' -00" west 
seven (7 ') feet; 

Thence south 75 -06 9 -00 " west approximately fifty- 
seven (57 ') feet; 

Thence north 43 -51 ' -00 " west approximately thir- 
teen and 5/10 (13.5 ') feet to the intersection with 
Fletcher Street; 

Thence north 75 -06 ' -00 " east along Fletcher Street 
approximately fifty-seven (57 ') feet to the point of 
beginning, containing approximately 440 square feet; 



(1) Sturbridge Drive 

(2) Matthew Lane 

(3) Penni Lane 



0.00 

0.00 

10,500.00 



Providing all the construction of the same meets with 
the requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject 
to the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met. 

The Finance Committee was against Penni Lane being 
approved, but was in favor of the other two streets. The 
Committee moved to amend the article to accept Matthew 
Lane and Sturbridge Drive and to delete Penni Lane. After 
much discussion, Dennis Hunt of Penni Lane, spoke against 
the motion, the Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
to amend defeated. He then asked for a voice vote on the 
article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept Monmoth Street as laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports and 
plans duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and I move 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
seventy five thousand dollars ($75,000.00) for the purpose 
of reconstructing Monmoth Street, providing all the con- 



36 



struction of the same meets with the requirements of the 
Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any 
remaining bonds until such requirements have been met. 

The Selectmen were in favor of the article, and asked 
the Town Meeting Body for approval. The Finance Com- 
mittee is against the article. David Campbell spoke in favor, 
explaining that it is a dirt road and has been for many 
many years and felt that it was about time that the street 
was hot topped and accepted. More residents of the street 
spoke in favor of the article. David Garrigan moved to 
amend the article by changing the requested amount to 
540,000.00., more or less. Town Counsel's opinion was ask- 
ed by the Moderator due to the wording of the motion. 
The motion was ruled out of order, because of the "more 
or less" wording. 

More discussion took place, David Campbell moved the 
question to stop debate. Asking if there was any need for 
further debate, the moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the main motion, which left the chair in doubt, he then 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept Locust Street as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports and 
plans duly filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and I move 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the sum of 
Seventy-Five Thousand Dollars (S75.000.00) for the pur- 
pose of reconstruction Locust Street, providing all the con- 
struction of the same meets with the requirements of the 
Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of any 
remaining bonds until such requirements have been met. 

Town Counsel James Harrington moved that the motion 
be changed to reflect the name of Locust Road instead of 
Locust Street. Motion carried, by voice vote. Much discus- 
sion took place, voters spoke in favor and against the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept Wiggins Street as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports and 
plans duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and I move 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the sum of 
ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) for the purpose of re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met. 

Selectman Blomgren moved to amend the article to read 
$50,000.00 and asked for support on the motion. The 
Finance Committee was against the motion and the arti- 
cle. At the present time the Town is involved with a court 
case on the construction of the road, and the Finance Com- 
mittee feels that the article should be defeated. After discus- 
sion the Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to amend, motion defeated. He then asked for a voice vote 
on the main motion, motion defeatd. 



UNDER ARTICLE 28 Town Counsel James Harrington, 
moved to amend section F as recommended and voted 
unanimously, by the Planning Board, with the following 
wording: Adequate access to each structure for fire 
emergency and service equipment is provided. This shall 
mean that access shall be provided to all sides of the struc- 
ture for emergency vehicles and fire lanes, as recommended 
by the Fire Department. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

Chairman of the Planning Board. John McCarthy read 
the Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held 
a public hearing on April 3, 1985, and voted unanimously 
to approve this article. Which includes the amendment to 
line F. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried 
unanimously. 

The article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Planning Board John McCarthy, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws Article 
I Administration and Procedure Section 1400 Planning 
Board by deleting Subsection 1425 in its entirety and 
substituting the following: 

1425 —A special permit may be granted by the Plan- 
ning Board upon its determination that the follow- 
ing minimum standards have been met or exceeds: 

a. The requirements of Section 1520 — Special Per- 
mit Criteria. 

b. The applicable requirements of Section 
4500 — Major Business Complexes. 

c. Ingress/egress is in accordance with Section 
3144 — (Parking) and internal circulation is 
designed to control access to points of ingress/ 
egress using smooth flow of traffic. 

d. Access from minor streets serving residential 
neighborhoods shall not be used unless the ap- 
plicant can clearly demonstrate a need for use 
of such road(s) 

e. Parking areas shall be screened to minimize 
floodlight and headlight glare and to confine 
vehicles to the parking area and to restrict them 
from using adjacent properties. As a minimum, 
parking shall be designed in accordance with 
Section 3100 — Off-Street Parking and Loading 
and Section 3423 — (Screening). 

f. Adequate access to each structure for fire 
emergency is provided. This shall mean that ac- 
cess shall be provided to all sides of the struc- 
ture for emergency vehicles and fire lanes as 
recommended by the Fire Department. 



37 



g. Statements on the adequacy and availability of 
water and sanitary facilities for the proposed de- 
velopment, from the appropriate agency shall be 
submitted by the applicant. 

h. Storm drainage proposals conform to the re- 
quirements of the Chelmsford Subdivision 
Regulations. 

i. Major topographic changes or removal of ex- 
isting trees or other important natural elements 
of the site will be minimized. All grading shall 
conform to Section 3410 — Grading. 

j. Effective use is made of the topography, land- 
scaping, building placement and building design 
to maintain to the degree feasible, the character 
of the neighborhood. A reasonable degree of 
compatibility between the proposed development 
and adjacent areas must be maintained. This 
will be done through the use of natural buffer- 
strips and screening; and through the location 
of like uses or like intensity along the boundary 
where other uses, particularly residential uses, 
exist or are permitted. 

k. Along with the site plan, the applicant shall sub- 
mit a certification by a registered professional 
engineer that the proposal conforms to Section 
3200 — Environmental Protection Standards. In 
addition, the applicant shall submit an affidavit 
acknowledging his understanding of this stan- 
dard and his or his successors continuing agree- 
ment to comply with it. 

1. The amount of parking is in conformance with 
Section 3100 — Off-Street Parking and Loading 
and where fifty (50) or more cars are to be 
located in a parking lot, raised planting strips, 
trees and landscape features shall be used to con- 
trol traffic patterns across the paved areas. 

m. Pedestrian circulation is provided for within the 
development and there is a rational linkage of 
the system within the development to existing or 
potential circulation outside. 

n. That all other requirements of this By-law ap- 
plicable to the site plan have been satisfied. 

To the extent permitted by law, the effective date of this 
amendment shall be the date of approval of the amend- 
ment to the by-laws by the Office of the Attorney General 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as required by 
Chapter 40 Section 32. 



Halvar Peterson moved to take article 40 out of order. 
Motion carried, by voice vote. 



UNDER ARTICLE 40 Housing Authority Chairman, 
Ruth Delaney moved to amend the article. The Housing 
Authority wanted the Selectmen to convey to them the pro- 
perty for $1.00, with two conditions. First that the proper- 
ty is used for the exclusive and specific purpose of elderly 
housing, Second, that the CHA shall not convey, lease or 
otherwise alienate any interest in the property. If either of 
these conditions occurs, then the title to the property shall 
automatically revert to the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committe was in favor of the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority's motion however, they wanted to amend 
the amendment by locking the Authority into development 
of the property within five years, if not developed, then 
it shall revert to Town ownership and its use shall be redeter- 
mined at the next annual Town Meeting. 

A discussion followed. A number of voters spoke against 
the Finance Committee's motion but were in favor of the 
Housing Authority's motion. The voter's felt that the Hous- 
ing Authority's motion was specific enough. Why force the 
Authority to have to receive funding by a certain time. It 
was better to allow the Authority the time needed, rather 
than allow a private developer to take over the land, and 
put whatever they wanted on it. 

Selectman Emerson asked if the Housing Authority could 
guarantee strictly elderly housing on the site, and how long 
of a wait for the funding? Mrs. Delaney guaranteed that 
only elderly housing would go on the site, however, fund- 
ing was a problem. Due to the Board of Selectmen's lack 
of co-operation in the past, when this site had become avail- 
able. She read letters from the Selectmen to the CHA which 
did indicate that the North School site would be made 
available to the CHA when the time came. Also read to 
the Town Meeting Body was a letter dated this year from 
the Executive Office of Community Development in- 
dicating that Chelmsford stood a good chance of not receiv- 
ing any future funding for any type of state grants due to 
lack of family housing being made available in Town. The 
CHA had asked the Selectmen for the Grange Hall in S. 
Chelmsford, for a family housing site, (monies were 
available but a site was needed) and the Board of Select- 
men after a public hearing with the residents decided to 
award the site to a contractor. More discussion followed. 
Selectman Ready explained why the Selectmen did not 
award the Grange Hall to the CHA. Mrs. Delaney moved 
the question to stop debate, the Moderator asked if there 
was any need for further discussion, hearing none, he asked 
for a voice vote on the Finance Committee's motion to 
amend. Motion defeated. Joseph Shanahan representing 
Robert McBride a non resident, who is interested in ob- 
taining the North School site for private elderly housing 
development, asked to address the Town Meeting Body in 
Mr. McBride's behalf. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, 
motion defeated. Joseph Shanahan then spoke for himself 
on the Housing Authority's motion to amend. More discus- 
sion followed. William Keohane, member of the Housing 
Authority, spoke on the article. Halvar Peterson moved the 
question to stop debate, the Moderator asked for any need 
for further debate, hearing none, asked for a voice vote 
on the Housing Authority's motion to amend, motion car- 



38 



ried. Selectman Ready moved that the motion be amend- 
ed to include the words "low income" elderly housing only, 
in the first condition sentence. The Finance Committee 
recommends the motion to amend. Mrs. Delaney stated 
that is the only type of elderly housing that the Authority 
could build. Voice vote taken on the motion to amend, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. Edward Marshall moved the 
question to stop debate, hearing no discussion, the 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main motion as 
amended twice, motion carried, unanimously. Article 40 
reads as follows: 



Section 20. Prohibition on Unauthorized Parking 
in Designated Handicapped Spaces in Private or 
Public Ways. 

1. It shall be unlawful to park a motor vehicle in 
a parking space reserved and designated for use 
by vehicles of handicapped persons, whether 
located on public or private ways or properties, 
unless authorized to do so by the terms of this 
by-law or the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 



Chairman of the Housing Authority, Ruth K. Delaney, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men for consideration of One (SI. 00) dollar to convey to 
the Chelmsford Housing Authority, all right, title, and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a parcel of land known 
as the North School and containing approximately 16.5 
acres of land, more or less, and being a portion of proper- 
ty taken by the Town of Chelmsford by order of taking 
dated January 17, 1951, recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 1161, Page 258, subject 
to the following terms, conditions and restrictions: First that 
the above property is used for the exlusive and specific pur- 
pose of low income elderly housing, Second, that the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority shall not convey, lease, or 
otherwise alienate any interest in the above property. If 
either of these conditions occurs, then the title to the pro- 
perty shall automatically revert to the Town of Chelmsford. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Chairman of the Planning Board 
John McCarthy moved to withdraw the article. 

The Finance Committee recommends the motion. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 Chairman of the Planning Board 
John McCarthy moved to withdraw the article. 

The Finance Committee recommends the motion. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Chairman of the Planning Board 
John McCarthy moved to withdraw the article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32 Deputy Chief Fitts, of the Police 
Department spoke about the article, and explained that 
this by-law presently exists in Chelmsford. However, since 
it was passed and approved last year at the Annual Town 
Meeting changes had to be made in order to be able to 
enforce the by-law better. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion, motion carried unanimously. The ar- 
ticle reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations 
by deleting Section 20 Prohibition on Unauthorized 
Parking in Designated Handicapped Parking Spaces in 
Private or Public Ways in its entirety and substitute the 
following: 



2. A fine of $15.00 shall be imposed for the un- 
authorized parking of a motor vehicle in a space 
reserved and designated for use by vehicles of 
handicapped persons, pursuant to the authority 
of Chapter 90, Section 20C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws. 

3. The Police Department and all members thereof 
assigned to traffic duty, are hereby authorized 
to remove and tow away, or have removed and 
towed away by commercial towing services, at the 
sole expense of the owner of said motor vehicle, 
any motor vehicle left unattended or parked in 
a parking space reserved and designated for use 
by a vehicle of a handicapped person, unless said 
vehicle shall be designated as a vehicle of a 
handicapped person. Motor vehicles so towed 
away shall be stored in a safe place and restored 
to the owner or operator thereof upon payment 
by the owner or operator of the expenses incur- 
red in said removal and storage. 

4. (a) The person or body that has lawful control 
of a public or private way or of improved or en- 
closed property used as off-street parking areas 
for businesses, shopping malls, theaters, audito- 
riums, sporting or recreational facilities, cultural 
centers, residential dwellings, or for any other 
place where the public has a right of access as 
invitees or licensees shall reserve parking spaces 
in said off-street parking areas for any vehicle 
owned and operated by a handicapped person 
whose vehicle bears the distinguishing license 
plate authorized by section two of chapter nine- 
ty, according to the following formula: 

If the number of parking spaces in any such area 
is more than fifteen but not more than twenty- 
five, one parking space; more than twenty-five 
but not more than forty, five percent of such 
spaces but not less than two; more than forty but 
not more than one hundred, four percent of such 
spaces but not less than three; more than one 
hundred but not more than two hundred, three 
percent of such spaces but not less than four, 
more than two hundred but not more than five 
hundred, two percent of such spaces but not less 
than six; more than five hundred but not more 
than one thousand, one and one-half percent of 
such spaces but not less than ten; more than one 



39 



thousand but not more than two thousand, one 
percent of such spaces but not less than fifteen; 
more than two thousand but less than five thou- 
sand, three-fourths of one percent of such spaces 
but not less than twenty; and more than five 
thousand, one-half of one percent of such spaces 
but not less than thirty. 

(b) Parking spaces designated as reserved under 
the provisions of paragraph (a) shall be identified 
by the use of above grade signs with white let- 
tering against a blue background and shall bear 
the words "Handicapped Parking; Special Plate 
Required. Unauthorized Vehicles May be 
Removed at Owner's Expense"; shall be as near 
as possible to a building entrance or walkway; 
shall be adjacent to curb ramps or other 
unobstructed methods permitting sidewalk ac- 
cess to a handicapped person; and shall be twelve 
feet wide or two eight-foot wide areas with four 
feet of cross hatch between them. 

5. Violation of this By-Law shall be punishable as 
provided in General By-Law, Article I. 

6. In the absence of the operator of any motor vehi- 
cle violating any provisions of the By-Law, it shall 
be deemed that the registered owner of such vehi- 
cle was the operator. 

7. Any motor vehicle bearing a handicapped park- 
ing permit or motor vehicle registration plate 
designating the vehicle as one used by a handi- 
capped person shall be authorized to park in a 
designated handicapped parking space. The 
Chief of Police, his designee, or the Town Clerk 
may issue a temporary handicapped Parking Per- 
mit to any person upon application with suppor- 
ting medical affidavit signed by a licensed 
physician designating the applicant as physically 
handicapped. Said temporary permit shall be 
issued with an expiration date not to exceed sixty 
(60) days from the date of issue and shall be dis- 
played in front right windshield of any vehicle 
parked in a designated handicapped parking 
space. 

8. The unauthorized use of a temporary permit 
shall be punishable by a fine of $50.00. 

9. Each day that any violation continues shall con- 
stitue a separate offense. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33 Town Counsel James Harrington 
explained the history behind articles 33, 34, 35 & 36. Since 
1978 the Attorney General has a case pending with the 
Town of Chelmsford for the town to close the landfill on 
Swain Road. Articles 33 & 34 changes the zoning from CX 
to RM & RC. Articles 35 & 36 is a land swap, in order to 
obtain a clear title on the landfill. 



Chairman of the Planning Board John McCarthy read 
the Boards recommendation: The Planning Board held 
a Public Hearing on April 24, 1985 and unanimously voted 
to recommend the article in its present form. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Planning Board, John McCarthy moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and ac- 
companying Zoning Map referred to therein to change from 
Adult Entertainment District (CX) to Multiple Residence 
District (RM) the following described parcels. 



PARCEL ONE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 35 ± west of the culvert 
in Scotty Hollow Brook; 

Northerly through land of the Town of Chelmsford 
390 ± feet; 

Southwesterly by land of the H.E. Fletcher Com- 
pany, 210 ± feet; 

Southerly by land of Hicks, 305 ± feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Hicks, 175±feet; 

Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
1. 33 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 660 ± feet southwest of 
the southwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 

Southeasterly by land of G. Abrahamson, 200 ± 
feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Smith, 30 ± feet; 

Northwesterly by land of Sugden, 45 ± feet; 

Northerly by land of Sugden, 80 ± feet; 



40 



Northeasterly by land of Sugden, 110±feet; 

Westerly through land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
175 ± feet; 



terest, if any, held by the Town in three (3) parcels being 
a portion of land at the property now or formerly known 
as the Swain Road Landfill and more particularly described 
as follows: 



Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
0. 33 ± acres of land. 

Said Plan being filed with the Town Engineer and 
Planning Board. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34 Chairman of the Planning Board 
John McCarthy read the Board's recommendation: The 
Planning Board held a Public Hearing on April 24, 1985 
and unanimously voted to recommend this article in its pre- 
sent form. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Article reads as follows: 

Chairman of the Planning Board John McCarthy moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and ac- 
companying Zoning Map referred to therein to change from 
Adult Entertainment District (CX) to General Residence 
District (RC) the following parcel: 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inct. = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows: 

Starting at a point located 160 ± feet north of the 
northwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building: 

Northwesterly by land of the Lowell Sportsmen's 
Club, 725 ± feet; 

Southwesterly by land of the HE. Fletcher Com- 
pany, 445 ± feet; 

Southeasterly through land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, 510 ± feet; 

Northeasterly through land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, 305 ± feet; 

Containing according to said plan, approximate- 
ly 4. 94 ± acres of land. 

Said plan being filed with the Town Engineer. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35 The Finance Committee recom- 
mends the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion, motion carried, unanimously. Reads as 
follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be 
determined to convey and transfer all right, title and in- 



PARCEL ONE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 160 ± feet north of the 
northwest corner of the Town Salt Shed Building; 

Northwesterly by land of the Lowell Sportsmen's 
Club, 725 ± feet; 

Southwesterly by land of the H.E. Fletcher Com- 
pany, 445 ± feet; 

Southeasterly through land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, 510 ± feet; 

Northeasterly through land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, 305 ± feet; 

Containing according to said plan, approximate- 
ly 4.94 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford. Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.". scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 35 ± feet west of the 
culvert in Scotty Hollow Brook; 

Northerly through land of the Town of Chelmsford 
390 ± feet; 

Southwesterly by land of the H.E. Fletcher Com- 
pany, 210 ± feet; 

Southerly by land of Hicks, 305 ± feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Hicks, 175 ± feet; 

Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
1. 33 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL THREE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 



41 



Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows; 

Starting at a point located 660 + feet southwest of 
the southwest comer of the Town Salt Shed Building; 

Southeasterly by land of G. Abrahamson, 200 ± 
feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Smith, 30 + feet; 

Northwesterly by land of Sugden, 45 ± feet; 

Northerly by land of Sugden, 80 ± feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Sugden, 110 + feet; 

Westerly through land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
175 ± feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
0. 33 ± acres of land. 

Said plan being filed with the Town Engineer and 
Planning Board. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36 The Finance Committee supports 
the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion, motion carried, unanimously. Reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, 
by purchase, the following two parcels located at the pro- 
perty now or formerly known as the Swain Road Landfill 
and more particularly described as follows: 

PARCEL ONE 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated approximately 1,800 feet in a 
westerly direction from Swain Road, being shown on 
a plan entitled "Compiled Sketch Plan of Land for 
the Town of Chelmsford, Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 
feet, dated March 16, 1985, being described as 
follows; 

Starting at a point located 70 ± feet east of the 
culvert in Scotty Hollow Brook; 

Southeasterly through land of Hicks, 110±feet; 

Northeasterly through land of Hicks and Leed- 
burg, 390 ± feet; 

Northeasterly through land of E. Abrahamson & 
G. Abrahamson, 200 + feet; 

Northwesterly by land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
70 ± feet; 



Southwesterly by land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
by three courses, 320 + feet, 170 + feet and 80 + feet; 

Westerly by land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
55 + feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
1. 30 ± acres of land. 

PARCEL TWO 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, situated in a westerly direction from Swain 
Road, being shown on a plan entitled "Compiled 
Sketch Plan of Land for the Town of Chelmsford, 
Mass.", scale 1 inch = 100 feet, dated March 16, 1985, 
being described as follows: 

Starting at a utility pole along the west side of 
Swain Road located 100 ± feet north of the Town 
Landfill Old Access Road; 

Westerly through land of the Lowell Sportsmens 
Club, 620 + feet; 

Northerly through land of the Lowell Sportsmens 
Club, 245 ± feet; 

Westerly through land of the Lowell Sportsmens 
Club, 275 + feet; 

Southeasterly by land of the Town of Chelmsford, 
505 ± feet; 

Easterly by land of Sugden, 105±feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Sugden, 230 ± feet; 

Southeasterly by land of Sugden, 330 + feet; 

Southeasterly by land of Sugden, 115 ± feet; 

Northerly by Swain Road by three courses, 
140 ± feet, 65 + feet, 100 ± feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, approximately 
4.55 ± acres of land. 

Said plan being on file with the Town Engineer and 
Planning Board. 

The consideration for said purchase shall be deter- 
mined by the board of Selectmen in the form of 
transfers of other properties set forth in Article 35. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37 Selectman Ready moved to with- 
draw the article. The Finance Committee supports the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 



42 



UNDER ARTICLE 38 A Discussion took place. The 
Finance Committee moved to amend the motion by ad- 
ding to the end of the article "The Board of Selectmen shall 
not expand any funds until a firm commitment has been 
obtained from the resource recovery plant private sector 
proposed to reimburse the Town for all expenditures made 
under this article. After a lengthy discussion the Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion as amended, motion 
carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Ready moved that the town vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to engage engineers, appraisers, 
attorneys and other necessary consultants for the purpose 
of preparing all documentation required for the design, 
of a resource recovery facility and further to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary 
and proper contracts and agreements, and further I move 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, the sum of 
one hundred twenty five thousand dollars (S125.000.00) to 
defray all necessary costs, fees, and expenses. The Board 
of Selectmen shall not expend any funds until a firm com- 
mitment has been obtained from the resource recovery 
plant private sector proposed to reimburse the Town for 
all expenditures made under this article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39 Selectman Ready moved to with- 
draw the article. The Finance Committee supports the mo- 
tion. Motion carried by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board 
of Assessors in their discretion to issue an amount of money 
not to exceed SI. 100, 000. 00 from free cash in the Treasury 
for the reduction of the tax rate. The Board of Assessors 
shall be authorized to issue a lessor sum if deemed in the 
best interests of the Town. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator adjourned the Annual Town Meeting 
seeing that there was no further business at hand. Motion 
carried. The meeting adjourned at 10:35 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 24, 1985 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Auditorium on Monday evening, the twenty-fourth day of 
June 1985 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act upon the 
following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and General 
Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact 
special legislation creating the East Chelmsford Industrial 
Sewere District, to encompass a portion of the existing in- 
dustrial district in East Chelmsford: or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all con- 
tracts and agreements including agreements with the East 
Chelmsford Industrial Sewer District, and Private Industry, 
for the purpose of sewer services by and between the Town 
of Chelmsford and the East Chelmsford Industrial Sewer 
District, and authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute 
all necessary and proper warrants and agreements with the 
East Chelmsford Industrial Sewer District; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money to alleviate certain drainage problems on Weide 
Street: or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money to the appropriate 
salary line items to fund approved wage and salary increases 
in the following departmental accounts: 



Cemetery Department 
Highway Department 

any any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at Special Town Meeting; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 



43 



Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 6th day of June, A.D. 1985. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Roger A. Blomgren 

Paul C. Hart 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Middlesex, SS. 



June 6, 1985 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church Hall; 
McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior High School, 
Small Gymnasium; seven days at least before the time ap- 
pointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 24, 1985 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
PM, in the McCarthy Jr. High Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 340 voters present. 

Selectman Ready moved that the reading of the Con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted unanimously. Selectmen Ready 
moved that the reading of the entire warrant be waived. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 The Moderator read the first 
sentence of each section of the article. Selectman Ready 
spoke in favor of the article. John Emerson of the Sewer 
Commission spoke in favor. George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee spoke in favor of the article. Many questions 
were asked by the Town Meeting Body, concerning the En- 
vironmental Impact clause, what would happen if a com- 
pany left the area, who would be responsible for the 
payment of the system? Would the residential homes in the 



immediate area have to be included in the project? After 
a lengthy discussion in which these and other questions were 
answered, Eugene Crane moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator asked if there was any need for 
hearing any further debate, if none, then he would con- 
duct a vote on the article. Hearing none he asked for a 
voice vote on the article. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
article reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and 
General Court to enact special legislation creating the 
Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District. Such legisla- 
tion shall read as follows: 

SECTION 1. Those inhabitants of the Town of 
Chelmsford within the territory bounded and des- 
cribed as follows: Beginning: At a point on the border 
of the Town of Chelmsford and the Town of Billerica 
located at Route 3, and thence running: 

Northwesterly along Route 3 to 495; thence Wester- 
ly from 495 to River Meadow Brook; thence South- 
westerly over various courses along River Meadow 
Brook to Turnpike Road; thence 

Southeasterly along Turnpike Road to Mill Road; 
thence Easterly along Mill Road, approximately one 
thousand five hundred feet (1,500'); thence 

Southeasterly to the Billerica Town Line; thence Nor- 
theasterly along said Town line to the point of 
beginning. 

Said area is more particularly described on a plan 
entitled "Proposed Chelmsford Industrial Sewer 
District, Scale 1"=1,000' May, 1985, prepared by 
Weston and Sampson Eng., Inc., a copy of which is 
attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. 
Said described area shall constitute a sewer district 
and hereby made a body corporate entitled the 
Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District herein- 
after referred to as the District. 

SECTION 2. The purpose of the district shall be to 
lay out, construct, maintain, improve and operate 
a system or systems of sanitary sewers within or 
without the district which benefit a part of whole of 
the territory within the district, contracting with the 
Town of Chelmsford for such purposes, and for assess- 
ing and raising revenues as provided herein to pay 
for such services. 

SECTION 3. The powers conferred by this act shall 
be exercised by a board of sewer commissioners, con- 
sisting of seven (7) members. One member shall be 
a member of the Board of Selectmen, one member 
shall be a member of the Sewer Commission, and the 
remaining five (5) members shall be appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen for the Town of Chelmsford, said 
members being operators of businesses or landowners 
located within the district. In the event any member 



44 



should by a change of circumstances either by 
disposal of property, change of business interest, or 
removal from the Board of Selectmen or Sewer Com- 
mission as the case may be, fail to continue to meet 
the underlying criteria of his appointment, then said 
member shall notify the Board of Sewer Commis- 
sioners and his term shall terminate 30 days after the 
date of the occurrence of said change in cir- 
cumstances. The Board of Selectmen shall im- 
mediately upon notice appoint a new member to 
complete the unexpired term and said appointment 
to become effective on the 31st day after the occur- 
rence of the change. Said board shall not be subject 
to the supervision of the Sewer Commission of the 
town or of any other department, commission, board, 
bureau or agency of the town except to the extent 
and in the manner provided in this act. Members 
shall serve three-year terms, except the two (2) 
member of the initial board shall serve a one-year 
term, two (2) members shall serve two-year terms, and 
three (3) members shall serve three-year terms, the 
term of each initial board member to be designated 
by the Selectmen on appointment subject to the re- 
quirements of this Section. Any member of the board 
may be eligible for reappointment. Three members 
of the board shall constitute a quorum and the af- 
firmative vote of three members shall be necessary 
for any action taken by vote of the board; provided, 
however, that an affirmative vote of four members 
shall be necessary to exercise any of the powers 
enumerated in clause (i) of section four. No vacancy 
in the membership of the board shall impair the right 
of a quorum to exercise the powers of the board. Any 
action by the board shall take effect immediately 
unless otherwise provided and need not be publish- 
ed or posted. 

SECTION 4. The board acting for and on behalf of 
said district, shall have all the rights and powers 
necessary or convenient to carry out and effectuate 
this act, including, but without limiting the generali- 
ty of the foregoing, the following rights and powers: 

(a) to adopt by-laws for the regulation of its af- 
fairs and the conduct of its business, to promulgate 
rules, regulations and procedures in connection 
with the performance of its functions and duties, 
and to fix, enforce and collect penalties for the 
violation thereof; provided, however, that any by- 
laws with respect to the removal of members of 
the board shall be consistent with the by-laws of 
the Town of Chelmsford; 

(b) to adopt an official seal and alter the same at 
pleasure: 

(c) to maintain an office at such place or places 
as it may determine; 

(d) to apply for, receive, accept, administer, ex- 
pend and comply with the conditions, obligations 
and requirements respecting any grant, gift, loan, 
including without limitation any grant, gift or 



loan from agencies of local, state or federal govern- 
ments, donation or appropriation of any proper- 
ty or money in aid of the purposes of the district 
and to accept contributions of money, property, 
labor or other things of value; 

(e) to acquire by purchase, lease, lease-purchase, 
sale and lease-back, gift or devise, or to obtain op- 
tions for the acquisition of, any property, real or 
personal, tangible or intangible, or any interest 
therein, in the exercise of its powers and the per- 
formance of its duties: provided, however, that the 
board may not acquire property by eminent do- 
main, except as provided for in clause (g); 

(f) to sell, lease, mortgage, exchange, transfer or 
otherwise dispose of, or to grant options for any 
such purposes with respect to, any property, real 
or personal, tangible or intangible, or any interest 
therein; 

(g) to construct, improve, extend, enlarge, main- 
tain and repair the sewer works system for the 
benefit of the district; to construct such sewers 
under or over any bridge, railroad, railway, 
boulevard or other public way, or within the loca- 
tion of any railroad, and to enter upon and dig 
up any private land, public way or railroad loca- 
tion, for the purpose of laying such drains and 
sewers and of maintaining and repairing the same; 
provided, however, that they shall not enter upon 
or construct any drain or sewer within the loca- 
tion of any railroad corporation except at such 
time and in such manner as they may agree upon 
with such corporation, or, in case of failure to 
agree, as may be approved by the department of 
public utilities; and to make and maintain, in any 
way therein where main drains and common 
sewers are constructed, such connecting drains, 
sub-drains and sewers within the limits of such way 
as may be necessary to connect any estate which 
abuts upon such way. With respect to any work 
under this clause, the district shall be deemed to 
be a public agency for purposes of sections forty- 
four A to 44 A to 44H, inclusive, of Chapter 149 
of the General Laws and a commission of the Town 
of Chelmsford for purposes of Sections 38A 1/2 
to 38M, inclusive of Chapter 7 of the General Laws 
and a public agency of the town for purposes of 
Sections 39 A to 40M, inclusive, of said Chapter 
7. No work, project or activity of the district the 
total cost of which is less than three million dollars 
shall be subject to the provisions of said Sections 
61 to 62H, inclusive, of Chapter 30 of the General 
Laws; provided, however, that unless the district 
is otherwise exempted under this act, all ap- 
plicable provisions of the General Laws protecting 
public health, welfare and safety shall be ap- 
plicable; 



45 



(h) to pledge or assign any money, fees, charges, 
or other revenues of the district and any proceeds 
derived by the district; 

(i) to borrow money and incur indebtedness and 
issue bonds or notes as hereinafter provided; 

(j) to enter into contracts and agreements with the 
Town of Chelmsford in all matters necessary, con- 
venient or desirable for carrying out the purposes 
of this act including, without limiting the gener- 
ality of the foregoing, construction (including 
sewers outside the district but benefiting the 
district), improvements, collection of revenue, data 
processing, and other matters of management, ad- 
ministration and operation; to make other con- 
tracts of every name and nature; and to execute 
and deliver all instruments necessary or convenient 
for carrying out any of its purposes provided that 
all contracts made pursuant to clause (g) shall be 
approved by the selectmen of the town of Chelms- 
ford; 

(k) to exercise the powers and privileges of, and 
to be subject to the limitations upon, towns and 
cities provided by the provisions of Sections 38 to 
421, inclusive, of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
and Sections 1 to 24, inclusive, and 27 to 29, in- 
clusive, of Chapter 83 of the General Laws, insofar 
as such provisions may be applicable and are con- 
sistent with the provisions of this act; provided, 
however, that any requirement in said sections or 
chapters for a vote by the Board of Selectmen or 
other governing body of a town or for a vote by 
the voters of a town shall be satisfied by a vote or 
resolution duly adopted by the board in accor- 
dance herewith; and, provided further, that the 
powers of the board to make rules and regulations 
and establish penalties regarding the use of sewers 
shall not be limited by Section 10 of said Chapter 
83; 

(1) to sue and be sued and to prosecute and de- 
fend actions relating to its properties and affairs; 
provided, however, that property of the district 
other than revenues pledged to the payment of 
notes or bonds shall not be subject to attachment 
nor levied upon execution or otherwise; 

(m) to do all things necessary, convenient or desir- 
able for carrying out the purposes of this act or 
the powers expressly granted or necessarily implied 
in this act; and 

(n) consistent with the constitution and laws of the 
Commonwealth, the board shall have such other 
powers, including all powers pertaining to the 
sewer works system within its boundaries held by 
the Town of Chelmsford not inconsistent herewith, 
as may be necessary for the incident to carrying 
out the foregoing powers and the accomplishment 
of the purposes of this act. 



SECTION 5. The board is authorized and em- 
powered to fix, revise, charge, collect and abate 
reasonable fees, rates, rents and assessments, and 
other charges for sewer and other services, im- 
provements, facilities, and commodities furnished or 
supplied to real property in the district. In providing 
for the payment of the cost of said system or systems 
or the improvements thereof, or for the use of said 
system or systems, the board may avail itself of the 
provisions of the General Laws relative to the assess- 
ment, apportionment, division, reassessment, abate- 
ment and collection of sewer charges, including 
betterments, or the establishment of leins therefore 
and interest thereon. In order to provide for the col- 
lection and enforcement of its fees, rates, rents, 
assessments and other charges, the board is hereby 
granted all the powers and privileges with respect 
thereto held by the Town of Chelmsford on the ef- 
fective date of this act or as otherwise provided in 
this act, to be exercised concurrently with the town. 

The fees, rates, rents, assessments and other charges 
of the board of general application shall be adopted 
and revised by the board at least annually in accord- 
ance with procedures to be established by the board 
for assuring that interested persons are afforded 
notice and an opportunity to present data, views and 
arguments. The board shall hold at least one public 
hearing on its schedule of fees, rates and charges or 
any revision thereof prior to adoption, notice of which 
shall be delivered to the selectmen and be published 
in a newspaper of substantial circulation in the town 
at least one month in advance of the hearing. No 
later than the date of such publication, the board 
shall make available to the public and deliver to the 
selectmen the proposed schedule of fees, rates and 
charges. 

The fees, rates, rents, assessments, abatements and 
other charges established by the board shall not be 
subject to supervision or regulation by any depart- 
ment, division, commission, board, bureau, or agen- 
cy of the Commonwealth or any of its political 
subdivisions, including, without limitation, the town, 
nor shall the district be subject to the provisions of 
Section 20A of Chapter 59 of the General Laws. Not- 
withstanding the foregoing, except to the extent of 
betterments assessed by the board, the board shall 
have no power of taxation. The board's operating 
budget shall be limited to the sum of five thousand 
dollars for current administrative expenses approv- 
ed by the board in the year nineteen hundred and 
eighty-five. Each year thereafter said sum may be in- 
creased two and one-half per cent per year. 

The fees, rates, rents, assessments and other charges 
established by the board in accordance with this sec- 
tion shall be so fixed and adjusted in respect of the 
aggregate thereof so as to provide revenues at least 
sufficient (i) to pay the current expenses of the board. 
(ii) to pay the principal of, premium, if any, and in- 
terest on bonds or other evidences of indebtedness 



46 



issued by the board under this act as the same become 
due and payable, (iii) to create and maintain such 
reasonable reserves as may be reasonably required by 
any trust agreement or resolution securing bonds, (iv) 
to provide funds for paying the cost of all necessary 
repairs, replacements and renewals of the sewer works 
system and (v) to pay or provide for any amounts 
which the board may be obligated to pay or provide 
for by law or contract including any resolution or con- 
tract with or for the benefit of the holders of its bonds. 

SECTION 6. The board is hereby authorized and 
empowered to provide by resolution for the issuance, 
at one time or from time to time of notes of the 
district in the aggregate principal amount of two 
million dollars outstanding at any one time, ex- 
cluding notes refunded by other notes issued under 
this paragraph, for the purpose of providing funds 
for paying the cost of constructing or acquiring such 
improvements, extensions, enlargements, alterations, 
reconstruction or remodeling for the sewer works 
system as may be authorized by such resolution, in- 
cluding the funding of interest on any notes of the 
district has issued pursuant to section seven hereof 
in anticipation of federal, state or local grants for 
such work. 

Except as otherwise provided herein, notes issued by 
the district in accordance with this section shall be 
issued in anticipation of bonds to be issued by the 
district pursuant to section seven of this act and shall 
be authorized, issued and sold in the same manner 
as, and shall otherwise be subject to section eight and 
other provisions of this act relating to such bonds. 
Such notes shall mature at such time or times as pro- 
vided by resolution of the board and may be renew- 
ed from time to time; provided, however, that all such 
notes and renewals thereof shall mature on or prior 
to twenty years after their date of issuance. 

The proceeds of the notes authorized by this section 
shall be used solely for paying or providing for the 
cost of extensions, improvements or enlargements of 
the sewer works system including repayment of in- 
terest on notes of the district as provided in the sec- 
ond paragraph and shall be disbursed in such 
manner and under such restrictions as may be pro- 
vided in the regulation of the board. 

SECTION 7. In addition to the notes issued under 
the provisions of section six, the board may provide 
by resolution for the issuance from time to time of 
bonds of the district for any of its corporate purposes. 
Bonds may be issued hereunder as general obliga- 
tions of the district or as special obligations payable 
solely from particular funds. Without limiting the 
generality of the foregoing, such bonds may be issued 
to pay or refund notes issued by the Board pursuant 
to section six, to pay the cost of extension, enlarge- 
ment, or improvement of the sewer works system, to 
provide such reserves for debt service, repairs and 
replacements or other costs as may be required by 



a trust agreement or resolution securing bonds of the 
district, or for any combination of the foregoing pur- 
poses. The board may also provide by resolution for 
the issuance from time to time of temporary notes 
in anticipation of the revenues to be collected or 
received by the board in any year, or in anticipation 
of the receipt of federal, Commonwealth or local 
grants or other aid. The issuance of such notes shall 
be governed by the provisions of this act relating to 
the issuance of bonds other than such temporary 
notes as the same may be applicable; provided, how- 
ever, that notes issued in anticipation of revenues shall 
mature no later than one year from their respective 
dates and notes issued in anticipation of federal, 
Commonwealth or local grants or other aid and 
renewals thereof shall mature no later than the ex- 
pected date of receipt of such grants or aid. Notes 
in an anticipation of revenues issued to mature less 
than one year from their dates may be renewed by 
the board from time to time by the issue of other tem- 
porary notes hereunder; provided, however, that the 
period from the date of an original note to the 
maturity of any note issued to renew or pay the same 
or the interest thereon shall not exceed one year. 



SECTION 8. the principal of, premium, if any, and 
interest on all bonds or notes issued under the provi- 
sions of this act, unless otherwise provided herein, 
shall be payable solely from the funds provided there- 
for from revenues as herein provided. Bonds or notes 
of each issue shall be dated, shall bear interest at such 
rate or rates, including rates variable from time to 
time as determined by such index, bankers loan rate 
or other method determined by the board and shall 
mature at such time or times, as may be determined 
by the board, and may be made redeemable for 
maturity at the option of the board at such price or 
prices and under such terms and conditions as may 
be fixed by the board prior to the issue of bonds or 
notes. The board shall determine the form of bonds 
or notes, including interest coupons, if any, to be at- 
tached thereto, and the manner of execution of bonds 
or notes and shall fix the denomination or denomina- 
tions of bonds or notes and the place or places of pay- 
ment of principal and interest, which may be at any 
bank or trust company within or without the Com- 
monwealth. In case any officer whose signature or 
a facsimile of whose signature shall appear on any 
bonds or notes or coupons shall cease to be such of- 
ficer before the delivery thereof, such signature or 
such facsimile shall nevertheless be valid and suffi- 
cient for all purposes as if he had remained in office 
until after such delivery. The board may also pro- 
vide for authentication of bonds by a Trustee or fiscal 
agent. Bonds or notes may be issued in bearer, if not 
in conflict with federal law, or in registered form, or 
both and, if notes, may be made payable to bearer 
or to order, as the board may determine, and provi- 
sion may be made for the registration of any coupon 
bonds as to principal alone and also as to both prin- 



47 



cipal and interest, for the reconversion into coupon 
bonds or bonds registered as to both principal and 
interest and for the interchange of bonds registered 
as to both principal and interest and for the inter- 
change of registered and coupon bonds. The board 
may by resolution delegate to any member of the 
board or any combination of them the power to 
determine any of the matters set forth in this section 
including the power to award such bonds or notes 
to a purchaser or purchasers at public sale. The 
board may sell its bonds or notes in such manner, 
either at public or private sale, for such price, at such 
rate or rates of interest, or at such discount in lieu 
of interest, as it may determine will best effect the 
purposes of this act. 

The board may issue interim receipts or temporary 
bonds, with or without coupons, exchangeable for 
definitive bonds when such bonds shall have been ex- 
ecuted and are available for delivery. The board may 
also provide for the replacement of any bonds which 
shall have become mutilated or shall have been des- 
troyed or lost. 

In the discretion of the board, any bonds issued here- 
under may be secured by a resolution of the board 
or by a trust agreement between the board and a cor- 
porate trustee, which may be any trust company or 
bank having the powers of a trust company within 
or without the Commonwealth, and such trust agree- 
ment shall be in such form and executed in such 
manner as may be determined by the board. Such 
trust agreement or resolution may pledge or assign, 
in whole or in part, the revenues and other moneys 
held or to be received by the board, including the 
revenues from any improvements already existing 
when the pledge or assignment is made, and any con- 
tract or other rights to receive the same, whether then 
existing or thereafter coming into existence and 
whether then held or thereafter acquired by the 
board, and proceeds thereof. Such trust agreement 
or resolution may contain such provisions for protec- 
ting and enforcing the rights, security and remedies 
of the bondholders as may, in the discretion of the 
board, he reasonable and proper and not in viola- 
tion of law, including, without limiting the generali- 
ty of the foregoing, provisions defining defaults and 
providing for remedies in the event thereof which may 
include the acceleration of maturities and covenants 
setting forth the duties of, and limitations on, the 
board in relation to the acquisition, construction, im- 
provement, enlargement, alteration, equipping, fur- 
nishing, maintanenace, use, operation, repair, 
insurance and disposition of property of the district, 
the custody, safeguarding, investment and applica- 
tion of moneys, the issue of additional or refunding 
bonds, the fixing, revision and collection of fees, 
rates, rents, assessments or other charges, the use of 
any surplus bond proceeds, the establishment of re- 
serves, and the making and amending of contracts. 



In addition to other security provided herein or other- 
wise by law, bonds or notes issued by the district 
under any provision of this act, including section six 
thereof, may be secured, in whole or in part, by let- 
ters of credit issued to the district by any bank, trust 
company or other financial institution, within or 
without the Commonwealth, and the board may 
pledge or assign any of its revenues as security for the 
reimbursement by the district to the issuers of such 
letters of credit of any payments made under the let- 
ters of credit. 

It shall be lawful for any bank or trust company to 
act as depository or trustee of the proceeds of bonds, 
revenues or other moneys under any such trust agree- 
ment or resolution and to furnish such indemnifica- 
tion or pledge such securities and issue such letters 
or credit as may be required by the board. Any such 
trust agreement or resolution may set forth the rights 
and remedies of bondholders and of the trustee and 
may restrict the individual right of action by bond- 
holders. In addition to the foregoing, any such trust 
agreement or resolution may contain such other pro- 
visions as the board may deem reasonable and pro- 
per for the security of bondholders. Any pledge of 
revenues or other property made by the board under 
this action shall be valid and binding and shall be 
deemed continuously perfected for the purposes of 
chapter one hundred and six of the General Laws 
from the time when the pledge is made; the revenues, 
moneys, rights and proceeds so pledged and then held 
or thereafter acquired or received by the board shall 
immediately be subject to the lien of such pledge 
without any physical delivery or segregation thereof 
or further act; and the lien of any such pledge shall 
be valid and binding against all parties having claims 
of any kind in tort, contract or otherwise against the 
board, irrespective of whether such parties have 
notice thereof. Neither the resolution, any trust 
agreement nor any other agreement by which a 
pledge is created need be filed or recorded except in 
the records of the board , and no filing need be made 
under the provisions of said chapter one hundred and 



Any holder of a bond or note issued by the district 
under the provisions of this act or any of the coupons 
appertaining thereto and any trustee under a trust 
agreement or resolution securing the same, except 
to the extent the rights herein given may be restricted 
by such trust agreement or resolution, may bring suit 
upon the bonds, notes, or coupons and may, either 
at law or in equity, by suit, action, mandamus, or 
other proceedings for legal or equitable relief, in- 
cluding proceedings for the appointment of a receiver 
to take possession and control of the business pro- 
perties of the board, to operate and maintain the 
same to make any necessary repairs, renewals and 
replacements in respect thereof and to fix, revise and 
collect fees and charges, protect and enforce any and 



48 



all rights under the laws of the Commonwealth or 
granted hereunder or under such trust agreement, 
resolution or other agreement, and may enforce and 
compel the performance of all duties required by this 
act or by such trust agreement or resolution to be 
performed by the board or by any officer thereof. 

SECTION 9. The board may issue refunding bonds 
for the purpose of paying any of its bonds at maturi- 
ty or upon acceleration of redemption. Refunding 
bonds may be issued at such time or times prior to 
the maturity or redemption of the refunded bonds 
as the board deems to be in the public interest. 
Refunding bonds may be issued in sufficient amounts 
to pay or provide the principal of the bonds being 
refunded, together with any redemption premium 
thereon, any interest accrued or to accrue to the date 
of payment of such bonds, the expenses of issue of 
refunding bonds, the expenses of redeeming bonds 
being refunded and such reserves for debt service or 
other capital or current expenses from the proceeds 
of such refunding bonds as may be required by a trust 
agreement or resolution securing bonds. The issue 
of refunding bonds, the maturities and other details 
thereof, the security therefore, the rights of the 
holders thereof, and the right, duties and obligations 
of the board in respect of the same shall be govern- 
ed by the provisions of this act relating to the issue 
of bonds other than refunding bonds insofar as the 
same may be applicable. 

SECTION 10. Bonds, notes, and other evidences of 
indebtedness issued or entered into under the provi- 
sions of this act shall not be deemed to be a debt or 
a pledge of the faith and credit of the Commonwealth 
or the Town of Chelmsford, but shall be payable sole- 
ly from the revenues of the district. All bonds, notes 
and other evidences of indebtedness shall contain on 
the face thereof a statement to the effect that neither 
the Commonwealth nor the Town of Chelmford shall 
be obligated to pay the same and that neither the 
faith and credit nor the taxing power of the Com- 
monwealth or of the Town of Chelmsford is pledged 
to the payment of the principal of or interest on such 
bonds or notes. Each bond shall also recite whether 
it is a general obligation of the district or a special 
obligation thereof payable solely from particular 
funds pledged to its payment. Each bond or note shall 
bear on its face the words, Chelmsford Center In- 
dustrial Sewer District Loan, Act of 1985. The out- 
standing debt of the district shall not exceed in the 
aggregate, two million dollars. Each authorized issue 
shall constitute a separate loan and such loans shall 
be payable in not more than twenty years from their 
dates. Any indebtedness issued under this act with 
the exception of renewal notes issued pursuant to sec- 
tion six or refunding bonds issued pursuant to sec- 
tion nine shall be issued within two years of the 
effective date of this act. Indebtedness incurred under 
this act shall be limited to the issuance of bonds or 
notes as herein provided, and any other provision of 
the General Laws permitting the district to incur ad- 
ditional debt shall not be applicable. 



SECTION 11. All moneys received pursuant to the 
provisions of this act, whether as proceeds from the 
issue of bonds or as revenue or otherwise, shall be 
deemed to be trust funds to be held and applied solely 
as provided in this act. 

SECTION 12. Bonds or notes issued under the pro- 
visions of this act are hereby made securities in which 
all public officers and public bodies of the Common- 
wealth and its political subsidivions, all insurance 
companies, commercial departments of trust com- 
panies, savings banks, co-operative banks, banking 
associations, investment companies, executors, ad- 
ministrators, trustees and other fiduciaries may pro- 
perly and legally invest funds, including capital in 
their control or belonging to them. Such bonds or 
notes are hereby made securities which may proper- 
ly and legally be deposited with and received by any 
state or municipal officer or any agency or political 
subdivision of the Commonwealth for any purpose 
for which the deposit of bonds or obligations of the 
Commonwealth is now or may hereafter be authoriz- 
ed by law. 

SECTION 13. Notwithstanding any of the provisions 
of this act or any recitals in any bonds issued under 
this act, all such bonds shall be deemed to be invest- 
ment securities under the provisions of chapter one 
hundred and six of the General Laws. 

SECTION 14. Bonds or notes may be issued under 
this act without obtaining the consent of the 
emergency finance board established under the pro- 
visions of chapter forty-nine of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and thirty-three or of any department, divi- 
sion, commission, board, bureau or agency of the 
Commonwealth or the town, and without any other 
proceedings or the happening of any other conditions 
or things than those proceedings, conditions or things 
which are specifically required therefor by this act, 
and the validity of and security for any bonds or notes 
issued by the district shall not be affected by the ex- 
istence or nonexistence of any such consent or other 
proceedings, conditions or things. 

SECTION 15. The district and all its revenues, in- 
come and real and personal property shall be exempt 
from taxation and from betterments and special 
assessments and the district shall not be required to 
pay any tax, excise or assessment to or for the Com- 
monwealth or any of its political subsidivions. Bonds 
or notes issued by the district and their transfer and 
the income therefrom, including any profit made on 
the sale thereof, shall at all times be exempt from 
taxation within the Commonwealth. 

SECTION 16. The board shall at all times keep full 
and accurate accounts of its receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements, assets and liabilities, which shall be 
open to inspection by any officer or duly appointed 
agent of the Commonwealth of the town. The district 
shall operate on a fiscal year commencing July first 



49 



unless otherwise provided by the board. Before the 
issuance of any bonds under the provisions of this act 
any member or officer of the board charged with 
responsibility for the issuance thereof, shall each ex- 
ecute a surety bond in the sum of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars payable to the district, or in lieu thereof 
the board shall obtain a blanket position bond cover- 
ing any member or officer of the board charged with 
responsibility for the issuance of any bonds in the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars, such surety bonds 
to be conditioned upon the faithful performance of 
the duties of their offices, to be executed by a surety 
company authorized to transact business in the Com- 
monwealth as surety and approved by the board. 

SECTION 17. Upon termination or dissolution of the 
district, the title to all funds and other properties 
owned by it which remain after payment or the mak- 
ing of provision for payment of all bonds and other 
obligations of the board shall vest in the town. If upon 
any such termination or dissolution any bonds or 
notes of the board shall be outstanding, such bonds 
or notes, shall continue to be payable solely from the 
revenues and other property pledged therefor and 
shall not be or become a debt or obligation of the 
town except to the extent of such pledge. 

No law affecting the powers, rights, duties, or obliga- 
tions of the board shall be effective unless it shall app- 
ly to sewer districts generally or shall have been 
approved under the provisions of Article 2 of the 
Amendments to the Constitution of the Common- 
wealth. 

SECTION 18. The provisions of this act shall be 
deemed to provide an exclusive, additional, alterna- 
tive and complete method of the doing of the things 
authorized hereby and shall be deemed and con- 
strued to be supplemental and additional to, and not 
in derogation of, powers conferred upon the board 
by law; provided, however, that insofar as the provi- 
sions of this act are inconsistent with the provisions 
of any general or special law, administrative order 
or regulation, or the by-laws of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, the provisions of this act shall be controlling. 
Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, no 
provision of the by-laws of the Town of Chelmsford 
requiring the ratification by the voters of certain bond 
issues shall apply to the issuance of bonds of the 
district pursuant to this act, nor shall the provisions 
of chapter forty-four of the General Laws be applic- 
able to the manner of voting or the limitations as to 
amount and time of payment of debts incurred by 
the district. 

SECTION 19. The district shall be dissolved by vote 
of the board one year from the date all debt issued 
by the district has been retired and all liabilities of 
the district have been satisfied fully. No further ac- 
tion of the Town of Chelmsford or the Common- 
wealth shall be required to dissolve the district. 



SECTION 20. This act, being necessary for the 
welfare of the town and its inhabitants, shall be 
liberally construed to effect the purposes hereof. 

SECTION 21. This act shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Ready moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate 
and execute all contracts and agreements including 
agreements with Chelmsford Center Sewer District, and 
Private Industry, for the purpose of sewer services by and 
between the Town of Chelmsford and Chelmsford Center 
Industrial Sewer District, and authorized the Board of 
Selectmen to execute all necessary and proper warrants and 
agreements with the Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer 
District. 

Selectman Ready stated that the Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Finance Committee was 
in favor. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Ready moved that the 
Town vote to transfer the amount of eleven thousand one 
hundred seventy-six and 10/100 dollars ($11,176.10) from 
Article 6, of the Special Town Meeting of November 19, 
1984, and to raise and appropriate the amount of eight 
hundred twenty-three and 90/100 dollars ($823.90) to 
alleviate certain drainage problems on Weide Street. 

Selectman Ready explained that presently the water on 
the street was running onto private property, and that the 
amount requested was left from the Dunshire Drive pro- 
ject, this was just a transfer of the monies all ready voted 
on to a new project. The Finance Committee supported 
the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Ready moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of forty-three 
thousand six hundred twenty-two and 00/100 dollars 
($43,622.00) to be transferred to the following salary and 
expense line items in the indicated specific amounts to fund 
approved wage and salary increases and expense alloca- 
tions in the following departmental accounts: 

Cemetery Department: 

Line Item #12 Salaries $ 4,717.00 

Line Item #13 Expenses 400.00 

Highway Department: 

Line Item #40 Salaries $36,000.00 

Line Item #41 Expenses 2,000.00 

Veterans Benefits Department: 

Line Item #116 Salaries $ 505.00 

For a total figure of $43,622.00 

The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Highway and Cemetery Departments had settled their con- 
tracts and these were the negotiated figures. The Finance 
Committee did not approve of the 7% increase in salaries. 
Selectman Paul Hart spoke in favor of the Highway De- 



50 



partment figures. Due to Prop. 2 V£ , this department was 
reduced the most and he felt that they had done an ex- 
cellent job despite the cut backs, and deserved the amount 
requested. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
carried. 

The Moderator adjourned the meeting at 8:25 PM due 
to the business at hand being completed. Motion carried. 

Dennis McHugh Mary E. St.Hilaire 

Moderator Town Clerk 



51 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Janet Lombard, Chairman 

Ruth K. Delaney James McBride 

Diane M. Phillips, Assistant to the Assessors 

Activity in the Assessors Office this year has continued 
its pattern of the past few years with a growth of almost 
ten percent in building permits and approximately one- 
tenth of the properties in town changing ownership. Growth 
in the residential area has outpaced last year's record 
numbers with a 34% increase in single family residential 
permits to 94, and a 70% increase in condominiums to 
504, with an added 22 conversions of duplex units. Four 
new residential subdivisions of significant size have been 
developed in previously tranquil areas of East and South 
Chelmsford, with smaller pockets of growth scattered 
throughout the community. More frequently we are see- 
ing smaller (2 to 6 unit) multiple residences also convert- 
ing to condominiums, further tightening the rental market. 

There has been a marked decrease in industrial building 
activity this year, and much of last year's construction along 
Route 129 as well as some relatively new facilities on Alpha 
Road, Elizabeth Drive and Riverneck Road stand vacant 
due to the settling out in the computer industry. Although 
the Selectmen had indicated that it was their inclination 
to tax industrial and commercial properties at a higher rate 
than residential properties, it would seem that this is not 
the year to take this approach. 

Of the $45,000,000 in new value, which allowed the town 
to raise an additional 51,000,000 in taxes, a major portion 
was derived from condominiums and single family residen- 
tial properties which make up 80% of our tax base. We 
have a potential for that much added value in condo- 
miniums alone, as well as a third of that amount from new 
homes for the next fiscal year. Unfortunately, this type of 
growth is the most expensive for the town in terms of 
services. 

Estimated tax bills were sent this year in anticipation 
of our Fiscal 1986 triennial certification of new values for 
real estate and personal property. The update was done 
with the firm of M.M.C., Inc., who have performed the 
last two complete revaluations, acting as consultants to the 
Board. The tax bills which will be issued in the spring will 
be based on these new values. Property owners will be 
notified when they may review their new valuations in the 
Assessors Office before the tax bills are mailed. 

Having completed an external review of all residential 
properties in the past three years, the office, as required 
by the Department of Revenue, is now embarking on a 
three year cycle of interior inspections in perparation for 
our next certification. This process will be ongoing. 

We do not yet have our in-house computer but have 
asked to be a pilot community for the Department of 
Revenus CAMA (Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal) pro- 
gram. We are also participating in the townwide computer 
use survey. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Janet Lombard 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



COMMISSION MEMBERS 

Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman 
Mrs. Charlotte P. DeWolf 
Dr. Everett V. Olsen 



Term Expires 

1986 
1987 
1988 



ANNUAL REPORT 



In 1985 the total number of burials in the Chelmsford 
cemeteries was 145. The number of burials in each 
cemetery was: 

79 Pine Ridge 

45 Fairview 

8 West Chelmsford 

7 Heart Pond 

5 Riverside 

1 Forefathers 

The number of lots sold in the year, 1985, was 111. 

In Riverside Cemetery the roads at the top of the hill 
have been hot topped, and plans have been made to have 
a guard rail installed in this cemetery. 

In West Chelmsford Cemetery there is new fencing be- 
ing installed at this time. 

In Heart Pond Cemetery new signs have been put in with 
the correct spelling which has been determined after check- 
ing historical records. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Dr. Paul Canniff 

Vice Chairman Peter Dulchinos 

Clerk Paul McCarthy 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Richard J. Day 

Health Inspector John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Office Manager Diana L. Wright 

Town Nurse Judith Dunigan 

Town Physician Michael Dean, M.D. 

Septage and Wasteware Abatement Program 

In 1985 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing and 
water sampling program and positive results are being seen. 
Numerous tests have been performed by the Board of 
Health along with the issuance of one-hundred forty-four 
septic system permits (repair) and one-hundred and sixty- 
nine septic system permits (new) with an increasing per- 
centage of commercial, industrial and condominium 
buildings. 



52 



Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation Tests -250 $ 6,250 

Deep Tests-585 14,625 

Sewage Repair Permits— 144 2,175 

Sewage Construction Permits— 169 7,165 

Miscellaneous License and Fees 6,778 

Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1985 five inspections were made at day care 
centers; thirty inspections made for Chapter II, Housing; 
ten school inspections; complaints received and checked, 
two-hundred ninety-eight; Camp Paul inspections, eight; 
bathing beaches, twenty-four inspections; International 
Certificates of Vaccination, ten; restaurants and retail food 
store inspections; one-hundred four establishments were in- 
spected at least twice during the year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

The Board of Health, because of new local and state laws 
and public awareness in the areas of hazardous waste 
disposal, has been called upon to coordinate all phases of 
hazardous waste activities. 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was ap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to 
enforce the new "Right-to-Know" law for this town. The 
position encompasses actions between the State, Federal 
agencies, business community and the general public. 

Household Hazardous Waste Day 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has open- 
ed up a whole new area to be monitored. A number of in- 
cidents have required a cooperative effort between the town 
and DEQE officials. It is the goal of the Board of Health, 
along with other town departments, to keep abreast of all 
current changes and updates in the handling and disposal 
of all toxic wastes and to supersede any State and Federal 
standards where it would best serve to protect this com- 
munity and its precious water supplies. With this in mind, 
the Board of Health will hold a Household Hazardous 
Waste Day on May 3. 1986. 

Communicable Disease Program 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health man- 
dates that an epidemiological investigation be undertaken 
on approximately forty-three communicable diseases. 
When a communicable disease is reported to the Health 
Department by a physician or hospital, the nurse contacts 
the person involved to ascertain if a probable source of the 
infection can be determined. Concerns in relation to com- 
municability of the disease are discussed and, as is the case 
in some communicable diseases, food handlers or family 
members are removed from their jobs during the period 
of communicability. The follow-up report is submitted to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1985: 



Hepatitis A 1 

Viral Meningitis 1 

Salmonella 20 

Campylobacter Enteritis 5 

Giardiasis 2 

Tuberculosis Control Program 60 

(Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic) 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom 
from that disease is another responsibility of the Town 
Nurse. One-hundred two mantoux (TB) tests were given 
to town residents for pre-employment and to household 
contacts of active cases in compliance with the Massachu- 
setts Department of Public Health regulations. Home visits 
and telephone calls are made to families of active and some 
inactive tuberculosis cases on a periodic basis to insure 
understanding of the illness and that adequate medical 
follow-up is achieved. Numerous medical records are kept 
and updated on residents who have a positive (TB) man- 
toux test and are receiving medication prophylactically and 
being followed radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic. 

AIDS and Venereal Disease are reported by the physi- 
cian directly to the State Department of Public Health to 
maintain patient confidentiality. 

Maternal/Child Health — High Risk Infant Identifica- 
tion Program 

Telephone correspondence is made to the parents of 
premature or High Risk Infants. Home visits are made by 
the nurse when deemed necessary to assist the mother 
and/or assess the development of the premature infant. 
Other home visits are made by physician referral. These 
follow-ups are not only made for health supervision, but 
for education and referrals when indicated. One High Risk 
Infant was reported in 1985. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. The vaccine was offered to the 
elderly and all others with chronic illness regardless of age, 
as recommended by the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health. Eighty-eight persons were immunized with 
pneumonia vaccine and seven-hundred forty persons were 
immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. An additional one- 
hundred sixty doses were given to nursing homes, forty doses 
to school nurses for staff and eighteen home visits were 
made to handicapped or house-bound residents. A total 
of nine-hundred fifty-eight doses of flu vaccine were ad- 
ministered in town, provided free by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. 

Several immunizations were administered to update 
students records in compliance with the Massachusetts 
School Immunization Laws. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board 
of Health, Town Offices. 



53 



Diabetic Screening Program 

The Health Department has an Ames Glucometer for 
the purpose of conducting blood sugar screenings. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time, involves a small sample of blood 
by finger prick method, and can be done either fasting or 
two hours after meals. Residents may call the Health 
Department office and make an appointment with the 
nurse. 

Community Health 

Good health maintenance is a concern of everyones. The 
town's second health fair was held in the spring and ap- 
proximately 200-300 residents received free health screen- 
ings and counseling on health awareness and maintenance. 
The Health Fair brought together numerous health ex- 
hibitors and offered free health screenings that included: 
Blood pressure, height and weight, vision and glaucoma, 
blood sugar, oral cancer, anemia blood test, EKG's and 
several more. Professional exhibitors were available for con- 
sultation and resource material. This year's Health Fair will 
be held April 5, 1986 at the McCarthy Jr. High School, 
North Road. 

CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority continues to be ac- 
tive in applying for additional housing units. The Hous- 
ing Authority in August 1985 submitted to the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development an application for the 
Section 8 Housing Voucher Program. The Chelmsford 
Housing Authority in December 1985 received an award 
for twenty-five units under the Section 8 Housing Voucher 
Program. Under this program applicants have no rent ceil- 
ing on the units, but subsidy is still restricted. Thus, ap- 
plicants can better compete with the private market for 
rental units. The Chelmsford Housing Authority also ex- 
pects in early 1986 to apply for additional low-income 
elderly and family units under the State Executive Office 
of Communities and Development. The goal of the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority is to build or rehabilitate 
sixty units of elderly housing and and fifteen units of family 
housing. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs at pre- 
sent now provide a total of two hundred and thirty-four 
units of low-income housing; twenty-one handicapped, 
seventy family and one hundred and forty-three elderly 
units. Five of the Chelmsford Housing programs are funded 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Ex- 
ecutive Office of Communities and Development under 
Chapter 667; Chelmsford Arms completed in 1974, fifty- 
six regular units and eight handicapped units; the Com- 
munity Residence purchased in 1974 for the mildly to 
moderately retarded, eight units; six condominiums in 
Pickwick Estates were purchased in 1984; McFarlin Manor 
completed in 1981, forty-three regular units, three han- 
dicapped units, one four-bedroom congregate unit which 
serves the "semi-independent elderly." Under Chapter 707, 
the Chelmsford Housing Authority "scattered site" pro- 
gram which started in 1974, there are twenty-two units 
under lease in the private market. The Section B Existing 
Housing Program presently has fifty-five units under lease 



with twenty-five new units coming under lease with the Sec- 
tion 8 Voucher Program. The Chelmsford Housing 
Authority most recent financial statement lists assets at 
$3,596,204.89, liabilities at $3,596,204.89 for all 
developments. The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board 
of Commissioners attended in June 1985 a state sponsored 
training course at Tufts University. The training course 
was the first ever sponsored by the State for Commissioners. 
All developments are formally inspected every six months 
by staff and once a year by members of the Authority. The 
Authority is especially grateful to those organizations which 
express special concern for the Chelmsford Housing 
Authority residents and to the Chelmsford Garden Clubs 
for their assistance in the beautification of the 
developments every year. 

Members of the staff include Lisa Royce, Executive 
Director; Helen Cantara, Senior Clerk; Richard O'Neil, 
Maintenance Laborer part-time and Robert Trainor, 
Maintenance Laborer full time. Regular meetings are held 
at McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m. on the 
first Tuesday each month. The annual meeting is the first 
Tuesday in May. All meetings are opened to the public. 
The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commis- 
sioners would like to thank the residents of Chelmsford and 
Town Officials for their continued support and 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 

William P. Keohane, Treasurer 

Pamela Turnbull, Assistant Treasurer 

Claude A. Harvey, Member 






54 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Augustine Kish, Chairman Littleton 

Irene Machemer, Vice-Chairman Townsend 

David Snow, Secretary Chelmsford 

Jane Barry Groton 

William Buxton Pepperell 

Thomas Carey Chelmsford 

Stratos Dukakis Chelmsford 

Robert Manning Shirley 

Charlotte Scott Westford 

Cecile Stefanski Westford 

ALTERNATES 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 




Littleton 


Kevin Finnegan 




Westford 


Edward Mitchell 




Townsend 


L. Peter Noddin 




Shirley 


Jordan Waugh 




Groton 


Ronald Wetmore 




Chelmsford 


Paul Wright 




Pepperell 


ADMINISTRATION 


Bernholdt Nystrom 


Supe: 


rintendent-Director 


Charles Valera 


Assistant 


Director Principal 


David McLaughlin 


Assistant Director/Vocational 


Everett Olsen, Jr. 




Business Manager 


Paul Royte 


Director 


of Pupil Personnel 


Thomas Eng 




Dean of Students 


Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enrollment as 


of October 1, 1985 was as 


follows: 




Chelmsford 




221 


Groton 




70 


Littleton 




59 


Pepperell 




94 


Shirley 




78 


Townsend 




69 


Westford 




168 


Tuitioned 




4 



Total 



763 



The following programs are offered at Nashoba Tech: 

Technical Programs 

Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Electronics 

Auto Body Horticulture/ Landscaping 

Automotive Machine 

Baking Medical Occupations 

Carpentry Metal Fabrication 

Culinary Arts Painting and Decorating 

Data Processing Plumbing and Heating 

Drafting Printing 

Electrical Welding 

Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, 
a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or over. 
Participants from all communities are welcome to par- 
ticipate in the many diversified courses which are offered 
during both the fall and spring semesters. This year 939 
students enrolled in our Adult Education Program. 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

The Park Commissioners elected Robert W. Wetmore, 
Chairman at their annual organizational meeting. 

The department continued with their maintenance pro- 
gram, reseeding wherever necessary. 

We thank all departments for their continued assistance 
with the support and assistance of the Garden Clubs and 
citizens of Chelmsford. 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School was designed 
and built for a capacity of 800 students. Over the past 
decade, the record of employment for our graduates has 
averaged approximately 95%. Each year qualified seniors 
may elect to take advantage of our Co-op Training Pro- 
gram which allows senior students to work in industry dur- 
ing their shop weeks and receive valuable training in their 
chosen fields as well as a salary. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
and provides its students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, co-op program, high school diploma, trade cer- 
tificate and an opportunity for further education and job 
placement. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert W. Wetmore, Chairman 
Eileen M. Duffy 
Mary P. Bennett 

Donald P. Gray, Superintendent 



55 



2QNING MAP, 




PLANNING BOARD 



John F. McCarthy, Chairman 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Rosalind M. Boyle, Clerk 

Ann H. McCarthy 

Eugene E. Gilet 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 

Charles A. Parlee 

Recording Clerk, Kris Gleason 

The Chelmsford Planning Board began the year by 
reorganizing the Board and appointed Mr. John F. McCar- 
thy as Chairman, Mr. Thomas E. Firth, Jr. as Vice Chair- 
man and Mrs. Rosalind M. Boyle as Clerk. Mr. Eugene 
Gilet is the representative to the Northern Middlesex Area 
Commission. 

After conducting Public Hearings, the Planning Board 
approved 12 subdivisions in Town under the Subdivision 
Control Law. The largest single subdivision was for 71 lots 
on Marshall Street. Two of the other approved subdivisions 
(Park Road and Montview Road) had 10 lots. The others 
consisted of 2 and 3 lots. The Board also granted 62 final 
approvals under Subsdivision Control Law Not Required. 

After much deliberation 18 site plans were approved. 
With the newly strengthened site plan regulations, the 
Planning Board was able to request numerous modifica- 
tions to the new buildings in order to make the more com- 
patible to the surrounding areas. Four of the above 
mentioned approved plans: Church of Christ (North Road), 



Gamma Industries (Riverneck Road), Sunny Acres Nurs- 
ing Home (Billerica Road) and Alexander's Market (Drum 
Hill Shopping Plaza) were additions to existing buildings. 

The Board was able to have the developers of the Mill 
Road area do reconstruction on that road this past year. 
A public hearing was held for the reconstruction and the 
developer provided the engineering work and paid to have 
the construction costs for the road work. 

The Master Plan, which was funded by the November 
1984 Special Town Meeting will be presented to the voters 
at the 1986 Annual Town Meeting. This plan has been 
devised by members of the Master Plan Committee which 
consisted of members from various regulatory Boards in 
Town and citizens from the community. At this point, since 
most of the Town is developed, one major issue seems to 
be drainage. Sewerage is scheduled to begin its first phase 
in the spring of 1986 and the Board would like to see the 
sewerage tied into the drainage situation as would the 
Selectmen. The Board is most sensitive to the drainage pro- 
blems of the Town and would like to work in a positive man- 
ner to rectify these problems. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. McCarthy, Chairman 



56 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

Janet Hendl, Chairperson 

Susan B. Cantin, Vice-Chairperson 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 

Mark Gauthier, Secretary 

Lorraine Lambert 

Brenda McBermott 



Department Heads: 

Reference: Priscilla Vaughn 
Children's: Cheryl Zani 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Technical Services: Nancy Jo Brown 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Maintenance: Al Varoski 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Ellen Rauch 
Director 



Library activities in 1985 took many forms — from unveil- 
ing to the public the discovery of a fine A.F. Tait pain- 
ting in Adams, to the extremely well-organized and 
successful Friends of the Library book sale, to a full calen- 
dar of Library programs for all ages, to the beginning of 
some building improvements at the MacKay Branch. 

The Friends of the Library funded much-appreciated 
gifts for the Library, including electric typewriters for 
public use, a slide projector, record player, microfiche 
Boston Globe and passes to several museums. The 
Chelmsford Cultural Council funded children's summer 
programs and a video archive collection. Appreciation is 
due as well to the many individuals who made donations 
or contributed to the gift fund. 

Personnel changes included the retirement of the Direc- 
tor, Ann E. Gallmeyer for health reasons; Rona Call, 
MacKay Branch librarian, and John Zeleneski, 
maintenance assistant, joined the staff. On the Board of 
Trustees, Roger Welch completed 30 years of valued and 
dedicated service to the Library as a trustee. Mark Gauthier 
and Susan B. Cantin were elected to the Board. 

Library goals for 1986 include the completion of a com- 
prehensive library study with a community analysis and 
surveys of residents. This study will help the Library 
trustees, director and staff to evaluate current services, 
facilities, staffing, collections and relationships with other 
agencies. With that information the Library will develop 
a long-range plan for improving the services the Library 
can deliver to community residents. 

I would like to thank the Trustees, staff, friends and 
patrons of the Library — all of whom have made 
Chelmsford a welcoming town for the new director. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 



Monies deposited 


with the 




Town Treasurer 




$30,317 


Circulation 




222.697 


Staff (full-time) 




10 


(part-time) 




10.4 FTE's 


pages 




1.2 FTE's 



57 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. 


Bum, Jr. 


Judith A. 


Olsson 


Janet F. Bonica 








Chairman 








REGISTERED 


ENROLLED VOTERS 


UNENROLLED 


PRECINCT 


VOTERS 


DEMOCRATIC 


REPUBLICAN 


VOTERS 


1 


1,631 


508 






369 


754 


2 


1,071 


431 






164 


476 


3 


2,038 


616 






291 


1,131 


4 


642 


299 






78 


265 


5 


2,093 


615 






361 


1,117 


6 


1,477 


535 






268 


674 


7 


1,240 


435 






176 


629 


8 


1,209 


368 






264 


577 


9 


1,064 


371 






131 


562 


10 


1,939 


575 






346 


1,018 


11 


1,055 


399 






187 


469 


12 


1,670 


546 






254 


870 


TOTALS 


17,129 


5,698 






2,889 


8,542 



58 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Carl Olsson, Chairman 
Samuel Poulten, Vice Chairman 
Carol C. Cleven, Secretary 

Sean Szekely, Student Member 



James B rough 
Nicholas G. Gavriel 



59 



THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1985 
COMPARATIVE DATA 

Teaching Positions Administrative 





Student 


(including) 


(Bldg. & Central 


Other 




Years 


Enrollment 


Specialists) 


Office) 


Personnel 


Budget 


1979-80 


7,940 


526 


39 


234 


14,435,848 


1980-81 


7,477 


513 


39 


222 


15,496,000 


1981-82 


6,980 


390 


31 


212 


14,543,772 


1982-83 


6,512 


371 


30 


207 


15,050,709 


1983-84 


6,103 


371 


29 


207 


15,798,307 


1984-85 


5,839 


356 


28 


206 


16,716,207 


1985-86 


5,652 


348 


25 


206 


17,896,684 


1985-87 proj. 


5,474 


342 


26 


206 





During the calendar year 1985, the State Legislature 
passed our new Educational Reform Bill. This bill, Chapter 
188, is multi-faceted and far reaching. Some of the key 
components are: 

School Improvement Councils 

Local councils have been established at each of our 
elementary schools consisting of: the Principal, three 
(3) teachers, two (2) parents and one citizen at large. 
The intent of these councils is to improve the qual- 
ity of education at the school building level by ex- 
panding services to students, increasing community 
and parent involvement and developing business and 
education partnerships. 

Establishment of Basic Skills, Minimum Standards, 
and Curriculum Assessments 

This portion of the legislation will not go into effect 
until September 1, 1987. Presently, there are task 
forces throughout the state developing the guidelines 
for the above. 

A Variety of Competitive Grants to Further Excellence 
in Education 

These grants' requests are reviewed and awards given 

according to the following criteria: 
...Financial Need 
...Overall Educational Program 
...Use of Technology in Education 

Teaching Learning Corps 

This program will pay college students to serve as in- 
structional aides in low income school districts. 

Improving Teacher and Administrator Performance 

...Horace Mann Teacher 

Establish Programs for expanded respon- 
sibilities for teachers 

...Evaluation of Staff 

Committees are presently working on develop- 
ing guidelines for procedures and regulations 
to evaluate teachers and administrators. 

...Lucretia Crocker Program 

The Board of Education will award fellowships 
to teachers to develop, replicate and dissemin- 



ate exemplary programs. 

...Leadership Academy 

The Board of education will establish a pro- 
gram to provide training to school adminis- 
trators in evaluation of personnel, parent and 
community relations, school based manage- 
ment, curriculum development and other ap- 
propriate areas. 

. . . Professional Development Grants 

This grant program will provide funds to each 
community. The local School Committee and 
the teachers' collective bargaining organization 
will determine how the grant will be disbursed. 

As one can see, the Chelmsford School Department has 
been quite busy digesting and preparing to implement all 
of the appropriate proportions of the Educational Reform 
Bill. 

Meanwhile education in the classroom marches on. 
Calendars are established, programs planned and im- 
plemented, and we continue to graduate students who go 
into the workforce or college or both prepared for what 
faces them. Much of this success is due to the always 
dedicated professional and support staff and the citizenry 
who have backed the school department year after year. 

The final test of a school department's success lies in the 
success of its students as perceived by the townspeople and 
hard data such as test results; local, state, and national 
competition; and on formal and informal surveys. Based 
on these criteria, the Chelmsford School System has been 
successful. However, not willing to maintain the status quo, 
greater and more intelligent efforts will even enhance the 
reputation of an already fine school system. It is impor- 
tant that citizens participate actively in school issues and 
express their concerns to the School Committee in order 
to ensure that the best decisions possible are made for the 
education of the young people of Chelmsford. The school 
system welcomes suggestions from any and all individuals. 

The budget format analyzes the proposed school budget 
in three different ways: 



60 



1. Line items (salaries, texts, supplies, utilities, transpor- 
tation, etc.) 

2. Program areas (English, Math, Reading, Science, 
Special Ed., etc. 

3. Cost centers (Byam, Harrington, Parker, South Row, 
Westlands, McCarthy, and the High School). 

The format is part of a continuing process by which 
Chelmsford school programs are developed, implemented, 
funded and evaluated. This budget format serves to focus 
the committee's attention on both effective and weak pro- 
grams, enabling the committee to monitor spending rates 
and levels of program achievement. By studying implemen- 
tation of the budget throughout the year, the committee 
is able to ascertain the programs that need greater or less 
financial support and to identify the factors that guide the 
budget. 

The School Committee believes that the budget con- 
tained in this Annual Town Report lives up to the town's 
educational expectations. The budget process, over the last 
several years, has produced a tighter, more efficiently man- 
aged budget. The committee feels that the overall condi- 
tion of the school system remains strong. Where an orderly 
contraction of the system appears advisable, the Commit- 
tee will consider its implementation. 

The following reports written by school personnel will 
provide you with a sampling of the accomplishments of our 
young people as well as a better understanding of the lear- 
ning environment and the practical experiences present in 
our schools today. 



media. The "Young at Heart" crew, made up of 
Chelmsford's finest senior citizens, produced a great show 
each month and increased their audience at the same time. 
High school students produced "The Lion's Tale" every 
two weeks, the Crafters continued to produce their fine 
series explaining how to create beautiful handcrafted 
items, and Cookie Sughrue produced another series of ex- 
ercise programs for all ages. 

The Cable 43 Educational Foundation held its first ever 
telethon to raise money for new equipment for Cable 43. 
The live telecast from Old Town Hall on May 18 ran from 
10:00 AM to 10:00 PM and featured some of Chelmsford's 
most well known faces. Thanks to the generosity of 
Chelmsford residents, over $4,200 was collected. This 
money was used to buy a new switcher, monitors, and 
character generator. Anyone interested in becoming a 
member of the Cable 43 EducationalT-bundation is en- 
couraged to call the studio at 251-8866. Memberships fees 
are: Individual -$10; Family-$25; Business -$100; 
Student — $5. 

Finally, the Chelmsford Public Library and Cable 43 
worked togehter to create an archive and circulating library 
of Cable 43 programs. Thanks to a grant from the Cultural 
Council, video cassette recorders were purchased for the 
library and the TV studio. Copies of Cable 43 programs 
are now available for checking out in the Fine Arts room 
of Adams library or patrons can view the programs at the 
library. A selection of the programs will be archived so that 
in the distant future historians and curious residents will 
be able to see what their friends and town looked like "way 
back in the 1980s." 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY TELEVISION SERVICES 

Cable 43 continued to offer a variety of locally produced 
television programs that starred Chelmsford's students, 
athletes, school committee members, selectmen, town of- 
ficials, and community members. Over 1,025 hours of pro- 
gramming were telecast during the year. That averaged 
20 hours of programming per week. Programming 
highlights included: the Fourth of July Parade, the gradua- 
tion of the class of 1985, a forum for the Democratic can- 
didates for Senator and messages from the two Republican 
candidates, "Sewerage Soup" — a live discussion of the sewer 
problem, live forums for the candidates for state represen- 
tative, and for congressman, Chemical People, holiday 
lighting ceremony, Community Band Concerts, interviews 
with Jim Shannon, Arthur Miller, Natalie Jacobson, and 
Paul Tsongas, public hearings on the proposed resource 
recovery facility, town meeting, a special program describ- 
ing the Special Education services of the Chelmsford 
Schools, and sports, sports, sports! 

The League of Women Voters, in conjunction with 
Cable 43, produced a program describing the procedures 
at town meeting. This program was honored by the state 
League as being an outstanding example of informative 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

During the past 4 years all major student and business 
reporting applications have been automated on a Digital 
1 1 11 business minicomputer. Furthermore, a VAX/750 
mainframe is also used for academic computing as well 
.is new business applications. Presently, detailed and com- 
plete reports can be generated in the area of student 
registration, attendance, report cards, rank in class, en- 
cumbrance accounting, student scheduling, personnel, 
special education, student tracking, transportation accoun- 
ting, departmental inventory and school census. 

This past year the Computer Services Department has 
been able to procure donations of computer equipment 
and supplies from private citizens. Baird Atomic Corpora- 
tion, and especially from the Digital Equipment Corpora- 
tion Warehouse. Much of this equipment was refurbished 
and installed at various administrative and academic 
locations. 

New microcomputer applications continue to be 
developed for specific needs at each of the school locations. 
Microcomputer to mainframe communications interface 
continues to be the most important obstacle to full com- 
puter resource management. 



61 



The Board of Registrars/Town Clerk's Office continues 
to use school computer resources to maintain a town cen- 
sus and voter registration data base. This alliance of school 
and municipal resources has resulted in faster reporting 
and information retrieval at a lower cost. This coming 
year's major computer effort will be in the updating and 
modifying of voter information as it relates to the new 
redistricting scheme. 

Recently developed applications are: a facilities plan- 
ning system, budget forecasting, but reporting, computer 
output on microfile for attendance, and a student rolodex 
system. Future computer applications are presently being 
evaluated in the area of student graduation requirement 
tracking, student transcript system, high school modified 
arena scheduling, microcomputer energy management 
system, elementary report cards and town accounting. 

The School Department is also studying the use of cable 
television lines for computer data and telephone com- 
munications. Technical obstacles for use and implemen- 
tation of this venture are formidable. This capability 
appears to be impossible for the short term. This issue will 
be continually researched since it has the potential to 
significantly reduce our future communications cost. 



REPORT FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
DEPARTMENT HEAD OF ENGLISH 

The High School English Department continues to adapt 
its curriculum to meet the needs of our students while 
challenging each student to meet his or her potential. 
Through the talents and efforts of our professional staff 
and the continued support of the administration, this year 
has been many positive changes. 

One major addition to our curriculum is a five week 
speech unit required for all tenth grade students. Students 
are given information useful to general communication 
situations as well as informal and formal presentations. 
With the utilization of the VCR equipment from Cable 43, 
students are afforded an opportunity to privately assess their 
own speaking patterns. To maintain a uniformity of ap- 
proach and best utilize the expertise of our current staff, 
the unit was taught by one of our teachers with extensive 
professional preparation in this area. This innovative 
assignment of staff allowed other teachers to view the 
teaching of this unit, to update their comprehension of 
developments in the teaching of speech, and share other 
possible teaching approaches for this unit — a most positive, 
successful approach to staff development. This unit has 
been well received by students and faculty in all 
departments. 

Writing skills continue to be our major priority. Our 
enrollment has increased within our writing electives. These 
courses enable students at all levels to spend an additional 
semester focusing on individual needs in writing helpful 
in course work for high school and college. Students are 
also provided an opportunity to experience the re- 



quirements and skills in the areas of journalism, technical 
writing and creative writing. In addition, through a series 
of informal workshops, the English teachers, in coordina- 
tion with our high school and town library staff, are im- 
plementing a more uniform sequence of writing 
assignments that will allow students at all levels to attain 
and re-enforce the necessary skills for formulating a 
research project. 

Our literature program not only acquaints students with 
major literary themes and writers, but more importantly 
provides opportunities to practice critical thinking skills 
so important to the students' success in any field. The 
English Department continues to provide a summer 
reading list to increase the student's enjoyment and level 
of reading performance. 

As our English curriculum continues to address the needs 
of our students for the future, our students continue to 
demonstrate their preparation for the present. Our ninth 
grade students once again placed second in Massachusetts 
in the Language Arts Olympiad, a test of grammar, spell- 
ing, vocabulary and reading comprehension. The High 
School literary magazine, Mosaics, has been awarded first 
place from Columbia University Press Association. The 
1985 yearbook, The Lion, won second prize from the 
American Scholastic Press Association. Our students are 
performing successfully on both the Verbal SAT and English 
AP exams and, after graduation, at college, and on the 
job, many of our present students are now writing for the 
local town newspapers in Lowell, Boston, and Worcester 
areas. 

Our faculty in the English Department also continues 
to receive honors and attain recognition nationally. Dr. 
Polly Clery was selected as a Fulbright Scholar to India. 
Rebecca Carosso, Liz Foster and Christine Adams have had 
writing textbooks and materials published. The greatest 
achievement for our English teachers is their continued ef- 
forts in the classroom, helping students continue Chelms- 
ford High School's love for learning — in quest for quality. 



FROM THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 

There were no dramatic changes in the Foreign 
Language Department this past year, but at CHS we did 
have two new classes of Italian I, and we also had suffi- 
cient enrollment to offer German I and German II. At the 
junior high we had a continuing German class for eighth 
grade students who had taken German the year before, 
and we had sufficient enrollment to again offer our 
language exploratory courses. CHS sent two groups of 
students to France and a group of students to Italy as part 
of the exchange program, and we also established a link 
with a school in Aachen, Germany. In March we hosted 
a group of German students, and in July a group of our 
students traveled to Germany. 



62 



Several staff members participated in a depart- 
ment/summer workshop where proficiency guidelines were 
written for each level of our modern languages. In the next 
few years we are committed to organizing our curricula 
around the concept of language proficiency. The French 
teachers also began the process of choosing a new text to 
replace the program we have been using for the last 10 
years in our French I, II and III classes. As part of this 
task the teachers made professional visits to other schools 
and evaluated a vareity of texts. Next year we anticipate 
a pilot program which will utilize a new text in a beginn- 
ing class at both the junior high and high school levels. 

Although there was not sufficient enrollment to have a 
beginning German class at the junior high, we hope to have 
a class for the 1985-86 school year. At the high school, we 
expect to offer German I, II and III. The significant 
number of students who took Italian this past year should 
provide sufficient numbers for Italian II. And the Latin 
program will expand from a 3- to a 4-year sequence. Next 
year we will be offering Spanish I Honors and French I 
Honors at CHS. Students who successfully complete one 
of these accelerated courses will be able to continue in the 
above average or honor sequences in either of these 
languages. Although the Venezuelan Exchange did not 
take place this year because our link school dropped out 
of the program, we hope to reestablish the exchange next 
year with Venezuela or another Spanish-speaking country. 



FROM THE RESOURCE INSTRUCTOR 
FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED 

The Enrichment Program of Chelmsford (EPOCH) is 
now in the fourth year. It is a program of extended enrich- 
ment and is designed to enhance the curriculum taking 
place in the classroom. 

The program model includes three types of learning ac- 
tivities. Type I activities provide "exploratory experiences" 
through the use of films and speakers. Here the students 
are encouraged to explore new ideas. Type II activities are 
the main skills component of the program. They include 
process skills which sharpen the students' creative and 
critical thinking and also teach the process of creative pro- 
blem solving as well as advanced research skills. Type III 
learning activities teach students skills which students can 
apply to classroom work as well as to their everyday lives. 

The resource instructors assist primary grade teachers 
and students by providing resource materials and by 
teaching specific skills to high ability students to differen- 
tiate the curriculum. 

At the junior high level the students are challenged to 
extend themselves academically and are encouraged to use 
their gifts and talents to reach complex levels of thinking, 
expression, and creativity while learning in a regular class- 
room environment. They are also given the opportunity 
to participate in the Talent Search Program offered by the 
Johns Hopkins University Center for the Academically 
Talented Youth (CTY). 



FROM THE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD OF ART 

Since last year's report the Art Department has ex- 
perienced a revitalization that is increasing student involve- 
ment in Art as well as improving the quality of curriculum 
and facilities. Groundwork is also being laid to increase 
the involvement of Art with the total learning environment 
of each school. 

At the Elementary Level: 

1 . All Elementary buildings now have one Art teacher 
who is there every day. 

2. By 1986, all schools should have an Art Room (to 
date, all but one do). 

3. Time has been provided for all Elementary Art 
teachers to meet weekly to share ideas, unify efforts 
and address curricular needs. 

4. Chelmsford has received a Cultural Arts Grant to ex- 
plore the cultural arts of Southeast Asia. 

At the Junior High: 

1 . The McCarthy School has been able to continue to 
provide an Art Room for each grade level, even with 
the addition of the sixth grade classes. 

2. There is a revitalization of the Art Club with special 
interest in murals. 

At the High School: 

1 . A substantial scholarship fund was given to the High 
School by the late Anthony Rebello for graduates 
continuing their education in Art. 

2. Additional Art studios have been constructed at the 
High School to be used to expand experiences in 
printmaking and sculpture. 

3. Reorganization of existing studio space will allow ex- 
pansion of ceramics, graphic and communicative art 
opportunities. 



Scholastic Art Awards Redults: 


1985 


1986 


Participating Students 


40 


55 


Portfolios Submitted 


6 


9 


Total Entries 


101 


126 


Honorable Mentions 


5 


6 


Gold Keys 


6 


11 


Blue Ribbons 


4 


? 



5. Honors and Advanced Placement Art Courses were 
added. 

Last year the Art Gallery in the Administrative wing of 
the Parker School was dedicated to the memory of former 
Art and Music Coordinator, Frank Page. Since then there 



63 



have been several notable exhibits in the Page Gallery, 

among them: 

The First Annual C.H.S. Alumni Art Show 
The First Annual Faculty and Staff Art Show 
The Town-wide Youth Art Month Show 

as well as individual school Art exhibits. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR BASIC SKILLS 

Chelmsford's system-wide Basic Skills Program provided 
the framework for curriculum design, staff development, 
competency testing and follow-up instructional programs 
in basic skills. A state mandate requires local districts to 
test for minimum competency at both elementary and sec- 
ondary levels. Chelmsford meet this requirement by testing 
for reading, writing, and mathematics in grades 3,5, and 
8 and for listening in grades 2, 4, and 7. A student who 
fails a test in grade 7 or 8 is required to take the test every 
year until he/she passes. The passing grade for competency 
tests in Chelmsford is higher than the passing grade in 85 
percent of the school districts in the state. 



FROM THE 
READING DEPARTMENT HEAD 

Chelmsford's reading program follows a curriculum bas- 
ed on a sequential skills program. The key words that 
describe the curriculum are consistency, continuity and ac- 
countability. 

The elementary teachers have formed a committee whose 
task it is to review the current basal readers and recom- 
mend for adoption materials suitable for the students in 
Chelmsford. 

The goal of the Reading Department is to have consis- 
tency—continuity within grade levels and in all of our 
elementary buildings in the reading area. 

The Metropolitan Reading Achievement Test was ad- 
ministered to all students grades one through six in Oc- 
tober. A post testing in April of all students one through 
six will provide information relative to the goal of accoun- 
tability. This testing program will be done on a yearly basis 
and will provide longitudinal information relative to the 
reading progress of each child in the school system. 

Once again in January the elementary students par- 
ticipated in the March of Dimes Reading Champions Pro- 
gram, a national program to raise money for elimination 
of birth defects. This program is endorsed by the Interna- 
tional Reading Association. 

The McCarthy School began preparations for a pleasure 
reading program for their students during the regular 
school day. In-service workshops were held during the fall 
and valuable information was given to the staff by Dr. 
Thomas Devine from the University of Lowell and Dr. 
David Monti, of Central Connecticut University. The 



students, faculty and staff at the McCarthy School will all 
read novels and other reading materials twice weekly dur- 
ing the school day. This program promotes achievement, 
attitudes and interests in reading, by providing time for 
students to enjoy reading, as a holistic and recreational ac- 
tivity. Sustained Silent Reading usually has a positive ef- 
fect on reading achievement scores. 

The secondary reading program consists of three levels 
— remedial, developmental, and enrichment. The courses 
meet the needs of the full range of student abilities. Each 
reading course is highly structured with required pre and 
post-testing, proven management techniques, and specific 
objectives. Student progress is monitored through in- 
dividual reading folders. Test results have shown that the 
secondary reading program has been extremely successful 
in helping students to overcome deficiencies in reading 
comprehension. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Department presently has eight staff 
members with expertise in a wide range of Business Educa- 
tion areas. In addition to the eight staff members, the 
department has a business resource specialist and a business 
resource aide for the business resource classroom. The 
funds for these two specialists and the business resource 
classroom was awarded to Chelmsford through a Federal 
Grant. The project for the Federal funds was written by 
members of the Business Education Department. This pro- 
ject was considered a model project for 1985-1986 by the 
granting agency. 

The Business Education Department has also added 
seventeen new IBM Wheelwriter Typewriters. These type- 
writers will be used to update the Business Education 
Department's equipment. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER I 

Title I of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Act 
(ESEA) was passed by the United States Congress to help 
local schools overcome educational deprivation. Under the 
law, the federal government appropriates money annually 
to school districts throughout the nation. The funds re- 
ceived by each community are determined by the 
government. 

Project proposals are written by the director, Beverly J. 
Hedison, and sent to the State Department of Education 
to be initiated in each area as a compensatory educational 
program. 

Chapter I has been part of the Chelmsford School System 
since 1975. The children are instructed in reading and 
mathematics at the Harrington School (grades 1-3), the 
Parker School (grades 4-6), and the Westlands school 
(grades 1-6). Westlands' students have the opportunity to 



64 



be part of the CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) Pro- 
gram. The use of this added tool of learning has proven 
to be very popular and has produced good results. 

A child's participation in this project does not mean that 
a student is not capable, but only that he/she is not, for 
one reason or another, working to his or her potential. In- 
struction in the past has proven beneficial in mathematics 
and reading, as well as in improving the child's self-image. 
With the combined efforts of the teaching staff, ad- 
ministration and interested parents, we are preparing the 
whole child for the future as well as the present. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

The Office of Community Education continues to ad- 
minister Adult Education programs at Chelmsford High 
School. Along with approximately 100 business, craft and 
special interest courses. Chelmsford High School is also an 
Extension Campus for Northeastern University, Middlesex 
Community College, and Lesley College. 

Childcare Programs run from 7:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 
for school age children at the Harrington School and 
enrollment has almost doubled during our second year. 
The Pre School program for 3 and 4 year olds continues 
to be successful and an outside play area has been installed. 

Summer School 1985 serviced almost 400 students in 
grades 2-12 and was the most comprehensive in the area. 

There has been a significant increase in the number of 
out of town students attending our schools with 34 students 
paying for seats. 

This year Community Education has taken over the 
scheduling of the use of school facilities and also incor- 
porated a part time Public Relations staff person. 

Perhaps the most exciting project this year has been the 
creation of the Chelmsford Education Foundation, a 
separate non-profit corporation established to raise funds 
to support education. Congressman Chester Atkins is chair- 
man of the Foundation and we are currently seeking ad- 
ditional board members. 

All programs and projects administered through Com- 
munity Education continue to be self supporting and a 
$25,000.00 surplus will be used to reduce the 1985-1986 
budget. 



Our attempt to create a section of Advanced Placement 
Physics fell by the wayside due to lack of enrollment. AP 
Biology and Chemistry continue to be popular with the 
students. 

During the past two years, we have made a serious at- 
tempt at keeping abreast of the changes in the scientific 
world. Mr. Donald Parkhurst and Mr. Jack Prescott par- 
ticipated in workshops at Boston University. The workshops 
were six days in length and were for the sole purpose of 
exposing selected, superior teachers to the changes in their 
subject areas, chemistry and biology, during the past few 
years. 

Mr. Ralph Sherwood spent a week of his summer vaca- 
tion, at his own expense, at the Boston Museum of Science 
updating himself in the area of chemistry and chemical 
education. He and Mr. Frank Turner continued this pro- 
gram during a weekend workshop this past October. 

Mr. Michael Tate spent two weeks at the Pfizer Research 
Center this past summer getting updated on the changes 
taking place in industry, and investigating possible rela- 
tionships between industry and education. 

The science department conducted its own four day 
workshop this past summer. The workshop was attended 
by Mr. Paul Murphy, Mr. Michael Denihan, Mr. Wayne 
Hamilton, and Mr. Bruce Ford. As a result of the work- 
shop, the Level III Physical Science Program has been 
revitalized and is now uniform. The teachers are en- 
thusiastically carrying out the activities planned during the 
summer. 

Mr. Michael Winn has been transferred to the high 
school from the junior high. He has given us a 100% ef- 
fort, quickly becoming a contributing member of the fac- 
ulty. He has also taken the opportunity to participate in 
a one day Biology workshop at Salem State College. 

There is one more teacher who I would like to single 
out. Mr. Gary Fadden was hired as a biology teacher, but 
a few years ago he was asked to pick up a couple of 
chemistry classes, which he did. Since that time he has 
taken several chemistry courses, has been certified to teach 
chemistry, and is now carrying a full load of chemistry 
classes — certainly a dedicated teacher. 

Over 70% of the science staff has participated in 
workshops over the past two years. Our goal is to have every 
member of the science staff participate in some sort of 
educational activity during the next school year. 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

Since our last report, we have had to add another sec- 
tion of Level II Physics. This course has expanded by one 
section each year since its inception three years ago. WE 
were about to drop it when, by student enrollment, it once 
again became a viable course. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS, GRADES 4-8 

During the past year, in the area of Language Arts, ef- 
forts have been made to standardize the program across 
grade levels so that youngsters in each elementary school 
will receive comparable Language Arts instruction. To this 
end, a common Language Arts series has been adopted 



65 



at all schools in grades one through six. Future plans call 
for the establishment of a core curriculum which will be 
covered in every classroom of a particular grade level. At- 
tached to this core curriculum will be pre and post testing 
as a means of measuring student progress and program 
effectiveness. 

In the coming year at the elementary level, we envision 
the adoption of the spelling series which accompanies the 
grammar texts. Some teachers have piloted the series and 
report success. The final decision will be made during the 
spring of 1986. 

In an effort to motivate writing, the literary magazine 
has been reactivated at levels four through eight. The 
targeted four editions per year should give young authors 
more immediate response to their work and will provide 
more frequent reinforcement for students' writings. Class- 
room teachers and/or teams of students select papers to 
represent specific classes: the works finally published are 
selected by the editors. An extra effort is being made to 
have published work representative of all ability levels since 
some of our slower students need the motivation as much 
or more than our brighter youngsters. Thus, publication 
in this magazine is within reach of all students grades four 
through eight. 

At grades seven and eight work continues on up-dating 
the various curricula and on establishing printed cur- 
riculum grades. The areas of spelling, vocabulary, and 
grammar are almost complete; the research paper and 
literature sections are in process. In addition, a vocabulary 
series has been piloted, adopted, and implemented for 
students at grades seven and eight. 

During the past summer, the department head and a 
select group of youngsters developed a Don't Panic booklet, 
a student-to-student handbook indicating how to survive 
the first few days of junior high. Students did the writing, 
selected the illustrations, did the typing, and even organiz- 
ed the lay-out. 

In addition, the English Department applied to the In- 
stitute for the Arts for a partial grant in order to present 
the Chamber Repertory Theater which performed "Leg- 
endy of Sleepy Hollow" for the students. In late winter, 
Poe's works will be presented by Chamber Repertory dur- 
ing school assemblies. The now annual peresentation is 
sponsored, for the most part, by proceeds from the stu- 
dent/faculty variety show. 



of computer software increases, the computer will become 
a greater tool in the development of problem solving skills. 
The goal of the seventh and eighth grade prorgram is to 
provide a smooth transition from the computation based 
courses of the elementary grades to the more abstract 
courses of the high school. One of the strongest features 
of our very strong mathematics curriculum is the job done 
by our junior high teachers. They work very hard to pro- 
vide the students with both the mathematics and study skills 
needed to be successful high school students. The high 
school program continues to provide one of the best 
mathematics educations that can be found in a public high 
school. Last year the mean math score on the SAT's was 
499 which is well above the nation average. The high school 
program is not only directed at the top students, but there 
is a strong commitment to provide all students with mean- 
ingful courses. The key to maintaining quality education 
is to constantly evaluate programs and goals. This is par- 
ticularly true this year in light of the new state education 
bill, Chapter 188. 

The mathematics program will be most effected by this 
new legislation which calls for testing of all 3rd, 8th and 
11th grades in reading, mathematics and sciences. This 
will not be a basic skills test but rather a test of specific 
content. Hopefully, the results of these tests will provide 
us with data that will help us continue to improve our cur- 
riculum. 

Another factor that has made this an interesting year 
is the transition of the McCarthy School from a junior high 
to a middle school. This change will not have a great ef- 
fect on the mathematics curriculum but it will require a 
change in our present computer program. At the present 
time there is much discussion as to what form the middle 
school computer program will take. The basic goal of the 
program will be to provide all students with an introduc- 
tion to how the computer can be used as a tool. This would 
include an introduction to programming, use of prepro- 
grammed software and possibly a little word processing. 
Another problem being examined is the effect declining 
enrollment will have on the high school curriculum in both 
mathematics and computer science. 

The 1986-87 school year will bring many new challenges. 
One only has to reflect on the fact that the students enter- 
ing kindergarten next fall will be in the class of 2000 — an 
acknowledgement to the rapid passage of time and the im- 
portance of planning in order to provide students with the 
skills they need in the twenty-first century. 



FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
MATHEMATICS/COMPUTER SCIENCE 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT HEAD 



This past year has been most interesting and has pro- 
vided many new challenges. The basic goal of the 
mathematics program continues to be to provide each stu- 
dent with the skills needed to become a productive member 
of our rapidly changing society. At the elementary level 
this is done by emphasizing basic computation skills and 
developing students' problem solving skills. As the quality 



The High School Mathematics program continues to 
meet the needs of all of our students and continues to res- 
pond to the challenging demands of our changing society. 
The curriculum includes topics ranging from Basic Skills 
Mathematics to Advanced Placement courses in Calculus, 
Advanced Calculus and Computer Programming. Chelms- 
ford High School students continue to perform well above 



66 



the national average in both the Mathematics portion of 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the Mathematics Achieve- 
ment Tests. The High School Mathematics Team is peren- 
nial champion of the Merrimack Valley Conference and 
is always one of the top three teams in the state. At a time 
when there is much national concern over the quality of 
mathematics instruction, Chelmsford High School is for- 
tunate to possess a highly motivated, well-qualified and 
diversified staff that averages over fifteen years of mathe- 
matics teaching experience. It is their constant outstanding 
effort tht will enable Chelmsford High School to continue 
to provide our students with the mathematical skills they 
will need in order for them to be successful in our increas- 
ingly technical world. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

This spring the Physical Education Department will 
begin the third phase of a project in the area of fitness 
which began in 1984 with McCarthy Junior High School's 
participation in the National Children and Youth Fitness 
Study. The purpose of the study conducted by the US Of- 
fice of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion was to 
formulate national norms for the Health Related Physical 
Fitness Test. 

Last year the Health Related Physical Fitness Test was 
introduced into all of our schools. The new test measures 
body composition, muscular strength and endurance, flex- 
ibility, and cardiovascular fitness. 

This year Chelmsford was accepted for participation in 
the FITNESSGRAM program. The FITNESSGRAM. 
developed by the Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas, 
is a computerized fitness report card system. The results 
of the individual tests (sit and reach, sit-up, skinfold, and 
walk/run) will be reported, compared to national norms, 
and, finally, an individual exercise prescription will be 
given based on the test results. 

Presently the townwide Physical Education staff is 
undergoing training in the mechanics of the testing and 
the computer aspects of the program in order to become 
certified FITNESSGRAM instructors. The results of our 
fitness testing will be reported to the Aerobics Institute to 
update the national test norms. 

Because of the numbers of students involved in Physical 
Education, the department will phase in the FITNESS- 
GRAM this spring by issuing report cards to the fourth, 
seventh, and ninth grade students. Although not all grade 
levels will receive FITNESSGRAMS, all test participants 
are eligible to qualify for the awards. 

Eventually additional grade levels will be phased into 
the FITNESSGRAM program. 

Our goals are threefold — to use the statistics of our 
testing program to improve the fitness of our students by 
addressing their needs; to report results to students as well 



as parents; and to work cooperatively with students and 
parents in providing the lifetime fitness skills required to 
promote good health. 



FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

The key to intelligence in today's world is not how much 
information you hold in your brain but your ability to 
locate the information you need from the countless, ever- 
growing sources of information modern technology pro- 
vides. Teaching students how to find pertinent informa- 
tion is the primary goal of the Chelmsford Public Schools' 
Instructional Media Department. This goal is accom- 
plished through a formal library skills curriculum in grades 
K through 6 and through informal instruction in grades 
7 through 12. At all grade levels the library curriculum 
is tied into the regular classroom curriculum. 

Ellen Mellen, the elementary librarian, guided the 5 
elementary schools through a smooth and eventful school 
year. The total book circulation for the 5 elementary 
schools was 89,549, up over 7,000 from last year in spite 
of a decrease in the student population. This averaged out 
to 35 books per student, with such heavy usage of library 
books, many of the books quickly become worn out or lost. 
While 1,050 elementary books were purchased this year, 
1,348 books were actually withdrawn from the shelves. 
Thus, the elementary libraries actually decreased their 
holdings. 

Some new developments included the establishment of 
a new link with the Chelmsford Public Library when Cheryl 
Zani, the children's librarian, visited 3 elementary schools 
to talk about the summer reading program with 4th, 5th, 
and 6th grade students. The Chelmsford Council of Schools 
funded a visit by storyteller Judith Black to each elemen- 
tary school which added a new dimension to the story hour 
experiences we provide regularly. Parent groups began the 
funding of extra library hours so that children could visit 
the library one day a week after school. The Parker Library 
was endowed with new carpeting (thanks to the P.T.O.) 
and a new location overlooking the courtyard. Book cir- 
culation has increased and everyone is pleased with the ar- 
rangement. 

At the McCarthy School, Virginia Stiles reports that the 
total book circulation topped the 15,000 mark at a whop- 
ping 15,301, despite the fact that the student population 
declined by 161 students over the previous year. This 
averaged out to 15 books per student per year. Although 
312 books and 280 paperbacks were purchased, 642 books 
were withdrawn because they were lost, worn out, or out- 
dated. Class visits to the library totalled 308. These visits 
were used primarily to select a book for a book report or 
to do research for a project. Research skills were taught 
or reviewed as needed on an individual or small group basis 
by the librarian. The annual book fair netted $396 for the 
library to purchase new paperbacks. Volunteers, 32 
students and 1 parent, also played a large part in keeping 
the two rooms of the library running by checking in 



67 



magazines, circulating books, writing overdue notices, fil- 
ing, and shelving paperbacks. 

The high school library continued to be heavily used by 
students during their free mods and by teachers bringing 
their classes for research. Renee Shapiro reports that the 
total circulation of books was 14,344 which averaged out 
to 7 books per student. While 793 new books were pur- 
chased, 629 books were withdrtawn due to wear, loss, and 
outdated information. Class visits totalled 600 for the year 
with a peak of 10 classes a day. Detailed subject guides 
to the reference collection and guides to periodical sources 
were distributed to teachers and students. Student assistants 
remained an active part of the library program. Experi- 
enced students helped man the circulation desk and pro- 
vided instruction in using microform readers, indexes, and 
periodical sources, while students new to the program 
helped with shelving, photocopying, and delivering of 
materials. 

The cataloging office had a busy year processing the 
2,155 books that were purchased for all of the school 
libraries and withdrawing 2,619 books. In addition, a 
catalog was prepared for teachers that lists all of the pro- 
grams the school department now has on video tape. And, 
as usual, one school library was inventoried. This year Har- 
rington got the nod. 

Although every school building has its own small col- 
lection of audio visual software, the bulk of the collection 
is distributed to the teachers from the central collection 
house in the Instructional Media Center. Over 2,900 items 
were used during the 1984-85 school year. These included 
16mm films, video tapes, sound filmstrips and more. The 
audio visual technician repaired close to 500 pieces of 
equipment and installed new VCR's and monitors in all 
seven schools. During the summer he inventoried and per- 
formed regular maintenance for over 1 ,600 pieces of equip- 
ment in all 7 schools. 

The graphic artist and his 29 career exploration students 
produced numerous graphics and audiovisual aids for 
teachers, administrators, Cable 43, the Chelmsford Rotary, 
Triangle Securities, and a host of dramatic and musical 
productions. These works included posters, signs, logo 
designs, flag designs, photographs, overhead transparen- 
cies, slide/tapes, and covers for programs and booklets. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Chelmsford High School, the eighth largest in the State, 
continued to function at a level of excellence with which 
the community has become familiar. The class of 1985 saw 
535 of its members receive diplomas and be awarded 
$52,625 in scholarships, exclusive of the estimated 
$750,000 awarded by the colleges and universities. 84% 
of the class went on to some type of further education. 

The Math Team extended its unparalleled streak of 
never having lost a league match. 



Resplendent in their new uniforms, the Band par- 
ticipated in an exchange with Maryvale High School of 
Cheektowaga, New York. The string section of the Or- 
chestra accompanied other schools on a performing tour 
of France. 

The Drama Club won the Regional Massachusetts High 
School Drama Festival and featured an outstanding pro- 
duction of Mousetrap, and with the Music Department en- 
thralled audiences with Peter Pan. The faculty continued 
to aid the scholarship fund by producing its tenth play, 
See How They Run. 

Culturally, the high school ranked among the best, and 
the Art Department's success was again demonstrated by 
several Globe Scholastic Art Awards and Gold Key Awards. 
Foreign exchanges continued to be popular and successful 
as we exchanged students with schools in Great Britain, 
Italy, and two in France. Individual students were hosted 
by Chelmsford from the Netherlands and Chile. We sent 
students to spend the summer in Argentina, Finland, In- 
donesia, Japan, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. The National 
Association of Secondary School Principals is producing 
a promotional film on school exchanges and selected 
Chelmsford High School as the model school for the film. 

The Dalton Trophy, donated by the Boston Globe, has 
become the symbol of excellence in Massachusetts high 
school sports. Chelmsford High School won the award for 
the third consecutive year thereby retiring a replica of the 
trophy. This was made possible by outstanding seasons by 
the Boys' Winter Track Team who won their second con- 
secutive State Championship and were undefeated Mer- 
rimack Valley Conference champs as were the Boys' and 
Girls' Swim Teams. The Girls' Winter Track Team won 
the State Relay Title and were undefeated Merrimack 
Valley champs. The Boys' Spring Track Team won the 
Eastern Massachusetts Championship and was runner-up 
in the All State Meet. The Girls' Volleyball Team was 
undefeated and won the State Championship. Boy's Volley- 
ball was introduced for the first time as a Varsity sport. 

An historic event occurred this fall as corporations and 
individuals got behind the project to light Alumni Stadium 
which led to the first home night football game played in 
the school's history. 

The students at Chelmsford High School continued their 
support of the American Red Cross by again donating over 
200 pints of blood. 

The Parents' Advisory Council continued its support of 
school activities by hosting the Annual Staff Appreciation 
Day and the successful After-Prom Breakfast. They also 
compile and distribute the Parents' Newsletter which con- 
tains important information for parents. 

Chelmsford High School's standards and accomplish- 
ments are recognized beyond the town line as there are 
presently 16 tuition-paying students attending the school. 



68 



Chelmsford High School continues to maintain its high 
level of achievement in academic, cultural, and athletic 
pursuits. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD OF MUSIC 

The Music Department strives to assist students in 
discovering and developing their musical talents for bet- 
ter understanding and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

The Harrington & Westlands Schools have two part-time 
music specialists, with all other elementary schools having 
one music specialist each, who is responsible for all music 
education in the building except for instruction on band 
and orchestral instruments. Each elementary school has 
weekly lessons in music with a multi-grade level perform- 
ing choral group of approximately 115 students. These 
schools have recorder consorts, and use of instruments in 
both classroom instruction and public performance. Some 
schools also have guitar clubs. 

General music at the McCarthy is given to all seventh 
and eighth grade students. General music in the seventh 
and eighth grade is basically designed for non-performing 
students; for many it is their last formal contact with music 
education. All McCarthy students have the opportunity to 
join one of the performing choral groups that rehearse after 
school on Tuesdays. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an experience 
not found in other areas within the Music Department. 
Instruction in playing orchestral string instruments is of- 
fered starting in grade three, and in all band and orchestral 
instruments from grades four through twelve. Each par- 
ticipating student is offered one small group lesson each 
week. In addition, there is the opportunity to participate 
in small group and larger ensembles during and after 
school. The Byam and South Row Schools have select 
bands that meet once each week after school. The 
"Elementary Select Orchestra" is made up of the more ad- 
vanced orchestra students from all five elementary schools. 
They rehearse after school on Wednesdays with the McCar- 
thy orchestra rehearsing after school on Thursdays. The 
High School Symphony Orchestra rehearses Monday even- 
ings. The High School Band rehearses Wednesday after 
school. There are approximately 850 students participating 
in the instrumental program. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles perform in school 
and community concerts and programs throughout the 
school year. Junior high and high school students perform 
in Northeast District and state festivals and competitions. 
Some of the community concerts include: McCarthy's 
elderly luncheon, tours of local nursing homes and Lowell 
General Hospital, Adams Library and "Downtown Cross- 
ing," Boston for WBZ radio. The High School Music 
Department presented "Peter Pan" as the annual musical 
this past May. 



The Chelmsford Friends of Music, a parental support 
group, has continued to show their ever-increasing sup- 
port to the total music department. Their private lesson 
program has increased to 150 participating students, and 
their scholarship program includes private lesson grants, 
summer camp and college scholarships. Students in all 
seven schools are eligible for these scholarships. 

Our plans for the future include developing the music 
program into a total "Performing Arts Department," which 
will include musical theatre drama and dance. We will also 
develop a "Gifted and Talented" program for our most 
promising young musicians. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD OF 
HOME ECONOMICS 

The Home Economics Department offers a wide range 
of courses which are designed to meet the needs and in- 
terests of the students for their present and future daily 
living needs. 

Home Economics begins at the 7th grade level with co- 
educational courses and continues with electives at the high 
school. New to the high school this year is our Parenting 
Resource Center funded through a federal grant and 
located in our Family living area. 

We are now working towards our goal of developing a 
course outline/curriculum for grade 6 students at McCar- 
thy for 1986-87 school year. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The 1985-86 school year was very successful for the In- 
dustrial Arts Department. The new Independent Living 
course was well received and hopefully will be expanded 
for 1986-87. New technology was added to the welding, 
drawing and electronic areas. The welding area added a 
T.I.G. (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding system. Electronics 
added more analog and digital training kits, and technical 
drawing upgraded its CAD (Computer Aided Design) 
system with an automatic dimensioning software package. 

The 1986-87 school year promises to be exciting as well. 
Hopefully we will be adding a graphic communication 
department to open a whole new area of exploration for 
our students. Graphics is the single largest employment op- 
portunity in New England and our students should be able 
to explore these opportunities. 

Once again, we had one of our outstanding Industrial 
Arts faculty members singled out for a state-wide honor. 
Mike Cerullo, teacher at McCarthy Middle School, was 
elected once again as state treasurer for the Massachusetts 
Industrial Educators Society (MIES). MIES is a state-wide 
organization of Industrial Arts teachers. I would like to 
congratulate Mike for this individual honor and thank the 



69 



rest of the staff for another year of outstanding effort. The 
staff members are: High School: Barry Bell, Paul Finnerty, 
Bernie DiNatale, Jim DeProfio; Middle School: Mike 
Cerullo, Paul Tagliamonte. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR SCIENCE, GRADES 4-8 

The major goal of the science curricula grades four 
through eight is to teach the students the skills of scien- 
tific investigation which involve not only measurement and 
lab techniques but also problem solving situations. To ac- 
complish this the elementary science program incorporates 
a body of factual knowledge along with scientific investiga- 
tion. The curricula content in each grade consists of units 
in the life, earth and physical sciences as well as lessons 
in health education. The junior high science program 
teaches life science in the seventh grade and earth science 
in the eighth grade with an increased emphasis on 
laboratory activities. This provides an extension of the 
elementary program and continues to produce an under- 
standing of the interdependence of the life, earth and 
physical sciences. 

The science staff has been extremely active this year in 
two areas. The top priority item has been safety particular- 
ly in regards to the proper use and storage of chemicals. 
Second, as a part of the continuous updating and revision 
of the science program, members of the department have 
been attending workshops, writing curricula, testing 
science software and implementing more basic skills and 
computers into the science classroom. 

The major goals for the department are to provide for 
a smooth incorporation of the sixth grade science program 
into a middle school environment, to keep abreast of in- 
novations in science curricula and to implement the NASA 
Seeds Project when it becomes available. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

The Social Studies Department at Chelmsford High 
School continues to meet its responsibility to develop in- 
formed citizens fully aware of the need to insure the dignity 
and worth of the individual, for personal involvement in 
improving the society they have inherited, and for recogniz- 
ing the interdependence of all people. These responsibilities 
are met through some twenty-four elective and required 
courses. These courses balance western and non-western 
content, history and the social sciences, year-long and 
semester courses, and skill and ability levels to meet in- 
dividual needs. 

In addition to class participation, students are encourag- 
ed to take part in a variety of enrichment programs. Dur- 
ing the past year, students have participated with 
distinction in History Day competition. The Harvard 



University Model United Nations, The Framingham State 
Essay Contest, The Century III Leadership Contest, The 
Boston Globe Stock Market Game, The Town of Chelms- 
ford Student Government Day, and Project Close-up. 

The teachers in the department are experienced, cer- 
tified specialists in their field. Most have their Masters' 
degrees or other high degrees. Many have helped to write 
the courses that they teach. A large number are active in 
regional and state social studies organizations or programs. 
They use a variety of materials and methods to bring a 
quality educational experience to their students. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Since September, 1984, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has implemented Chapter 766, The Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Special Education Law of 1972. In 
September 1978, P.L. 94-142, the Education of the Handi- 
capped Children Act became effective. Both laws entitle 
special needs students the right to a free and appropriate 
education. Students, ages three through twenty-one years, 
who have not received a high school diploma or its 
equivalent, and who have been determined by the Evalua- 
tion Team to have a special need, are eligible for special 
education services. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department began 
the September, 1985, school year with 660 students 
registered to receive special education services which is 11.7 
percent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

Chelmsford has a comprehensive program to serve the 
special needs children in our community. To develop and 
implement Individualized Educational Plans, Chelmsford 
employs a staff of specialists in learning disabilities, speech 
pathology, adaptive physical education, occupational 
therapy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, psycho- 
logical services, social services, and vocational services. For 
students who require more comprehensive educational pro- 
grams, there are twelve resource classes staffed by special 
education teachers who are assisted by instructional aides. 
Private day and residential schools provide for students 
with severe learning and/or emotional needs. 

The Special Education Department has begun to place 
computers in its programs for student and teacher use. It 
is anticipated that all special education personnel will have 
access to computers for their programs. 

The Special Education Department has completed a 
program evaluation of the overall department. This report 
is on file for review at the Special Education Office. 

For the 1985-1986 school year the Special Education 
Department has written an Early Childhood Grant to ex- 
pand its services for children ages 3-4. This grant will assist 
in broadening the outreach program already in place, as 
well as providing further training of staff in assessment and 
program delivery. 



70 



The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost-efficient programs for children with low- 
incidence disabilities. Classes, held in Dracut and 
Tewksbury, service the needs of children from Chelmsford, 
Billerica, Dracut, Tewksbury and Westford. 

For the current school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of SI, 909, 472. In ad- 
dition, the town will receive 5220,276 from the federal 
government for education and vocational programs. 

The Special Education Departments, along with the 
Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, continues to 
provide pre-vocational and vocational programs through 
the Center for Occupational Awareness and Placement 
(Project CO. A. P.). As a result, many students have been 
successfull placed in field training sites and subsequently 
enter into full-time employment. 

In commemoration of Chapter 766's Tenth Anniversary 
the Special Education Department produced a video tape 
describing all special needs services in Chelmsford. This 
video was shown on Cable TV Channel 43 for the com- 
munity and previewed by selected audiences. This Tape 
is available for viewing at the Special Education Office. 

The Special Needs Service Booklet, describing the 
Chapter 766 process and services for parents, students, and 
community members, is available at the McKay and 
Adams libraries and at the Special Education Office. 



IN CONCLUSION: 

The new year will again bring new challenges and new 
problems. As we carry out our plans for 1986-87 and look 
ahead to future means of supporting town efforts, we will 
need to think more and more of cooperative means for 
achieving our economical and educational goals. Examples 
of these cooperative efforts are partnerships, foundations, 
community education, and area wide cooperation to 
resolve Route 3 transportation problems. 

The School Committee has once more attempted to 
match town need with sufficient funding in order to main- 
tain an envied educational program. Our students and staff 
will not only continue in their "Quest for Quality" but, 
in fact, achieve it. The School Department budget effec- 
tively implemented will greatly aid in this quest. Sincere 
thanks once again are extended to the town officials and 
boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent Teacher 
Organizations, school volunteer workers, and to the citizens 
for their cooperation and assistance this past year. 



The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation to the following staff members for their years 
of loyal and meritorious service, and who have retired this 
past year. 



Roger Q. Smyth 

Christos Tournas 

Betsey Bohl 

Ada (Terrey) Dumont 

Gertrude Gorman 

Agnes Farrington 
Theresa Gauthier 
Mary Germann 

John Blake 

Albert Marchand 

Roderick Richard 
Aniello Gagliardi 
Nellie Dirubbo 

Helen Visniewski 

Frances Williams 

Robert Williams 

Milton Kinney 

Russell Smith 



Asst. Supt. for Curriculum 
and Instruction 
Building Master, McCarthy 
Jr. High School 
Program Supervisor, Instruc- 
tional Media 

Administrative Assistant to 
Asst. Supt. for Personnel 
Receptionist, Central Ad- 
ministration Office 
Teacher Aide, Parker School 
Teacher Aide, Parker School 
Teacher Aide, Harrington 
School 

Head Custodian, Chelmsford 
High School 

Custodian, Chelmsford High 
School 

Custodian, South Row School 
Custodian, South Row School 
School Food Service, 
Chelmsford High School 
School Food Service, Byam 
School 

School Food Service, 
Chelmsford High School 
Security Guard, Chelmsford 
High School 

Watchman/ Maintenance 
Dept. 

Custodian, Harrington School 
(retired and now deceased) 



The community and the school department were grieved 
by the deaths of the principal of the Byam School, the 
budget and accounts coordinator for the Chelmsford 
Public School System, and two elementary teachers of the 
Byam School. These fine people were loved and respected 
by everyone. They will long be remembered for their 
dedicated service to the school system and their devotion 
to the children of the town of Chelmsford. 

IN MEMORIAM 

Mr. Daniel F. Horgan, Principal, Byam School 
Mrs. Claire Sanderson, Budget and Accounts Coor- 
dinator 
Mrs. Phyllis Szidat, Grade 4 Teacher, Byam School 
Mrs. Bette Turrentine, Grade 3 Teacher, Byam School 

Submitted by: Alan Bradshaw 
Superintendent of Schools 



71 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT TESTING RESULTS 

(May 1985) 

Scores are reported on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being 
the highest. College credit is usually granted for 3,4, and 
5; occasionally 2's receive limited recognition. 



Chelmsford High Scores: 
Subject 

American History 


Score Range 
Low High 
12 3 4 5 

2 3 1 


6/6 


% 
100% 


7 


86% 


Art — Studio 














1 


1/1 


100% 


A/P course 
not offered 


Biology 





1 


2 


5 


3 


10/11 


75% 


20 


55% 


Chemistry 








3 


5 


2 


10/10 


100% 


23 


43% 


Computer Science 





2 


2 


1 


7 


10/12 


83% 


22 


55% 


English Comp & Lit 





2 


8 


5 


3 


16/18 


89% 


32 


56% 


European History 








3 


4 





7/7 


100% 


6 


86% 


French Lang. 





1 


4 


4 


1 


9/10 


90% 


13 


77% 


Math — Calculus AB 


3 


2 


3 


10 


6 


19/24 


79% 


57 


42% 


Math -Calculus BC 


2 





4 


1 


4 


9/11 


83% 


17 


65% 


Physics B 








1 








1/1 


100% 


A/P course 
not offered 


Spanish Lang. 








3 


1 





4/4 


100% 


9 


44% 


TOTAL 


5 


8 


35 


39 


28 


102/115 


89% 


206 


56% 



College Credit possible in 102 out of 115 or 89%. 
56% of all Advanced Placement students took the exam. 



1979 

CHS Seniors 

Metro Boston HS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 

1980 

CHS Seniors 

Metro Boston HS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 

1981 

CHS Seniors 

Metro Boston HS Seniors 

Mass. HS Seniors 

New England Seniors 

Nationwide Seniors 

1982 

CHS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 

1983 

CHS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 

1984 

CHS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 



436 


483 


487 


At CHS 


431 


468 


33.145 


83% 


428 


463 


57,450 


took it 


431 


465 


117.479 




427 


467 


991.617 




445 


494 


485 


AT CHS 


427 


471 


33,284 


71% 


423 


464 


57,608 


took it 


426 


466 


116,581 




424 


466 


991,245 




426 


476 


530 




— not 


available — 






422 


462 


58,036 




425 


463 


118,157 




424 


466 


994,046 




443( + 17) 


490( + 14) 


505 




425 


463 


55,435 




428 


464 


115,794 




426 


467 


988.680 




435(-8) 


484(-6) 


505 




427 


463 


54.310 




430 


465 


111,494 




425 


468 


962,877 




440( + 5) 


492( + 8) 


480 




429 


467 


52,534 




432 


468 


108,698 




426 


471 


964,739 





1985 

CHS Seniors 
Mass. HS Seniors 
New England Seniors 
Nationwide Seniors 



448( + 8) 499(+7) 453 AT CHS 

434 472 51,702 86% 

436 473 107,420 took it 

431 475 977,361 



College credit 
possible 



Number in 
class 



taking exam 



COLLEGE BOARD 

S.A.T. MEANS OVER THE LAST 10 YEARS 



ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC 

SECONDARY STUDENTS 

CHELMSFORD HIGH & NASHOBA TECH. 





Total Post- 


Total 


(Employment, 




Secondary 


Others 


military, etc.) 


Chelmsford High Seniors 


441 


85 


526 


Nashoba Tech. (Chelmsford Srs.) 


10 


40 


50 




451 


125 


576 


PERCENTAGES 








Chelmsford High Seniors 


83.8% 


16.2% 




Nashoba Tech. (Chelmsford Srs.) 


20% 


78% 





COMBINED 78.3% 



1976 

CHS Seniors 

Greater Boston HS Seniors 

Mass. HS Seniors 

New England Seniors 

Nationwide Seniors 

1977 

CHS Seniors 

Greater Boston HS Seniors 

Mass. HS Seniors 

New England Seniors 

Nationwide Seniors 

1978 

CHS Seniors 

Metro Boston HS Seniors 

Mass. HS Seniors 

New England Seniors 

Nationwide Seniors 



432 


478 


481 


433 


470 


35,081 


432 


469 


57,892 


435 


472 


117.163 


431 


472 


999.829 


435 


476 


461 


432 


469 


34.195 


429 


465 


38,060 


432 


468 


116.185 


429 


470 


979,344 


439 


487 


523 


434 


470 


33,819 


430 


465 


57.827 


433 


468 


115,671 


429 


468 


989,185 



DROP OUT REPORT 


—JUNE 


1985 






Class of 1985 Boys 
Class of 1985 Girls 


257 
293 

550 


8 
5 

13 


DO 
DO. 

DO. 


= 


249 
288 

537 


= 


3.1% 
1.7 

2.3 


Class of 1986 Boys 
Class of 1986 Girls 


270 
273 

543 


6 
12 

18 


DO 
DO. 

DO. 


: 


264 
261 

525 


: 


2.2 
4.3 

3.3 


Class of 1987 Boys 
Class of 1987 Girls 


304 
304 

608 


5 
10 

15 


DO. 
DO. 

DO. 


= 


299 
294 

593 


: 


1.6 
3.2 

2.4 


Class of 1988 Boys 
Class of 1988 Girls 


266 
281 


3 
5 


DO. 
DO. 


= 


263 
276 


= 


1.1 
1.7 




547 


8 


DO. 


= 


539 


= 


1.4 


TOTAL STUDENTS 


2248 


54 


D.O. 


= 


2194 


= 


2.4 



72 



Class of 1985 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 


Boys 

3 
4 

1 


Girls 

5 






8 


5 


= 13 


Class of 1986 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 
Military 


2 

1 
1 
2 

6 


1 
8 
3 

12 


= 18 


Class of 1987 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 


1 
4 

5 


2 
6 
2 

10 


= 15 


Class of 1 988 — Employment 
Voluntary 
Requested to Leave 


3 
3 


1 
2 
2 

5 


= 8 
54 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF GUIDANCE 

Following are pertinent facts and figures for the Class 
of 1985; also are Chelmsford High School and Nashoba 
Tech statistics for an overview of Chelmsford public school 
graduates: 



Number of Graduates 
Four-year colleges 
Two-year colleges 
Other Post-secondary 
Total Post-secondary 
Employment 
Military 
Undecided 
A.F.S. 



1981 




1982 




1983 




1984 




1985 




647 




611 




620 




560 




526 




391 


60% 


379 


62% 


384 


62% 


370 


66% 


369 


70% 


83 


13% 


89 


15% 


77 


13% 


61 


11% 


60 


11% 


16 


3% 


17 


3% 


20 


3% 


18 


3% 


12 


2% 


490 


76% 


485 


80% 


481 


78% 


449 


80% 


441 


84% 


146 


22% 


102 


16% 


105 


16% 


95 


17% 


85 


16% 


2 




12 


2% 


9 


2% 


6 


1% 


6 


1% 


9 


2% 


10 


2% 


23 


4% 


6 
4 


1% 
1% 


1 

1 





Highlights: 

Eighty-four percent of the graduates will continue their 
education. This is the second consecutive appreciable in- 
crease: Since 1980 we have gone from 71% to 84% -a 13% 
increase! 

Seventy percent will enter 4 year schools — 7 out of 10, 
another big increase. 

The top three students plan to attend Dartmouth. All 
were accepted as Early Decision candidates. 

Only 1 student said undecided about future plans! 

Aside from University of Lowell (69) and University of 
Massachusetts (40), other popular schools were: Tufts, Cor- 
nell, University of Vermont, Providence, Northeastern, Ho- 
ly Cross, Colby, University of New Hampshire, University 
of Maine, Boston University, Rensselaer Poly Tech, Fitch - 
burg State and Worcester State. 

Of the top 20% of graduates (106), 105 will enter col 
lege in September! 



Following is a summary of career choices: 



264 



149 



32 
15 



60 

1 



526 



The Professional Field, Medicine, Law, 

Teaching, Engineering, Etc. 

Managers, Proprietors and Officials 

Manage a business, own your own 

business, etc. 

Clerical, Secretarial, Office Work 

Skilled Worker — Craftsman 

A foreman with a trade 

Semi-skilled Worker 

Truck Driver, Factory Worker 

Unskilled Worker 

Construction 

Other not listed 

A.F.S. 



The drop out rate continues to lower. 

One hundred and two out of the 115 Advanced Place- 
ment exams written received "3" or better. This is 89%, 
well above the national average. 



73 



The breakdown was: 



35 


3's 


39 


4's 


28 


perfect 5's 



102 



1976 transcripts were processed for the graduating class; 
538 for past graduates for a total of 2,514. 

Over 600 students were placed in part-time work through 
the job-matching program. The job market continues to 
be good. Many of the graduates moved right into full-time 
employment after graduation. 

TOP 10% OF THE CLASS OF 1985 



1. Dartmouth 

2. Dartmouth 

3. Dartmouth 

4. Cornell 

5. Rensselaer Poly Tech 

6. Cornell 

7. Rensselaer Poly Tech 

8. Tufts 

9. Cornell 

10. College of The Holy Cross 

11. Boston College 

12. Duke 

13. University of Mass. 

14. M.I.T. 

15. Rensselaer Poly Tech 

16. Cornell 

17. College of The Holy Cross 

18. Brown 

19. College of The Holy Cross 

20. Tufts 

21. Tufts 

22. Colby 

23. College of The Holy Cross 

24. University of Vermont 

25. University of Mass. 

26. Rensselaer Poly Tech 

27. Drew 

28. Emory 

29. Southeastern Mass. University 

30. College of The Holy Cross 

31. Trinity 

32. Middlebury 

33. U.S. Military Academy 

34. Hamilton 

35. College of The Holy Cross 

36. Boston College 

37. Northeastern 

38. Boston University 

39. Clarkson 

40. College of The Holy Cross 

41. Rensselaer Poly Tech 

42. Colorado College 

43. Clark University 

44. Middlebury 

45. University of Vermont 

46. Northeastern 

47. Providence College 

48. University of Florida 

49. Evangel 

50. Worcester State 

51. University of Miami 

52. University of Lowell 

53. University of Pennsylvania 

54. Boston University 

55. University of Lowell 



Math/Computer Science 

Engineering 

Computer Science 

Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering 

Computer Science 

International Relations 

Bilology 

Chemistry 

Political Science 

Engineering 

Pre-Med 

Ocean Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Hotel Administration 

Liberal Arts 

English 

Pre-Med 

Pre-Med 

Biology 

Political Science 

Undeclared 

Animal Science 

Engineering 

Engineering 

Biology 

Biology 

Const. Engineering 

Undeclared 

Undeclared 

French 

Economics 

P re-Law 

Business 

Electrical Engineering 

Accounting 

Engineering 

Economics 

Computer Engineering 

Undeclared 

Business 

Liberal Arts 

Psychology 

Liberal Arts 

Business 

Art 

Undeclared 

Engineering 

Pre-Med 

Business 

Liberal Arts 

Aerospace Engineering 

Business 



TOP 10% COLLEGE CHOICE SUMMARY 

Boston College 2 

Boston University 2 

Brown 1 

Clark University 1 

Clarkson 1 

Colby 1 

Colorado College 1 

Cornell 4 

Dartmouth 3 

Drew 1 

Duke 1 

Emory 1 

Evangel 1 

Holy Cross, College of 7 

Hamilton 1 

M.I.T. 1 

Middlebury 2 

Northeastern 2 

Providence College 1 

Rensselaer Poly Tech 5 

Southeastern Mass. University 1 

Trinity 1 

Tufts 3 

U.S. Military Academy 1 

University of Florida 1 

University of Lowell 2 

University of Massachusetts 2 

University of Miami 1 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

University of Vermont 2 

Worcester State 1 



TOP 10% SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS 

Accounting 1 

Animal Science 1 

Art 1 

Biology 4 

Business Administration 5 

Chemistry 1 

Computer Science 2 

Economics 2 

Engineering 9 

Aero 1 

Chemical 1 

Computer 1 

Electrical 2 

Ocean 1 

English 1 

French 1 

Hotel Management 1 

International Relations 1 

Liberal Arts 4 

Math 1 

Political Science 2 

Psychology 1 

Pre- Law 1 

Pre-Med 4 

Undeclared 5 



74 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 

The following is the Annual Report for the Chelmsford 
Sewer Commission for the Year 1985. 

The Chelmsford Sewer Commission was notified on June 
12, 1985 that the State design funding was in place. The 
Inter-Municipal Agreement between the City of Lowell and 
the Town of Chelmsford was signed in the Summer of 1985. 
1985 has done away with all scepticism concerning the sew- 
age program in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The design of the Phase 1-A Sewer Program is nearing 
completion. Design plans and specifications for the North 
Chelmsford Sewer Project will be submitted to the State 
DEQE-Division of Water Pollution Control in February, 
1986. Once these plans are approved, and the Town of 
Chelmsford acquires the necessary land and rights-of-way, 
the project will be put out to bid. The North Chelmsford 
project will include five (5) construction contracts. The 
completion of the North Chelmsford Sewer Project should 
correspond with the completion of the Southbank Intercep- 
tor Sewer in Lowell. That interceptor sewer is needed to 
accommodate flows from North Chelmsford. Construction 
will start on the North Chelmsford Project in June, 1986. 

The design of the Chelmsford Center Sewer Project is 
ongoing and should be completed in the summer of 1986. 
The final routing of the sewer pipeline into Lowell has fin- 
ally been approved by the City of Lowell. The approved 
route was originally proposed by the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission and Weston & Sampson Engineers, but was 
rejected by the City of Lowell. Lowell and its engineers were 
concerned about the adequacy of the City's sewer system 
to accept flows from Chelmsford Center. 

The persistence of the Chelmsford Sewer Commission 
in favor of an interceptor sewer route along the Lowell Con- 
nector, as opposed to a lengthy (and costly) route along 
Stedman Street to the Southwest Bank Interceptor Sewer 
recently paid off. As a result of Weston & Sampson's studies 
(as requested by the Sewer Commission), the City has re- 
tracted its earlier criticism of the preferred route. 

The routing of the interceptor along the Lowell Con- 
nector will ultimately result in $1.3 million in construction 
costs savings and approximately $30,000 per year in opera- 
tion and maintenance costs. 



On October 23, 1985 Governor Michael Dukakis signed 
Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1985 creating the Chelmsford 
Center Industrial Sewer District Commission. This will 
enable the Industrial District to go forward with their 
sewerage plans at no cost to the Chelmsford residents as 
promised by the Chelmsford Sewer Commission. The Board 
of Selectmen appointed the District Commissioners. The 
formation of the District will ultimately increase the State 
grant funding that the Town (and the District) can receive 
for sewer construction. District officials are now resolving 
several issues regarding system financing with their legal, 
fiscal and technical consultants. 

With the recent signing of Senate Bill 2610 by Governor 
Michael Dukakis, the amount of grant funding the Town 
will receive for sewer construction will obviously increase. 
In addition, Chelmsford can virtually be assured that given 
the State-wide priority of the proposed sewer projects, State 
(and Federal) funding will be received. 

The increase in available monies for pollution control 
projects could also result in construction of sewers to serve 
the next phase of the program earlier than originally an- 
ticipated. 

The Sewer Commission now has an office in the Town 
Offices, and has a full-time Principal Clerk, Evelyn L. 
Newman. In Fiscal Year 87 the Commission will be hiring 
a full-time Superintendent for day-to-day management of 
the sewer system operations. A sewer user charge system 
will also be implemented and the Sewer Commission is 
preparing to add equipment and personnel for such billing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chelmsford Sewer Commission 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Jean R. Organ, Vice Chairman 

Barry B. Balan, Clerk 



75 



OFFICE OF 
THE TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

DEFT. MEMBERS: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Florence Ramsay, Asst. Treasurer 
Margaret Mullen, Asst. Tax Collector 
Lorraine Parkhurst, Payroll Co-ordinator 
Lois Conlon, Data Processing Clerk 
Donna Rogers, Junior Clerk 
Robert Doukszewicz, Junior Clerk 
Judith Olsson, Part-time, tex cert, clerk 
Donna Main, Part-time, back accts. clerk 



Sales of lands taken by the Town for non-payment of 
back taxes will continue to be done with most of the land 
taken being sold through the Board of Selectmen's Office. 
We will continue to notify abutters of these lands as they 
come into our possession in efforts to get the lots back on- 
to the tax rolls as soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James R. Doukszewicz, 
Treasurer/Tax Collector 



Balance as of July 1, 1984 ? 5,624.732.00 

Receipts through June 30. 1985 53,009.021.26 

Paid out on warrants (53.711.668.61) 

Balance as of June 30. 1985 $ 4,922,084.65 

Breakdown of June 30, 1985 Fund Balance: 

Cash in banks' $ 4.035,894.45 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 393.675.92 

Non-Revenue Funds** 492,514.28 

TOTAL % 4,922.084.65 

•invested funds in money market accts. included here 
••these funds are the unexpended proceeds from prior bond issues. 



This year was an audit year with the Dept. of Revenue 
and we are anticipating a very favorable management 
report as the staff has worked hard to further implement 
an aggressive tax collection program which has cleared all 
back levies through fiscal year 1983. License suspension 
hearings continue to bring the excise collection rate up to 
a very high percentage. Tax-title proceedings on real estate 
accounts in arrears has brought significant revenue into 
the Treasury on a schedule that has enhanced our cash flow 
situation and has enabled us to reduce our time for which 
temporary loans must be left outstanding. 

Preparations for the bond sales of the School Capital Im- 
provements Project and the Sewer Design project are well 
advanced with the sales expected to occur in February and 
August of 1986 respectively. 

We hope to further clear the tax levies for fiscal year 
1983, and expect that this will be accomplished before the 
close of fiscal 1986, which occurs on June 30, 1986. Efforts 
to clear the fiscal 1984 tax levies will be started and should 
be concluded within the calendar year of 1986, or by the 
end of the first-half of fiscal year 1987. 

New tax-title procedures for unpaid fiscal 1984 and fiscal 
1985 real estate taxes will be undertaken in the spring of 
1986. The revenues from this advertising and liening pro- 
cess should be realized before the end of calendar year 1986. 



76 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 



Ernest F. Day 



Term Expires 1987 



Board of Selectmen Executive Secretary 

Howard W. Redfem, Jr. Term Expires 1986 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington, Esquire Term Expires 1986 

Police Chief 
Raymond P. McKeon Term Expires 1986 

Deputy Police Chiefs 

Pennryn D. Fitts James C. Greska 

Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 

James A. Sousa 

Cemetery Superintendent 
George E. Baxendale Term Expires 1986 

Park Superintendent 
Donald P. Gray Term Expires 1986 

Director of Public Health 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1986 

Assistant Director of Public Health 
John R Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1986 

Board of Health Physician 
Michael J. Dean, M.D. Term Expires 1986 

Town Engineer 

James E. Pearson Term Expires 1986 

Superintendent of Streets 
Harold E. Gray Term Expires 1986 

Inspector of Animals 
Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term Expires 1986 

Building Inspector 
Ronald W. Wetmore Term Expires 1986 

Local Inspector 

Bruce H. Clark Term Expires 1986 

Wiring Inspector 
Francis E. Cunningham Term Expires 1986 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term Expires 1986 



Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd Term Expires 1986 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Anthony C. Ferreira Term Expires 1986 

Town Aide and Council on Aging 
Kathleen M. Robinson Term Expires 1986 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Elizabeth L. Delaney 

Assistant Treasurer 
Florence Ramsay 

Assistant Accountant 

Mary Villare 

Board of Selectmen Administrative Assistant 
Judith E. Carter 

Board of Selectmen's Clerk 
Beth A. Gibbs 

Planning Board Clerk 
Christine Gleason 

Board of Appeals Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Sharon Galpin 

Personnel Board Clerk 
Cable TV Clerk 

Elizabeth Kopicko 

Insect Pest Control Officer 
Richard J. Day 

Superintendent of Public Buildings 

William W. Edge 

Veterans' Graves Officer 
George E. Baxendale 

Veteran's Agent 
Mary K. McAuliffe 

Dog Officer 
William Shedd 

Part-time Dog Officer 

Karen Piero 

Highway Department Foremen 

Pearl Koulas Arthur Deschaine Frederick Greenwood 



77 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1985 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Warrants Payable 



ASSETS 



Cash: 
General: 

In Banks 
Interest Bearing 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Interest Bearing 

Non-Revenue: 

Interest Bearing 

Due from Stabilization Fund 

Due from Cemetery Trust Fund 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes: 



S 842,890 
3,193.005 



393.676 



492,514 



Real Estate 1985 


542,246 




Real Estate 1984 


69.723 




Real Estate 1983 


17,447 




Personal Property 1985 


27,975 




Personal Property 1984 


11.058 




Personal Property 1983 


10.029 




Personal Property 1982 


2.155 




Personal Property 1981 


3.540 




And Prior Years 




684,173 


Motor Vehicle Excise 1985 


159.098 




Motor Vehicle Excise 1984 


29.507 




Motor Vehicle Excise 1983 


24.021 




Motor Vehicle Excise 1982 


20.045 




Motor Vehicle Excise 1981 


17.131 




And Prior Years 




249,802 


Farm Animal Excise 1985 




63 


Tax Titles 


178.215 




Tax Possessions 


21.602 


199.817 


Water Liens 1984 


106 




Water Liens 1985 


1.437 


1.543 


Departmental: 






Off Duty Work Details 


12.017 




Public Buildings (Rent) 


272 




Cemetery 


9.140 


21.429 


State Aid to Highways 




271,101 


Loans Authorized: 






Sewer Construction 


9.915.000 




School Building Improvements 


1,080,300 


10.995,300 



Transfers Authorized From: 
Federal Revenue Sharing 

Overdrawn Appropriation: 
Snow and Ice Removal 

Overdrawn Overlay Accounts: 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1983 

Underestimated Assessments: 
Special Education 
Regional Transit 

Revenue: 

Appropriations Voted for Fiscal Year 1986 

TOTALS 



908,554 



50.123 



Notes Payable: 

Reimbursement Anticipation 
Bond Anticipation 

Payroll Deductions 

Guarantee Deposits 

Tailings— Unclaimed Checks 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Sale of Real Estate 





Agency: 


$4,922,085 


Dog License Fees 


799,110 


Gifts from Individuals: 




Council on Aging 


15,000 


Cemetery 




Library 




Recreation 




Health 



Federal and State Grants: 
Revenue Sharing 
Department of HUD 
Dept. of Community Affairs 
Dept. of Elder Affairs 
Dept. of Public Works 
Secretary of State 
Mass. Budget Bureau 
Public Law 874 
Other School Grants 

Revolving Funds: 
School 
Recreation 
Cultural Council 
Outside Detail 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Reserve Fund — Overlay Surplus 

Overlay Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 
Levy of 1981 
Levy of 1982 
Levy of 1984 
Levy of 1985 

Appropriation Balances Forward 

Construction Account: 

School Building Improvements 
Sewer Plans and Design 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Animal Excise 
Tax Titles & Possessions 
Water Liens 
Departmental 
Aid to Highways 



1,156 




Overestimated Assessments: 


4,368 
13,966 


19.490 


County Tax 
County Hospital 
State Parks 


3.568 

13.448 


17.016 


Surplus Revenue: 
Restricted 
Unrestricted 




31.333.562 


Appropriations Voted from Rev< 




550.488,168 


Appropriation Control FY 1986 






Revenue 






Trasnfers 






TOTALS 



74.773 
400.000 



$328,435 

474,773 
345.405 
4.953 
10,774 
18.767 
32,767 

926 



896 




250 




3,804 




1,092 




68 


6,110 


393,676 




4,177 




5,000 




4,229 




205.476 




23,381 




2,927 




21,029 




41,958 


701,853 


151,232 




2,728 




3,996 




2,508 


160,464 




10,595,300 




16,454 


8,672 




21,354 




6.723 




14,975 




86.825 




202,153 


340.702 




1.158.349 


299.571 




192,943 


492,514 


249,802 




63 




199,817 




1,543 




21,429 




196.328 


668.982 


14,425 




356 




7 


14,788 


1,100.000 




1,377,219 


2,477,219 




908,554 


31,333,562 




396,517 


31,730,079 




J50,488,168 



78 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit: 

General: $848,965 

Outside Debt Limit: 

General: 880,000 



$1,728,965 

Short Term Note: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General: 

Schools $848,965 

Serial Loans: 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General: 

Schools 880,000 

$1,728,965 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Treasurer $1,763,489 

In Custory of Library Trustees 107, S3S 

In Custody of Selectmen 797 

In Custody of Veterans Emergency Fund Committee 10.814 







$1,882,433 


In Custody of Treasurer: 




Geo. W. Barris-Varney Playground 


$4,489 




Conservation Fund 


60.182 




Wright Reservation 


3.187 




Stabilization Fund 


1.176.181 




Insurance Sinking Gund 


61.283 




Cemetery Funds: 






Geo W. Barris Memorial 


8.963 




Perpetual Care 


420.136 




Adam Emerson 


1.039 




Christopher Roby 


14.033 




Vilcata S. Douglas 


12.881 




Baptist Pond Cemetery 


1.115 


1.763.489 


In Custody of Library Trustees: 






Amos F. Adams 


30.064 




Geo. W. Barns 


539 




Frances Clark 


7.858 




Clement Fund 


25.278 




Albert H. Davis 


1.170 




Frederick B. Edwards 


5.706 




Nathan B. Edwards 


1.179 




Victor E. Edwards 


1.941 




Adam Emerson 


238 




Ora Flint 


5.553 




George Memorial 


2.999 




Thomas P. Proctor 


17.506 




Serlina Richardson 


636 




Joseph E. Warren 


271 




Gertrude Wright 


3.645 




Aaron George — Cemetery Fund 


2.750 


107.333 


In Custody of Selectmen: 






Emma Gay-Varney Playground 


797 




In Custody of Veterans 






Emergency Fund Committee: 






Veterans Emergency Fund 


10.814 


$1,882,433 









79 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 
SEC. 4-E CHAPTER 40 GENERAL LAWS 



Cash — In Custody of Treasurer 



Unexpended Balance 



$800 



$800 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond — Note Issue 

Westland-Harrington Schools 

Byam School 

School Building Capital Improvement #4 

School Building Capital Improvement #5 

School Computer Purchase 

TOTALS 



Interest 
Rate 
4.30 
6.00 

5.16 
6.9S 
6.75 



Outstanding 
6-30-84 
540.000 
605.000 
293,037 



1.438.037 



Payments 


Outstanding 


1985 


6-30-85 


160.000 


380.000 


105,000 


500,000 


293,037 








715.000 





133,965 


558,037 


1,728,965 



Principal 


Interest 


Due 1986 


Due 1986 


155,000 


16,340 


100,000 


27,000 








715.000 


49,560 


133,965 


7,436 


1.103,965 


100,336 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING 

Fiscal Year 1985 



Cash Balance July 1, 1984 
Plus Receipts: 

Entitlements Received 
Interest Earned 

Less Authorized Appropriations: 
Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 

Recreation — Southwell Field 
Highway — Sidewalks 

Cash Balance June 30, 1985 



585,633 
24.477 



240,000 

240.000 

11,445 

16,413 



CHANGES IN SURPLUS REVENUE 



Balance June 30, 1985 

Surplus Revenue— Restricted 

Surplus Revenue — Unrestricted 



DISBURSEMENTS 



1984 



General Government: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
Registrars 

Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Commission 
Constable 

Council on Aging/Town Aide 
Town Celebration Committee 
Town Engineer 

Total General Government 



$291,424 



901.534 



507.858 
$393,676 



Balance July I, 1984 




$2,527,042 


Deductions: 






Audit Adjustments 


395 




Tax Titles Taken 


213.470 




Appropriations STM 11-19-84 


594.828 




Appropriations STM 04-29-85 


25.500 




Reduce Tax Rate 1985 


323.683 


1.157.876 
1.369.166 


Additions: 




Tax Titles Redeemed 


140.494 




Omitted Assessments 


24,947 




Redemption —Tax Deferral 


11,056 




Excess Estimated Receipts 


703.584 




Unexpended Appropriations 


227.972 


1.108.053 



$2,477,219 



1.100,000 
1.377.219 

2.477.219 



1985 



300 


300 


98.423 


104.210 


73.444 


79.615 


136,965 


153.309 


148.475 


175,711 


73.445 


86,195 


98.489 


104,791 


39.591 


63,781 


19,885 


25.135 


26,075 


27.587 


1,622 


1,652 


15.649 


56,665 


4.192 


4,989 


416 


584 


7.535 


6,546 


996 


241 


996 


1,316 


50 


150 


63.198 


75.869 


339 


458 





39.914 


810,085 


1.009,018 



Public Safety: 

Police Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Purchase Cruisers 
Mutual Aid 
Purchase Radios 
Equipment and Repairs 

Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Equipment and Repairs 

Total Fire Department 

Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Service 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 
Inspection 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Civilian Defense 



Public Health: 

Salaries and Expense 
Landfill Closure 
Mosquito Control 
Hazardous Materials 



Sewer Commission: 
Expenses 
Professional Fees 
Facilities Plan (Grant) 
Sewer Plans & Design 



Highway Department: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Waste Collection 
Snow and Ice Removal 
Sidewalks 

Purchase of Equipment 
Drainage Construction 
Resurface Streets 
Chapter 90 Construction 



1,510,113 


1,699.555 


186,036 


252,842 


54.108 


49,593 


2,000 


1,960 





1,799 


13.181 


9,409 


1,765,438 


2,015,158 


1,835,156 


1,938,975 


105.852 


98,089 


25,800 


97,245 


1,966.808 


2.134,309 


74,300 


74,900 


17.075 


10,881 


10,747 


11,808 


127.342 


142,535 


30.962 


31,349 


1.400 


1,400 


2,000 


2,000 


3,454 


3,332 


267,280 


278,205 


88,610 


100,305 


12.000 


11,573 


8,061 


8,250 


2.283 


2,438 


110,954 


122,566 


4,759 


7,776 


4,034 


62,582 


58,730 








207,057 


67,523 


277,415 


441,552 


481,163 


282,621 


300,473 


459,764 


480,454 


369,793 


320.123 


8,665 


16,413 


89,628 


37,535 


19,640 


106,516 


261.720 


320,621 


238,357 


268,569 


2,171.740 


2,331,867 



80 



Street Lighting: 

Veterans Benefits: 
Salaries and Expense 
Cash and Material Grants 



Libraries: 

Wages and Salaries 

Expense 

Books and Periodicals 

Carriage House Renovation 

Gifts from Individuals 

Automation of Records 



Parks and Recreation: 
Parks 

Varney Playground 
Recreation Commission 
Edwards Memorial Beach 



Insurance: 

Property Liability & All Types 
Chapter 32 B 



Schools: 

School Committee 

Superintendents Office 

Supervision 

Principals 

Teachers 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio-Visual 

Guidance 

Attendance 

Health Services 

Transportation 

Food Services 

Athletics 

Student Activities 

Custodial 

Utilities 

Maint. of Grounds 

Maint. of Buildings 

Maint. of Equipment 

Programs w/o Schools 

Television 

Chapter 766 



School Revolving Funds: 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Adult Education 
Civic Activities 
Loss of Books 

Out of Town Student Tuition 
Summer School 
Child Care 
Grant Accounts 



Regional Vocational School: 

School Renovations 
School Computer Purchase 



Cemeteries: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Improvements & Development 
Beautification P/C Transfer 
Sprinkler Repair— Trust Transfer 



Unclassified: 
Memorial Day 
Town Clock 

Town & Finance Com. Reports 
Mental Health Program 
Elder Services of Merr. Valley 
NMAC Assessment 



129.986 



149,547 



38,908 


42.627 


53.755 


62.236 


92.663 


104.863 


266.343 


303.814 


40.884 


56.999 


71,999 


73.397 


3.328 


2.475 


1,042 


2,459 


32,992 


10.161 


416,588 


449.305 


33.874 


41.414 


3.538 


4.965 


34.634 


48.325 


713 


703 


72.759 


95.407 


295.510 


320.930 


725.614 


832.367 


1.021.124 


1.153.297 


58.052 


30.948 


396.322 


397.435 


168.720 


154.785 


721.816 


752.039 


8.824.054 


9.587.280 


94.260 


90.811 


212.962 


208.457 


142.107 


125.160 


437.691 


485.888 


28.500 


30.500 


120.937 


132.577 


701.788 


654.184 


40.724 


42.279 


163.900 


188.867 


51.773 


56.625 


913.226 


966.480 


849.566 


763.637 


31.471 


23.408 


60.989 


57.301 


171.759 


172.275 


4.065 


4.851 





57.886 


1.715.085 


1.836.430 


15.909.767 


16.820.103 


664.104 


750.510 


40.330 


61.755 


53.391 


89.358 


33.162 


40.680 


1.871 


5.898 


408 


37.537 


30.757 


49.183 


271 


56.556 


285.383 


308.609 


1.109.677 


1.400.086 


489.936 


471.798 


312.587 


608.629 


2.294 


130.527 


314.881 


739.156 


114.201 


124.378 


20.227 


33.872 


7.758 


8.300 


8.470 


7.451 


1.383 


212 


152.039 


in sis 


1.159 


863 


520 


710 


5.288 


6.565 


8.695 


8.695 


1.800 


1.800 


8.216 


8.422 



Unemployment Benefits 

Cultural Council 

Cultural Council Revolving 

Cable TV Commission 

Renovate Town Office Building 

Court Judgement 

Vinal Sq. Rehab. Project (HUD) 

Bills of Prior Years 

Medical Expenses Retired Police and Fire 

Old Town Hall Study & Design 

Mass. Energy Resource Grant 

Old Town Hall Renovations 

Traffic Study — Chelms. St. 

North School Demolition 

Purchase Voting Machines 

Preliminary Project Studies 



Agency. Trust & Investment: 

Fees & Licenses Due State & County 

Payroll Deductions 

Retirement — Pension Expense 

State and County Assessments 

Cemetery P C Bequests 

Tax Levv Refunds 

Performance Bonds 

Misc. Trust Funds 

Water District Liens 

Outside Details 

Merrimack Education Center 

Tailings 

Misc. Refunds 



Interest— Loans: 
Anticipation Loans 
Bonded Debt 



Principal — Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 
Bonded Debt 
Short Term Notes 



W.ii!. tuts Previous Year; 

Total Cash Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand June 30 



RECEIPTS 



General Revenue: 
Taxes: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Title Redemptions 

Lieu of Taxes — State Property 

Lieu of Taxes— Veterans Abatements 

Elderly Exemptions 



Fines and Permits: 
Court Fines 

Permits. Fees 8t Licenses 
Alcoholic 



Grants and Gifts: 
County 
Dog Fund 

Total Grams from County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing 
Com. Dev Program (HUD) 
EDA Energy Grant 
EPA Grant (Sewer Com.) 



42.311 


63.302 


100 


81 


8.247 


14,035 


1.833 


2.992 


10.767 








24,040 


223,289 


26.452 


642 





17,600 


3.558 


1,431 





88 





36.916 








30.900 





21,776 


40.610 





1.650 


2,755 


411.162 


216,946 


4.555 


12.834 


6.669.030 


7,889.129 


731.269 


823,106 


620.953 


633.293 


24.617 


20.730 


271.344 


268.737 


3.650 


6,337 


7.959 


4.920 


3.778 


4.540 


217.682 


234.726 


108.753 


109.552 


7.691 


3,342 


696 


650 


8.671.977 


10.011.896 


228.958 


233.886 


112.967 


56.370 


341.925 


290,256 


25.000,000 


12,500.000 


265.000 


265.000 


573.061 


843.642 


25.838.061 


13,608.642 


7.059.992 


162.702 


69.192.365 


54.016.755 


5.624.732 


4.922.085 


74.817.097 


58.938.840 



1984 



3.878 



3.878 



1985 



567.628 


633,196 


17.428.525 


18,334.048 


1.033 


636 


1.122.789 


1.423.151 


79.746 


147,442 


3.715 


3.329 


9.427 


9.126 


39.952 


31.056 


19.252.815 


20.581.984 


187.995 


158.401 


338.409 


459.709 


25.590 


26.515 


551.994 


644.625 



2.959 



2.959 



13.723 


14.417 


460.230 


585.633 


231.194 


21.644 





83.153 


29.400 






734.547 



704.847 



81 



State: 

Aid to Education 

School Bldg. Assistance 

School Lunch Program 

Tuition— Trans. State Wards 

School Transportation 

Aid to Public Libraries 

Highway — Chapter 81 

Highway and Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 

School Grant Programs 

Div. of Water Pollution Control 

Arts Lottery Council 

Chapter 90 Reimbursement 

Residential School Tuition 

Sec. of State — Elections 

Chapter 90 Construction Grant 

Other State Grants 



Individuals: 

Library— Carriage House 
Library— Purchase of Books 
Council on Aging 
Board of Health 
School Department 
Recreation Commission 
Cultural Council 



Lowell Regional Transit Authority 

Departmental Receipts: 
Selectmen 
Treasurer/Collector 
Town Clerk 
Police 

Public Buildings 
Highway 
Dog Officer 
Veterans Benefits 
Misc. 

Sale of Town Property 
Recreation Revolving Fund 



School: 

Cafeteria Lunch Sales 
Tuition, Rents & Misc. 
Athletic Programs 



Library: 
Fines 

Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots and Graves 
Internments 
P/C Bequests 



Total Departmental Receipts 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Note — School Renovations 
School Computer 
Other Temporary Notes 



Interest Income: 
Taxes 
Deposits 

Fedl. Revenue Sharing 
Misc. 



Unpaid Warrants— Current Year 
Refunds: 



3.559.066 


4,234,202 


183.925 


194,995 


128.465 


103,109 


124,192 


44,950 


442,123 


531,150 


24,625 


24,626 


149,065 


135,773 


148.672 


148,672 


2.448.351 


2,684,457 


24.893 


23,749 


3,471 


10,066 


277.321 


315,208 


5,877 





6,725 


12,304 


182.427 


361,277 


118.584 





1,709 


23,381 


99.771 


99,771 





46.113 


7.929.262 


8.993.803 


2,446 


2,645 


1.757 


2,670 


7,550 


2,975 





500 





50 





542 





3,728 


11.753 


13.110 


20,663 


23,105 


1.181 


4.163 


22.902 


23.482 


6.977 


3,742 


16.825 


22.352 


23.903 


29.605 


268 


1,104 


815 


98 


6,182 


6.252 


9,979 


2,199 





28,000 


1,974 


1,725 


91,006 


122,722 


564.217 


637.389 


156.654 


289,249 


45,386 


63.485 


766,257 


990.123 


6.471 


13.909 


7.450 


11,485 


15.391 


16,445 


24.617 


21,130 


47.458 


49.060 


911,192 


1.175,814 


27,000.000 


10,500,000 


293.037 


715,000 





133,965 





1,025.378 


27,293,037 


12,374.343 


135,359 


130.499 


218.702 


245.968 


9,997 


24,477 





6,972 


364.058 


407.916 


162.702 


328.435 


5.109 


79,467 



Agency, Trust & Investment: 
Payroll Withholdings 
Cemetery P/C Interest 
Licenses Due County 
Licenses Due State 
Library Trust Funds 
Water District Liens 
Stabilization Fund 
Outside Detail 

Merrimack Education Center 
Tailings 

Performance Bonds 
Other Trust Funds 
Sale of Tax Possession Property 



Total Receipts 

Cash Balance on Hand July 1 

Total 



6,684,017 


7,496,304 


38,800 


37,936 


7.756 


6.552 


1,357 


1.750 


7,959 


4,920 


3,974 


4,540 


444,437 


66,229 


248,711 


245,364 


106,326 


109,552 


13,059 


1,226 


4,353 


6,327 


1,500 


3,000 


500 





7,562,749 


7,983,700 


64,803,759 


53,314.108 


10,013.338 


5,624,732 


74,817.097 


58.938,840 



82 



TOTAL 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS— 1985 
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



117 



123 



158 



182 



143 



117 



121 



136 



148 



136 



124 



Dec. Total 



Building 


11 


8 


15 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


6 


6 


4 


4 


75 


Auto 


5 


4 


9 


7 


9 


3 


6 


7 


11 


6 


5 


5 


77 


Outdoor 


6 


11 


40 


57 


25 


9 


13 


11 


7 


11 


8 


6 


204 


Mutual Aid 





1 


8 


8 





1 





1 





1 


3 


1 


24 


Medical 


35 


33 


30 


37 


33 


39 


28 


30 


24 


38 


33 


28 


388 


Service 


11 


5 


9 


8 


10 


5 


9 


9 


6 


7 


11 


15 


105 


Investigation 


44 


51 


41 


53 


54 


50 


59 


73 


87 


63 


55 


49 


679 


False Alarms 


5 


10 


6 


7 


7 


6 


2 


2 


7 


4 


5 


5 


66 



113 1618 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Dear Board Members, 

The Fire Department was deeply saddened by the un- 
timely death of Captain Thomas Curran. Tom was an out- 
standing and dedicated officer who loved the fire 
department. We miss him. 

The department received a new 110 ft. Aerial ladder and 
a new 4-Wheel Drive Pick-up Truck. Both were authoriz- 
ed at the Annual Town Meeting. 

Due to the tremendous industrial growth we are re- 
questing four additional men for Engine 4 in east, and also 
one additional man to be assigned to Fire Prevention in 
order to comply with the new EPA Regulations and on 
hazardous materials-hazardous waste and for the other 
regulations which have been passed by State and Federal 
Agencies. 

Many thanks to all town officials and employees for the 
excellent cooperation given to the fire department during 
the past year, and again congratulations and thanks to the 
men of the department for continuing to maintain the high 
standard of courage and ability that has been shown in the 
past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Chief of the Department 



Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Chief 
James A. Sousa 

Captains 
Thomas Curran (drcca*^ 4 s 85> James M. Spinney 
Charles S. Galloway, Jr. Ronald J. Sawicki 

Charles A. Schramm James Boermeester 02/5/85) 

FIREFIGHTERS 



Arthur G. Anderson 
Robert K. Adams (r«irrd ) 
Jack D. Hadley (Atimg c. P < > 
Robert A. Bennett 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
James P. Flaherty 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil P. Magiera 
John P. DePalma 
Walter F Adley, Jr. 
Dennis Vargeletis 
Richard L. Grenon 
William V. Cady, Jr. 
William F. Curran 
Daniel T. Reid 
Joseph J. Spinazola 
Michael McTeague 
Ernest J. Frobese 



James P. Curran 
Peter C. Johnson 
William M. Burke, Jr. 
Edward J. Nolet 
Michael F Curran 
Michael D. Ridlon 
William H. Jamer 
Raymond R. Kydd 
William Dalton 
Thomas D. Miskell 
David Gelineau 
Brian J. Stanton 
Richard Miller 
Dennis Keohane 
John L. Carroll 
David C. Campbell 
William Campbell 
James F. Reid 
John D. Ubele 
Francis M. Conlin 
David Clancy 
Bruce Donovan 
Christopher Finnigan 
John Reid 
William Keohane 
Patrick Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
Mary Ann Koulas (Dc P i. ami.i 
George Fetzer iMtchamo 



83 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, MA 

Dear Board Members: 

I hereby submit my report of the Highway Department 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1985: 

The year was not as productive a year as I wish it could 
have been. Extreme cuts in my budget eliminated many 
of the projects I had planned to do. The budget cuts were 
the greatest in the drainage account and the street resur- 
facing account. I don't think one Department should suf- 
fer so that another can prosper. Each and every department 
is totally equal in making Chelmsford as great as it is. 

I would like to commend the members of the Highway 
Department for their accomplishments during the past 
year. The Department showed determination, diligence 
and civic pride in completing the work schedules. 

I wish to express my appreciation to all town officials 
and the various Departments for the fine cooperation given 
to me and the Highway Department. 

A special "thank you" to James Pearson, our Town 
Engineer, newly appointed in 1985. A very helpful and long 
needed Department. 

Also, a "thank you" to all the residents who called and 
wrote to me expressing their gratitude. Also to the residents 
who did not express their gratitude. That is the reason I 
am always available to try to take care of the residents of 
Chelmsford. 

Asphalt Resurfacing Account 

No bituminous concrete Type 1-1 was used in the re- 
surfacing of various streets. The money was cut from the 
budget. 

Liquid Asphalt Resurfacing Account 

Approximately 80,836 gallons of asphalt emulsion, along 
with 3,000 tons of V£" crushed stone was used to make a 
cold asphalt mix, nick-named "Super-Mix" by the person- 
nel here. Approximately 6500 to 700 tons was manufac- 
tured and used. 

Another 26,950 gallons of MC-800 cut back asphalt was 
used to seal various streets within the town. A total of 
107,786 gallons of asphalt was purchased and used. 

Chapter 90, Construction Account 

The Chapter 90 Construction account was used to 
reconstruct a portion of Acton Road. This construction ex- 
tends from Park Road and Barton Hill Road to 300 feet 
beyond Byam Road. This construction amounts to 3000 
feet. 



From the Expense Account, Skyview Drive was com- 
pletely rebuilt. Also a portion of Brentwood Road and 
Pilgrim Road was rebuilt, totaling 800 feet. 

Drainage Projects 

Drainage projects completed in 1985 are as follows: 



Dunshire Drive 

Concord Road 
Robin Hill Rd. (#115) 

Robin Hill Rd. (#195) 
Pendleton Drive (#3) 

Bishop St. & State St. 

State Street 

Smith Street (#76) 

Lafayette Terrace & 

Berkeley Drive 
Hornbeam Hill Road 

Orchard Lane (#6) 
Orchard Lane (#16,18) 

Weide Street 



Pleasant Ave. (#6) 
Fenwick Drive (#18) 
Grove Street 

Brentwood Road 

Garland Road 

Proctor Road 
Hillside Lane 

Riverneck Rd. (#77,81) 

School Street 
Queen Street 



Cut 23 willow trees and 
removed the stumps. Ex- 
cavate 1200 feet of 
drainage swale. 
Excavate drainage ditch, 
approximately 1500 feet. 
432 feet 12" steel coated 
pipe. 300 feet 10" per- 
forated aluminum pipe. 7 
catch basins. 

143 feet 12" R.C. pipe, two 
catch basins. 

106 feet 10" perforated 

aluminum pipe, 1 catch 

basin. 

105 feet 12" steel coated 

pipe. Remove 3 willow 

trees. 

60 feet 10" perforated 

aluminum pipe. 

110 feet 12" aluminum 

pipe. 1 catch basin. 

162 feet 12" aluminum 

pipe. 

150 feet 12" R.C. pipe. 2 

catch basins. 162 feet 12" 

aluminum pipe. 2 catch 

basins. 

144 feet 12" R.C. pipe. 2 
catch basins. 

128 feet 10" perforated 
aluminum pipe. 2 catch 
basins. 

39 feet 19" R.C. pipe, 33 
feet 12" R.C. pipe, 684 feet 
12" PVC pipe. 2 manholes, 
3 catch basins. 
1 dry catch basin. 
91 feet 12" PVC pipe. 
426 feet 12" aluminum 
pipe, 2 catch basins. 
50 feet 10" perforated alu- 
minum pipe. 
123 feet 15" aluminum 
pipe. 

88 feet 18" R.C. pipe. 
7 feet 10" aluminum pipe, 

1 catch basin. 

80 feet 12" aluminum pipe, 
32 feet 6" aluminum pipe, 

2 catch basins. 

32 feet 12" asphalt coated 

pipe. 

381 feet 24" PVC pipe, 1 

catch basin, 2 manholes. 



84 



The maintenance of all streets was carried out in the 
usual manner. This includes the street sweeping, the basin 
cleaning, basin repairs, cleaning of culverts and easements, 
patching pot holes and washouts, erection of signs, pain- 
ting traffic lines and snow removal and other types of 
general maintenance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold Gray 
Supt. of Streets 

Highway Department Roster 

Superintendent of Streets 
Harold E. Gray 



Arthur G. Deschaine 



Foremen 

Frederick W. Greenwood 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

It has been six years since I was appointed to this posi- 
tion. A time when the growth in the Town reached heights 
we never could have forseen. Residential, both single family 
and Condo as well as Commercial and Industrial permits 
have been tremendous. I feel pride in stating that this 
Department has met that demand in services and enjoys 
an outstanding reputation with the Professional as well as 
the average taxpayers of this Town. Many additions, Pools, 
wood stoves, signs, etc. are still and will continue to be the 
mainstay of the Department. 

Over the last six years the budget for this Department has 
gone from $97,484 in 1980 to $142,695 in 1985. The total 
monies spent in the six years to operate the Department 
is approximately $726,262, which is a 45% increase. Dur- 
ing that time frame we collected a low of $74,737 in 1980 
to a high of $315,448 in 1985, a total of $1,049,506. 



Supervisor 

Pearl Koulas 

Grader Operator 

Arthur L. Newcomb 

Mechanics — Heavy Equipment 

Bobby Loyd John C. Ferreira, Jr. 

Engineering Equipment Operators 

Roy J. Costa Walter J. McLaughlin, Jr. 

David G. Harvey Richard J. Soucier 

Truck Drivers, Laborers 



Gary E. Beaulieu 
John J. Cronin 
James T Crotty 
Frederick J. Dillon 
Lawrence J. Ferriera 
Stephen K. Harvey 



Dennis J. Greenwood 

Ernest A. Howland 

Joseph C. Oczkowski 

Anthony L. Sousa 

John J. Williams 



Laborers 



Leslie L. Dukeshire, Jr. 



Kenneth R. Burroughs 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

Ronald W. Wetmore 
Inspector of Buildings 



Local Inspector 
Bruce H. Clark 

Plumbing Inspector 
William Shedd 

Elevator Inspector 
Joseph E. Morrissey 



Wire Inspector 
Francis E. Cunningham 

Gas Inspector 
Neal Stanley 

Principal Clerk 
Catherine R. Curran 



This represents a 300% increase in revenues. During the 
six year period the Department has returned to the Town 
$323,244. over what has been budgeted to run the Depart- 
ment which represents 45% return. My reason for supply- 
ing this information is to show how the Department has 
not only been self sufficient but also has assisted the Town 
in monies for other projects. 

I see no decline in growth for the coming years and would 
expect the same return in monies collected for the coming 
year. I wish to thank my Office Staff, Inspectors and clerical 
for the tremendous cooperation and assistance which it 
takes to accomplish these goals and various tasks. 

The following is a breakdown of the Permits issued for 
the year: 



PERMITS ISSUED 




TOTAL FEES 


1985 




COLLECTED 1985 


Building 


1073 


$215,962.- 


Wire 


1636 


$ 42,325.- 


Gas 


1170 


$ 


18,243.- 


Plumbing 


1168 


S 


30,191.- 


Signs 


69 


$ 


2,375.- 


Cert, of Occupancy 


11 


$ 


400.- 


Cert, of Inspection 


66 


s 


2,630.- 


Yard Sales 


192 


s 


1,005.- 


Elevator 


26 


s 


2,224.- 


Maps/Copies 




$ 

$3 


0.- 




5410 


15.448.- 



Senior Clerk 
Karen C. Flynn 



85 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Hall 

Billerica Road 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Board Members: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1985. 

At the present time the department is made up of 54 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 
James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 

Captains 

Armand J. Caron John J. Mack 

Phillip N. Molleur 

Sergeants 

Leslie H. Adams William R. McAllister 

Steven A. Burns Raymond G. McCusker 

Lance R. Cunningham Francis X. Roark 

John O. Walsh 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Mark L. Burlamachi, 
Robert M. Burns 
Paul F. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Jared S. Finnegan 
James T. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd, III 
Joseph R. Gamache 
Francis P. Kelly 
James J. Kerrigan 
Martin Krikorian 
Roland E. Linstad 
Russell H. Linstad 
John M. McGeown, Ji 
Peter C. McGeown 



Karen M. Pierro 
Jo-Ann E. Roth 
Donna J. Smith 



Jr 



Patrolmen 

Debra Metcalf 
James F. Midgley 
Brian F. Mullen 
Gail Mullen 
James F. Murphy 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Edward M. Rooney 
E. Michael Rooney 
Michael W. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert J. Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
Eugene W. Walsh 
William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Matrons 

Paula A. Rogers 
Barbara W. Gibb 



Principal Clerk 

Paula A. Rogers 

Senior Clerk 

Karen M. Pierro 

Jr. Clerks 

Marie K. DiRocco Jo-Ann E. Roth 

Donna J. Smith 

Custodian 
John P. Curran 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1984 1985 

Photocopying Machine 4,601.50 2,581.20 

Firearm Permits 2,761,00 1,251.00 

Bicycle Registrations 32.50 14.00 

Firearm Identification Cards 953.00 312.00 

Court Fines 177,677.00 158,401 .00 

Photographs 768.00 690.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 10,828.00 9,988.00 

Miscellaneous 5,196.00 284.00 

Parking Fines 9,855.00 12,675.00 

Restitution 6,207.00 3,144.00 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town 218 



,879.00 189,340.20 



ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 35 

Crimes Against Property 103 

Crimes Against Public Order 385 

DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1985 

Fines 275 

Placed on Probation 31 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 4 

Placed on File 36 

Not Guilty Finding 6 

Dismissed with Probable Cause 17 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

Without a Finding 52 

Committed to Youth Service Board 4 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 1 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 2 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 20 

Turned over to other out-of-town Police Depts. 

& Courts 133 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 131 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 61 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1984 1985 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 12,543 12,926 

Summons Served 354 461 

Licenses Suspended 232 130 

Accidents Reported 1 ,864 2,039 

Personal Injuries Reported 480 534 

Fatal Accidents 5 3 

Mileage of Cruisers 356,645 364,718 



86 



Special Property Checks (Auxiliary 

Police) 8,050 7,800 

Station Lockups 615 656 

Citations Issued 4,196 4,882 

Parking Violations 1,010 1,519 

Doors and Windows Found Open 41 57 

Detoxification Unit 143 148 

Seven new police officers joined the Department this past 
year, after graduating from the Massachusetts State Police 

Academy Basic Recruit Course. They are: Paul Richard- 
son, Francis Teehan, Alan Cote, Scott Ubele, Martin 
Kirkorian, Debra Metcalf and Gail Mullen. 

The Drug/ Alcohol Control Unit, consisting of a Sergeant 
and two Inspectors, was activated on a full-time basis. This 
structure has allowed the unit the opportunity to conduct 
several major intensive investigations and to perform con 
tinuous surveillances of potential areas of drug/alcohol 
abuse. All total, the unit was responsible for 139 arrests 
and 32 summonses, including 46 convictions, 69 pleas to 
sufficient facts for a finding of guilty- continued and several 
cases still pending in court. The dedication of the officers 
in the unit with the availability of the most sophisticated 
equipment has made this a very productive and outstan- 
ding year and we look forward to continued successes in 
1986. 

The Chelmsford Police Department with 40 other sur- 
rounding cities and towns continued its Inservice Train- 
ing Program at the Northeast Regional Police Institute 
located on the grounds of Tewksbury Hospital. Each of- 
ficer in our department will attend for one week, to be 
upgraded in Criminal Law. Court Procedure. Officers Sur- 
vival, Evidence, Use of Force, Civil Liability. Crisis In- 
tervention, Stress & Sensitivity Training. Training and 
knowledge will continue to be our goal in 1986. 

In a continuing effort to upgrade the quality of Police 
Services to the Town of Chelmsford, many officers attended 
specialized training schools run by the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Training Council, to increase their exper- 
tise in the Law Enforcement Field. 

SCHOOLS ATTENDED IN 1985 

Officer Survival 1 man 

Suicide Prevention 2 men-2 women 

Controlled Substance 7 men 

Motorcycle Operation 2 men 

Anti-Drunk Driving Seminar 2 men 

Advanced Auto Theft 2 men 

Victim Abuse-Advanced 3 men 

Advanced Threat Management 1 man 

Chemical Agents 1 man 

Physical Evidence 2 men 

Stakeouts and Surveillance 3 men 

Identi-Kit 2 men 

Crime Scene Search School 3 men 

Spanish for Police Officers 1 man 

Background Investigation 1 man 

Pornography Issues for Law Enforcement 3 men 

Matrons — self defense 2 men 



Intelligence Analysis 

Basic Photography 

Basic Dispatch Training 

Criminal Law & Procedure Update 

Organized Crime Seminar 

Basic Fingerprinting 

CPR — Instructor Course 

Drug/ Alcohol Youth 

AIDS — Seminar 

Motor Vehicle Law 

Search and Seizure 

Crime Scene Management 

Police Information Seminar 

Juvenile Crime 

Basic Photo School 



2 men 
2 men 
2 men 
2 men 
1 man 
5 men 
1 man 

1 man 

2 men 
1 man 

1 man 

3 men 

2 men 
2 men 
1 man 



At the present time 28 members of the Police Depart- 
ment have received college degrees to date, and 12 addi- 
tional officers are presently enrolled in degree colleges and 
universities. 

This year, as in the past several years, the Town was 
able to save several thousand dollars by purchasing new 
Police Cruisers through the Greater Boston Police Council. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen and all town officials, departments, 
and committees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
Police Department and also congratulate all police and 
civilian personnel of this department for once again, main- 
taining their high performance standards. 

Sincerely, 

Raymond P. McKeon 
Chief of Police 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

During 1985, the Auxiliary Police Unit was called upon 
to serve at many events. Some of the events were the Boston 
Marathon, various local road races, Memorial Day Parade, 
July 3rd and 4th Festivities, Middlesex County Kennel Club 
Dog Show, Chelmsford High School Graduation and 
Halloween School Protection duties. In addition to those 
scheduled events we were called out in emergency situa- 
tions such as the brush fires we were plagued with this past 
spring and the fire at the Wotten Lane Mills. The Aux- 
iliary cruiser assisted the regular officers at numerous motor 
vehicle accidents and emergencies. 

This year we had three officers graduate from the Mass- 
achusetts Criminal Justice Training Council Reserve Of- 
ficers Academy and we currently have two more officers 
scheduled to attend. The academy meets 3 hours a week 
for 14 weeks and covers Criminal and Motor Vehicle Laws, 
traffic control, report writing, and police procedures. The 
officers are certified in CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resusci- 
tation), First Aid and Firearms. The In-Service training 
program at the Auxiliary is also continuing monthly with 
training in firearms, various training films, recertification 
of all members in CPR. 



87 



Operation House Check operated 150 nights and the 
unit checked 3,800 vacant houses and 4,000 school and 
Town Property locations. The Auxiliary cruisers covered 
31,000 miles during their assigned duties. The men and 
the women of the Auxiliary donated 4,300 hours to the 
town over the past year. 

It is with great sadness that I report the death of Aux- 
iliary Captain Frederick Meehan, who was one of the 
original founding members. Fred will be missed greatly. 

This past year for the Auxiliary sponsored Explorer 
Scout Law Enforcement Post #370 was an active one. The 
young men and women assisted the Auxiliary at all of the 
past years scheduled events. The post meets weekly at the 
Auxiliary building and we assist them with training and 
coordinating their activities. These young men and women 
are the future of Chelmsford and I thank them for their 
assistance during the year. 

I would like to thank my Auxiliary Officers and their 
families for donating so much of their time to the Town. 
I would like to thank the Chief and the Deputy Chiefs for 
their continued support and assistance and a special thanks 
to the Oficers of the Police Department for their support 
and assistance over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 

Director Auxiliary Police 

Roster Auxiliary 

ROSTER 

Director: 

Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 

Co-Ordinator: 

Basil Larkin, Sergeant (Retired) 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Elizabeth Berger 
Kenneth Berger 
Neal Casales 
Larry Dillon 
Eric Gordon 
Jessie Harris 
Ellen Klimm 
Robert Klimm 
Laure Lavoie 
Daniel McLarney 



Erik Merrill 
Edward Norton 
Bradford Poole 
James Quinn 
Dave Ramsay 
Ralph Roscoe 
Michael Taplin 
Paul Villare 
Robert Villare 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

During the year 1985 I investigated 19 dog bite cases. 

I have vaccinated 111 Animals at the Rabies clinic in 
April at the McCarthy School. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Martin A. Gruber, D.V.M. 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Daniel Burke, Chairman Robert Kydd, Vice Chairman 

Eileen Duffy Gustave Fallgren 

Harold Organ, Jr. 



Robert Scharn 



Ronald Pare 



Alternates 

Denis Valdinocci 

Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 

Hearing Statistics: 

Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 

Variances 90 79 8 3 

Special Permits 22 19 2 1 

Total 112 98 10 4 

The Board met more often in 1985, twice per month 
as the number of hearings increased 30% over 1984. The 
Board continues to be inundated with either commer- 
cial/industrial property appeals or additions and zoning 
violations found as lending institutions require zoning com- 
pliance prior to issuance of first or second mortgages. 

The Board is faced in the years to come with major deci- 
sions to be made on allowing less suitable land for develop- 
ment. As a result, the decisions could have a major impact 
on traffic, safety and water quality. The Board recognizes 
this as it's major challenge of the future. 

On behalf of the Board, I would like to take this op- 
portunity to thank all Town Boards and Officials for their 
assistance and cooperation during 1985. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel W. Burke, Chairman 



88 



CABLE COMMISSION 



Members of the Commission 



Richard Ste. Marie 
Norman C. Locke 
John Fisher 
Walter Kivlan 
Gary Frascarelli 
Marianne Paresky 
Gerry Rigby 

Jacob Sartz 
Ford Cavallari 
Patt Moser 



Chairman 

Vice Chairman and Secretary 

Treasurer 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member and Director 

Community TV 

Alternate Member 

Alternate Member 

Media Director Chelmsford 

School System 



In 1985, Cable Commission activities included: 

— Securing the services of an additional channel (Chan- 
nel 42) for use by the town at no charge. Plans for 
the use of this channel, including the possibility of 
data transmission, are in progress. 

— Discussing new approaches for cooperative efforts 
toward improving subscriber services with Mr. Donald 
Ratte', General Manager of Lowell Cable. 

Welcoming Mr. Rigby as the new Director of Com- 
munity TV Services. Mr. Rigby succeeded Ms. Patt 
Moser who has been appointed Media Director for 
the Chelmsford School System. 

— Working with the Cable 43 Education Foundation 
in presenting a telethon on May 18 which, with the 
help of many townspeople, realized approximately 
55,000.00 for the Channel 43 operating budget. 

In other matters, arrangements have been made for the 
installation of a character generator and modulator at the 
central fire station. This will allow for immediate inclu- 
sion of emergency notices (no school announcements, etc.) 
on the Channel 43 message board. 

The Commission expresses its sincere thanks to Lowell 
Ford for the donation to the town of a van which will be 
used for Channel 43 on location productions. 

The Commission also wishes to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, the School Committee and Administration and 
the Citzens of Chelmsford for continued support and 
cooperation. 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund. 
Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



Chairman 

James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



and funding of the Annual Parade, the Chelmsford Lions 
Club for their planning and funding of Annual Country 
Fair on the Common, Chelmsford Arts Society for the Arts 
Fair at Town Hall, Chelmsford Jaycee's for the Road Races, 
Chelmsford Community Band for the Band Concert, 
Chelmsford Alpine Square Dancing Club, the various chur- 
ches in the Center Common area for their various activities 
and use of their parking areas, also many of the Town 
organizations that participated. The Committee, thanks 
the efforts of the Fire, Police, Public Works and Parks 
Departments for the assistance during the celebration. 
Many thanks to the many volunteer hours by the Chelms- 
ford Auxiliary Police and their Explorers Troup. 

The Committee are now making plans for the 1986 An- 
nual Fourth of July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund. Emergency Coordinator 
Kathryn Brough Deputy Chief Pennryn D. Fitts 

Melvin dejager William W. Edge 

George R. Dixon Capt. Charles S. Galloway 

Raymond Day Donald Savage 

The Civil Defense Committee (Office of Emergency 
Preparedness) which has been meeting on the second Tues- 
day of each month, preparing all necessary reports for the 
State and Federal Emergency Management Agencies, 
various forms and reports for surplus equipment at the 
Mass. Surplus Warehouse in Taunton. 

This year has been most active with various emergencies 
throughout the Town, large warehouse fire in North 
Chelmsford, Hurricane Gloria in September, various hazar- 
dous material spills and many volunteer hours were spent 
by this committee at the Emergency Operating Center at 
Town Office and at site of emergencies. 

The various training and attendance at schools and 
seminars on Natural Disasters Amateur Radio and 
Emergency Preparedness by the volunteers were most useful 
during the various emergencies. 

We wish to thank Board of Selectmen, Executive 
Secretary, all Town Department Heads and personnel for 
the outstanding cooperation this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



The Celebrations Committee, was once again active in 
coordinating and preparing for the 1985 Annual Fourth 
of July Celebration. Special thanks once again to the 
Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, No. 2310 for their organizing 



89 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging had a very successful 
year, measured by the quality and variety of services pro- 
vided to our older citizens. One highlight in 1985 was the 
direction of the Senior Center Building Fund Committee, 
which was formed in January, 1985 by recommendation 
of the Council. It was in response to the growing concern 
that the Town's present facility is inadequate that the 
SCBNC researched needs and plans, working closely with 
the Board of Selectmen. It has been very satisfying to see 
this group of individuals who are so involved in elderly con- 
cerns organize and work with a strong sense of unity and 
commitment to the project. The townspeople have sup- 
ported the plans for a new senior center with Special Town 
Meeting approval of the North School location and funds 
for design. We are very enthusiastic and look ahead to the 
coming year to begin actual building plans. 

Our present facility, the Louise Bishop Senior Center, 
continued to serve as a central point for information and 
activities for older citizens. Some of the regular programs 
included crafts, health and consumer education lectures, 
special health clinics, podiatry and hearing screening, in- 
come tax assistance, support groups and recreation. Other 
activities which were available in the community included 
the elderly lunch program, exercise/dance classes, walk- 
ing club and the public library mid-day forum series. The 
Council also supported an elderly transportation service 
which completed 5397 trips. The Respite Care program 
provided services to 46 Chelmsford families and was par- 
tially funded by a State grant award in 1985. The Council 
utilized State funds further to establish a home-delivered 
meals coordinator position, to oversee this important pro- 
gram, which served more than 15,000 meals in 1985. 

Chelmsford is a participating member of the Elder Ser- 
vices of the Merrimack Valley, and 135 older residents 
received the supportive home care services which helped 
them to remain in the community. Elder Services also fund- 
ed local elderly health education programs, legal services, 
protective services, mental health programs and guardian- 
ship services, of which Chelmsford residents took advantage. 

The Council was very fortunate to have the services of 
Senior Aides Lois Manty, Emily Mcintosh and Helen Palm- 
gren, who provided supportive contact to 250 clients in 
1985. The Council also benefited from the assignment of 
a new senior companion this year, Marion Gould, who was 
able to establish important friendships with several isolated 
elders. 

The Friends of the Senior Center, Inc. raised $5,923. for 
the Support Senior Services campaign. These funds will 
be used to support program such as Respite Care and 
home-delivered meals. With proceeds from the annual Fall 
Fair and individual donations a senior center building fund 
was established and approximately $8,000. has been ac- 
cumulated in this account. 



cooperation during the year. We would also like to recog- 
nize the many volunteers, more than fifty, who have 
regularly contributed their time and talent to serve our 
older citizens. 

In 1986 the Council plans to expand the home-delivered 
meals program so that meals will be available throughout 
the year. The Council's efforts will certainly be focused on 
new senior center plans next year. In order for construc- 
tion plans to progress, a substantial financial commitment 
must be made to the Town. The Council on Aging is com- 
mitted to keep this project in the public eye and believes 
that Chelmsford has the resources to build a new senior 
center and adequately serve its older citizens for many years 
to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Christina Ahern, Chairman 

Allen Bennett, Vice Chairman 

Esther Christensen, Treasurer 

Kathleen McDonald, Secretary 

John Cryan 

Paul Dube 

Annette Holtzman 

Howard Moore 

Fern Ricker 

Ashton Ricker 

Verne Woodward 



The Council would like to thank the townspeople and 
Town officials and Departments for their support and 



90 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



CHELMSFORD CULTURAL COUNCIL 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilities 


Exp. 


James McBride 


Chairman 


1986 


John Droescher 


Wetlands 


1987 


Karen Flynn 


Wetlands 


1986 


Charles Galloway 


Clerk & Reservation 






Mgt. 


1988 


William R. Greenwood 


Wetlands 


1988 


Judith Hass 


Land Acquisition 


1987 


John Scott 


Treasurer & Land Ac- 






quisition 


1988 


Marjorie Hennessy 


Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and desirable 
aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the time 
and effort of the Commission members. A total of twenty- 
three public hearings were held this year in accordance 
with Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued eighteen Orders of Conditions and five 
are still pending. Sixteen hearings were also held for Deter- 
mination of Applicability of the Wetlands Protection Act 
and thirteen Negative Determinations and three Positive 
Determinations were issued. 

Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the pro- 
tection of the Town's wetland areas. 

Cooperation between Town Boards has enabled the 
Commission to inform a developer at the beginning stages 
of the development that a filing with the Commission 
would be necessary. This helps to avoid costly and un- 
necessary expenses on the part of the Town and the 
developer. 

The Conservation Commission has made no new land 
acquisitions this year but is in the process of pursuing some 
in the future. 

The Commission continues to not only maintain the local 
reservations but is constantly trying to find ways to upgrade 
these natural areas. 



Current Members 

Pat Fitzpatrick, Co-Chairman 

Joy Chadwick, Co-Chairman 

Marion Gould, Treasurer 

Flavia Cigliano, Corresponding Secretary 

Gina Kalogeropoulos, Recording Secretary 

Bill Baird 

Helen Glinos 

Ivor Hartley 

Meetings: 

The 2nd Monday of each month. 

The 2nd and 4th Mondays, April and October 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is looking forward to 
another productive year. A full 100% of the 1984 Telethon 
pledges for the Old Town Hall was realized and a piano 
was purchased for cultural activities. The Old Town Hall 
has been used by many associations including: The Mer- 
rimack Valley Chorale, The Chelmsford Choral Society, 
The Chelmsford Art Society, Cable 43, The Chelmsford 
League of Women Voters, The Merrimack Valley Pen- 
women, The Chelmsford Quilters, The Toastmaster, A.F.S. , 
Patchwork Theatre, Open Gate Garden Club and The 
Grange. An on-going study of the accoustical engineering 
project at the Old Town Hall will continue and hopefully 
will be resolved in 1986. so that more cultural entertain- 
ment will be available to the Town. 

Three resignations were accepted this year: 
June Fraser 
Rachel Vondal 
Ted Jones 

Council Member, Bonnie Wilder, fulfilled her term 
and did not seek reappointment. 

Three new members were welcomed: 
Gina Kalogeropoulos 
Helen Glinos 
Ivor Hartley 

Mass. Arts Lottery Funding — Twice Yearly 

May, 1985 -Chelmsford's Allotment -$6,318. 

21 Applicants 16 Recommended 
November, 1985 -Chelmsford's Allotment $6,318. 

19 Applicants 16 Recommended 

Council sponsored a Regional Meeting on March 21st 
at the Old Town Hall. In attendance were Sen. Carol 
Amick, Rep. Bruce Freeman, Members of the Arts Lot- 
tery State Committee and representatives from cultural 
councils in the surrounding communities. 

Three Council Members attended the September 21st 
Arts Lottery Convention in Auburn for the purpose of com- 
municating with other cultural councils across the State. 



91 




HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr. Chairman 
John P. Richardson, Vice Chairman 
Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Harold J. Davis 
Leon LeMaire III 

Alternates 

Richard Burkinshaw 
Bruce Foucar 



79 Elm Street, Chelmsford Historical Society 



Clerk 

Mary E. 



Caffelle 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

This year, the Historical Commission was involved in a 
project to replace and post various markers designating 
historic sites including the signs marking the borders of our 
National Historic District in Chelmsford Center. The com- 
mission frequently met with local developers in the interest 
of preserving and protecting our local heritage. 

The commission took pride in the honor that a house 
located at 79 Elm Street was named to the National Historic 
Register of Homes. This was the Oliver Hutchins house, 
built in the early 1820's, an unspoiled example of Asher 
Benjamin architecture. 

Monthly meetings are held in the 1802 Schoolhouse on 
the fourth Monday and are open to the public. 

Martha P. Sanders, Chairman 

J. Perry Richardson 

Jane Drury 

Joseph Kopycinski 

Stephen Stowell 

Lawrence Fadjo 

Florence Gullion 



The Historic District Commission met regularly at the 
1802 Schoolhouse on the first Monday of each month. 
Special meetings were also scheduled, when necessary dur- 
ing the year. 

The Commission accepted 27 applications for Cer- 
tificates of Appropriateness. 15 public hearings were held. 
12 were waived by the Commission when the architectural 
features involved were deemed to have an insubstantial ef- 
fect on the Historic District and after the owners of all ad- 
joining property were notified and had expressed no 
objection. 

There were 20 Certificates of Appropriateness and 6 Cer- 
tificates of Non-applicability or Hardship issued by the 
Commission during the year. 1 Certificate of Appropriate- 
ness was denied. 

The Historic District Commission will continue in its ef- 
fort to protect and preserve the distinctive character of the 
district. We hope that we can provide the town with a con- 
tinuing sense of pride in the past through the visual exam- 
ple of our heritage as it exists in the district. 

We feel that our decisions during the past year have 
helped to maintain the historic and aesthetic quality of the 
area. 

We hope to encourage the improvement of settings of 
our buildings so that they can be viewed to the best ad- 
vantage. 

When new construction occurs we will encourage the use 
of design which is compatible with that in existence in the 
district. 



The business area in the district can be enhanced by the 
thoughtful use of appropriate signage and the elimination 
of that which detracts from the quality of the area. 

We would like to thank the townspeople of Chelmsford 
and the property owners within the district for their contin- 
uing cooperation and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr., Chairman 



92 



HOLIDAY DECORATIONS COMMITTEE 

List of Members: 

Nancy Leonard, Chairperson 

Dana Caffelle, Vice Chairperson & Recording Secretary 

Liz Gavriel, Publicity 

Gail Lapan, Treasurer 

Jean Organ, Corresponding Secretary 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr. , Work Committee Chairperson 

Dawn Siphol 

Jean Parlee 

Helen George 

Carol Hill 

Rosemary Walsh 

Charlene Creegan 

Work Committee: 
Brian Leonard Nick Gavriel 

Sam Organ Charles Parlee 

Ted Siphol Bruce Foucar 

For the past three years the Holiday Decorations Com- 
mittee has been working not only at the lighting of the 
center, but also at purchasing flags to decorate the center 
on several holidays between April and November. 

Accomplishments: 



1. 



This past year we have purchased fourteen more flags 
which brings the total to 75 flags which have been 
donated by the townspeople, organizations, and/or 
businesses. 



2. This past year we had Boy Scout Troop 205 from the 
Trinity Lutheran Church responsible for putting the 
60 flags out and picking them up from April to 
November and returning them to the Old Town Hall. 

3. Once again we had a very successful lighting 
ceremony on the common this past December 1st. 
This year Santa came on a fire truck from the Center 
Station. This year we were very fortunate to have the 
Central Baptist Church come forward and offer to 
serve coffee, hot chocolate, and deserts following the 
ceremony in their hall. 

4. We added more lights on the shrubs near the Cen- 
tral Baptist Church end of the common and on the 
shrubs on the common near Jack's Diner. We also 
started replacing some of the older strings of lights 
that have given us problems. 



Goals: 



To raise enough money to continue replacing the 
older sets of lights, replace the bulbs that either get 
stolen or broken, purchase more new sets of lights 
because the shrubs are getting bigger each year, and 
replace the flags that have been stolen and never re- 
covered. 



3. With the additional flags we have today and the an- 
ticipation of more donations for flags in the future, 
we need to expand where we will place them. A cou- 
ple of ideas are to place them on the sidewalk side 
of Academy Street, continue down North Road 
towards the Fire Station, possibly around the center 
flag pole, and expand down Chelmsford Street, but 
none of these ideas are firm yet. 

4. We are in search of a new Boy Scout Troop to take 
over this year's responsibilities of putting the flags out 
and picking them up. 

5. Attend one monthly meeting of Boy Scout Troop 205 
to present to the boys and leaders who participated 
in the flag project their Award of Appreciation Cer- 
tificates. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Nancy Leonard, Committee Chairperson 



INSECT AND PEST CONTROL 

The Insect and Pest Control Department has continued 
with the removal of dead oak and elm trees resulting from 
past Gypsy Moth infestation as well as the Dutch Elm 
Disease. Each year we hope for less removals but as yet we 
haven't seen it. 

With the assistance of other agencies this department 
will continue it's limited poison ivy programs as needed. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Richard J. Day 



2. Solicit further donations for flags. 



93 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



MEMBERS 



Gerald Coutu 
Jack Bilodeau 
Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
Bruce MacDonald 
Paul Murphy 
Joan Murray 
David Roberts 
Evelyn Newman 
Lorraine Murphy 



Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Part-time Clerk 



The Chelmsford Recreation Commission is appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Commission is charged with 
the responsibility of developing, administering and suppor- 
ting programs and facilities designed to fill the recreation 
needs of the residents of the Town. 

The major portion of the Commission's activities is, and 
always has been, connected with organized youth activities. 
The Commission provides very limited funding for these 
activities;' its main contribution to their success is as a 
liaison between organizations and other Town authorities, 
including the School Committee, the Board of Selectmen, 
the Parks Department and the Varney Commission. In- 
deed, the success of these youth activities would not be 
possible without the continued cooperation of these com- 
munity authorities, especially in the area of scheduling field 
and gymnasiums for all recreational activities. 

Participation in the Summer Program continues to in- 
crease with the following activities being offered through- 
out the Summer months: Physical Education, outside and 
inside Basketball, Tennis lessons, Playground Programs at 
Varney Playground, Westland School and South Row 
School, a Swim and Swimming Lessons Program at Crystal 
Lake, Cross Country Track and Field at the High School 
Track. A seven-week series of free programs for children 
is offered on Wednesday mornings throughout the Sum- 
mer at the Town Offices gymnasium. A series of Concerts 
on the Common by the Chelmsford Community Band takes 
place on Tuesday evenings throughout the Summer. 

The Southwell Field Project is progressing, after some 
delays and bidding is anticipated after the first of the year 
with construction to take place in the Spring and Summer 
of 1986. 



citizens. Many meetings have been held and a question- 
naire has been developed and is being mailed to Chelms- 
ford households to determine whether or not the 
townspeople of Chelmsford are interested in pursuing the 
development of a Boys/Girls Club under the auspices of 
the Boy's Club of America. 



SIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Deborah Dion 
John Harrington 
Jean Rook 

The Sign Advisory Committee met the second Wednes- 
day of each month to review sign applications. If a pro- 
posed sign conforms to the by-laws it is automatically 
approved. 

If a sign does not conform to the by-laws, the commit- 
tee must make a recommendation to the Board of Appeals. 
We have appreciated the volunteer time, cooperation and 
advice we have received from Building Inspector, Ronald 
Wetmore. He has upheld the sign by-laws in an exemplary 
manner. 

Continued vigilance is required. In the future the com- 
mittee would like to see more attention to town aesthetics, 
especially to remedy the bleak look of Chelmsford Street. 
This may be best accomplished by depressing electric wires 
and planting trees. 



Conservation land, through the efforts of the Conserva- 
tion Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the Recrea- 
tion Commission, will be developed for use as Soccer Fields 
on Mill Road to help in the development of a program to 
rest and restore the remaining Town fields. 

A Boys/Girls Club Steering Committee was formed in 
September of 1985 consisting of members from Chelms- 
ford youth organizations, representatives from private in- 
dustry, the Chelmsford Elks, the League of Women Voters, 
the Chelmsford Jaycees, the Chelmsford Booster's Club, the 
Recreation Commission and several interested private 



94 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford, I am submitting the annual report 
of activities of this department as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year of 1985. 

Veterans' Benefits is a state mandated organization duly 
authorized under Chapter 115, MGL Section 1 through 15. 
Two valued services are provided. One pertains to assistance 
with federal benefits under the Veterans' Administration, 
the other to financially aid and give assistance to qualified 
veterans and their dependents of veterans under Veteran 
Services. 

Veterans Administration Federal Expenditures Town of 
Chelmsford 



Autos and special equip- 




ment for disabled veterans 


S 2,600 


Compensation to depen- 




dents for veterans' service- 




connected death 


11.150 


Dependents Indemnity 




Compensation (DIC) 


200,000 


Sons, daughters, wives and 




widows education 


38,000 


Specially adapted housing 




for disabled veterans 


3,800 


Veterans death pension 


205,890 


Veterans disability compen- 




sation 


1,500.000 


Veterans disability pension 


2,525.000 


Veterans insurance and in- 




demnities 


235,855 


Veterans readjustment 




training 


255,000 


Veterans burial awards and 




other miscellaneous benefit 




payments 


39,600 


Vocational rehabilitation 




training for disabled 




veterans 


10,200 



At present I am serving on the Executive Board for Mass- 
achusetts Veterans' Agents Association, active with Mid- 
dlesex County Veterans' Agents Association and a member 
of American Society of Notaries. 

Respectfully submitted 

Mary K. McAuliffe, LSW 

Veterans' Agent 



95 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee received one 
application for assistance during the year of 1985. The re- 
quest, which was received through the Veterans' Agent, was 
for medical assistance, and after a complete investigation, 
the committee voted to approve the payment. 

The committee has through the years assisted many 
veterans of World War II and the procedure has always 
been to make payments to vendors for heat, light, rent, 
clothing and medical needs. No cash grants are ever ap- 
proved. 

The committee did approve during 1985 the transfer of 
$3,000.00 from the regular savings account at the Central 
Savings Bank, earning at the rate of five and one half per- 
cent, to the ComFed Savings Bank, where a Certificate of 
Deposit was purchased, and which will earn at the rate of 
nine and three quarters percent. 

The fund was established by Town Meeting vote in 1947 
and is administered by a committee of twelve members; 
all veterans of World War II. The committee members are 
selected to represent each of the twelve voting precincts of 
the town. The Selectmen annually appoint the committee 
members. 

The total value of the invested funds is now $10,888.77. 
For details pertaining to the finances of this committee 
please refer to the annual report of the treasurer. 

The list of names of present members of the committee 
follows, in the event that future applicants for assistance 
may wish to make inquiries for information. 



Precinct 1: 

Robert E. Donaldson 
Precinct 2: 

Russell S. Butterfield 
Precinct 3: 

James J. Walker 
Precinct 4: 

John J. McNulty 
Precinct 5: 

George F. Waite 
Precinct 6: 

Alfred H. Coburn 



Precinct 7: 

Carl J. Lebedzinski 
Precinct 8: 

Herbert T Knutson 
Precinct 9: 

Russell E. Starck 
Precinct 10: 

Melvin P. dejager 
Precinct 11: 

Harold C. Giffin 
Precinct 12: 

Robert T. Clough 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1st, 1985 through December 31st, 1985 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1985: 
Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank. Lowell, Mass. 

Interest 

The ComFed Savings Bank, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 

Total Interest Received: 



$332.80 



400.20 



72.99 



Transfer of Funds: 

From the Central Savings Bank to the ComFed Savings Bank . 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1985 and 

Receipts and Transfers 



Deduct Disbursements: 

For Veteran's Assistance; one application approved for 
payment of medical bills; from Central Savings Bank: . 



For Transfer of Funds: 
From the Central Savings Bank to the ComFed 
Savings Bank: 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1985: 



ASSETS 



Central Savings Bank. Lowell. Mass. Account No. 128790 
Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. Account 

No. 440007341 

ComFed Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. Account No. 457400012 

Total Assets 



LIABILITIES 



Total Liabilities: 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities: 



$10,432.78 



3.000.00 



14,238.77 



350.00 
13.888.77 



3,000 00 
10,888 77 



3,679.54 



4,136.24 
3,072.99 



10,888 77 




None 


$10,888 77 





Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



The committee extends its appreciation to various other 
town officials, and particularly the staff of the office of the 
Veterans' Agent, who have assisted the committee during 
the past year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 
Town of Chelmsford 



Alfred H. Coburn, Chairman 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 97 

Appointed Town Officials - 76 

Board of Appeals 87 

Board of Assessors 51 

Board of Registrars 57 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Cable TV Commission 88 

Celebrations Committee 88 

Cemetery Commission 51 

Civil Defense Commission 88 

Conservation Commission 90 

Council on Aging 89 

Cultural Council 90 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Fire Department 82 

General Information 2 

Health Department 51 

Highway Department 83 

Historical Commission 91 

Historic District Commission 91 

Holiday Decorations Committee 92 

Housing Authority 53 

Insect Pest Control 92 

Inspector of Animals 87 

Inspector of Buildings 84 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 54 

Park Department 54 

Planning Board 55 

Police Department 85 

Police —Auxiliary 86 

Public Libraries 56 

Recreation Commission 93 

School Committee 58 

Sewer Commission 74 

Sign Advisory Committee 93 

Town Accountant 77 

Town Clerk 7 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 6, 1985 and April 29, 1985 8 

Town Election Results 22 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting April 29. 1985 20 

Annual Town Meeting April 29, 1985 23 

Special Town Meeting April 29, 1985 24 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 6, 1985 28 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 13, 1985 33 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting June 24, 1985 42 

Special Town Meeting, June 24, 1985 43 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 75 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 95 

Veterans' Services 94 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town cotnnittee, please 
fill our this form and mail to: Executive Secretary, Board of Selectmen, 
Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out 
of this form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE. 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK. 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING. 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS. 



NOTES 



NOTES 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 256-3621 

Assessors: 256-2031 

Board of Appeals Clerk: 256-7164 (12:30-4:30 p.m.) 

Building Inspector: 256-8346 

(Yard Sales, Kennel Permits & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery Garage: 256-8671 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 

Conservation Commission: 256-7164 (12:30-4:30 p.m.) 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 
Dog Officer: 256-0754 
Fire Department: 256-2543 
Gas Inspector: 256-8347 
Health Department: 256-2061 
Highway Department: 256-2161 

Garage: 251-4841 
High School, Richardson Rd.: 251-8792 
Housing Authority, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Housing for the Elderly, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams-256-5521; McKay- 251-3212 
Massachusetts Electric Co.: 459-1431 
Park Department Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 256-6491 
Plumbing Inspector: 453-2746 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office (Center): 256-2361 

Recreation Comm.: 256-0028 (8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.) 
Registry of Deeds: 458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Dept., 75 Graniteville Rd. 251-4981 
Selectmen: 256-2441 
Sewer Commission: 250-1727 
Supt. of Public Buildings: 256-0577 
Town Aide: 256-0013 
Town Clerk: 256-4104 
Town Engineer: 256-1204 
Treasurer/Tax Collector: 256-2122 
Veterans' Agent: 256-8713 
Water Department (Center): 256-2381 
Welcome Wagon: 256-0847 



Welfare: 454-8061, 33 Middle St. Lowell 

Wiring Inspector: 256-8347 

24-hr. Juror Hot Line (Toll Free) 800-792-5117 

POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS; 

Precinct 1: Town Offices, 50 Billerica Rd. 

Precinct 2: North Congregational Church, Shaw Street 

Precinct 3: Parker School. Graniteville Rd. 

Precinct 4: East School, Carlisle St. 

Precinct 5: Byam School, Maple Rd. 

Precinct 6: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 

Precinct 7: North Congregational Church, Shaw Street 

Precinct 8: Small Gymnasium, McCarthy 

Junior High School 
Precinct 9: South Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 10: South Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 11: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 
Precinct 12: Small Gymnasium, McCarthy 

Junior High School 
Senators Edward Kennedy & John F. Kerry 
JFK Federal Building, Government Center, 
Boston. MA 02203 

Russell Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 
Rep. Bruce Freeman: Room 146, State House, Boston, 
MA 02133 727-2560 (Office) 
Home: 7 Kenwood St., Chelmsford. 256-2944 
Senator Carol Amick: Room 416A, State House, 
Boston, MA 02133 722-1571 (Office) 
Home: 18 Crescent Rd., Bedford, 275-2644 
Congressman Chester G. Atkins 
Cannon Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 
Middlesex County Commissioners: 494-4100 
Superior Courthouse, E. Cambridge, MA 02141